2019/2020 Public Comments to Preliminary Applications

AGENCIES SUBMITTING PRELIMINARY APPLICATIONS

Please click on an agency to view the public comments received for that agency's preliminary application. All agencies submitting preliminary applications are listed below and only those agencies shown in bold received public comments.

BLM FIELD OFFICES

**Support As Submitted** BLM RFO has shown proper use of funds over the decades, and is OHV oriented to the OHV community overall. They do a fantastic job for California families. David Pickett as individual and past D36MCSC Inc. LAO Director. DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT** I support Law Enforcement, and encourage Education over Citation when possible and makes sense. LE is a critical component in support of mandated CA PRC codes... David Pickett as an individual and past D36MCSC Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT** This grant, as laid out makes sense especially in meeting Public Resource Codes to keep the area viable for managed and environmentally compliant as defined in application. Please fund this Grant. David Pickett as individual and past D36MCSP Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT AS SUBMITTED** Law Enforcement Grants are critical to managed OHV recreation areas. While I believe in Education over Citation where appropriate, law enforcement is much more than this. Support, Dave Pickett as individual and past D36MCSP Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT AS SUBMITTED** BLM has been a good partner to the OHV program, and this grant is no different. Ukiah Field Office faces challenges in the area, along with expansion for OHV recreation opportunities in this well liked recreation area. Mother Nature has not been kind to this area due to factors above and beyond this field offices control with fires, etc. I support this Grant. David Pickett as an individual & and past D36MCSC Inc. Leg Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


 

NATIONAL PARKS SERVICE

First I do not think it appropriate for a Federal agency to request state funds. The park does not allow green sticker motor vehicle operation. Giving funds collected from green sticker fees to a park that does not allow green sticker operation should be denied. This project does nothing for the OHV community besides take the funding away from projects that deserve it. Robert Bitner - 3/4/2020


I'm NOT in favor of Death Valley using OHV monies for restoration as Death Valley does not allow green and red sticker OHV... my vote is NO Joe Rodriguez - 3/3/2020


Death Valley National park is an excellent steward of millions of acres of the California desert and very deserving of a grant to help with illegal off road activity that puts scars on its beautiful scenery. Jonathan Shelley - 3/3/2020

Because of the size and remoteness of much of Death Valley, it can be difficult to monitor and prevent illegal off-road use in these beautiful and unique areas. The grant would help for this. Sue Eipert - 3/7/2020

I think using Green Sticker grant funds to enable restoration at Death Valley is a creative idea and badly needed. I live near Death Valley and hike or tourist there frequently. I saw the off road vehicle damage at the Racetrack and near Badwater, and during the most recent government shutdown, saw people driving off road on the playa in the valley. Been coming to Death Valley for many years; can't remember so much off road damage as in last few years. Seems only fitting that OHV money help restore the damage that off road folks cause. And I particularly like the prevention component of the proposal, a smart use of money so they won't have to come back and ask for restoration funds. Stopping damage before it happens is always better for everyone involved! B. Bane - 3/9/2020


DVNP is requesting funding for restoration projects that clearly meet the requirements of the regulations. The proposal includes the specific sites that would be funded, along with the specific work on the projects (restoration, monitoring, signage, fencing, barriers). These projects will restore natural resource systems to their natural state when unauthorized motor vehicle use has damaged an area off limits to OHV recreation. National Parks are the crown jewels of America’s public lands. Preventing illegal off-road driving in the park is critical. These funds will assist in preventing others from following in the tracks of those who have traveled off-road illegally. DVNP’s grant proposal clearly meets all the requirements outlined in the regulations and should be fully funded. S Goss, for Sierra Club CA Desert Comm - 3/24/2020


These comments are submitted on behalf of Desert Survivors (DS), a 501c(3) non profit organization whose mission is promote preservation of our wild desert lands. DS supports the grant request be fully funded to Death Valley National Park (DVNP.) Our members and officers have visited DVNP and the surrounding country for many decades. Along with a rise in visitation, sadly we have also seen an increase in damage due to illegal Off Highway Vehicle trespass. Left unchecked, this damage will further degrade the wild and cultural values of our national heritage. The monies DVNP is requesting for restoration projects clearly meet the requirements of the regulations. The proposal includes specific sites that would be funded, as well as the specific work projects (restoration, monitoring, signage, fencing, barriers) for the identified sites. Besides restoring natural resource systems to their condition prior to vehicle trespass, these grant monies will aid DVNP staff in forestalling future damage as well as enhancing their response capabilities. Preventing illegal off-road driving in the park is critical. These funds will assist in preventing others from unknowingly following in the tracks of trespassers. DVNP’s grant proposal should be fully funded. David McMullen Director at Large, Desert Survivors

endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020

JTNP has seen a tremendous increase in visitation over the past several years. This has led to a significant increase in the amount of illegal OHV incursions. This proposal by the park will allow them to create a system-wide plan to address the problem, instead of playing whack-a-mole. The park realizes that they need to take a proactive approach to the issue and this grant will allow them to start the process. In January, our group spent 2 days installing barriers with park personnel in an effort to reduce illegal OHV impact in Berdoo Canyon. Driving to and from the worksite each day, we saw many other areas that needed our attention as well. This grant will allow the park to gain a better understanding of what is needed going forward and should be fully funded. S Goss, on behalf of Desert Survivors - 4/2/2020


US FOREST SERVICE

This is a popular area for many users- ohv, man bike, hikers and dog walkers. The bridge has been out for many years, replacing this bridge for multi use is needed for safety, user enjoyment as well as water quality. Than you for replacing the bridge!Teresa - 3/4/2020



Hi, there - Just want to let you know we do use these roads. Thanks for the heads up. Laurel Marsters - High Country Unit Backcountry Horsemen - 3/12/2020


Diane Uchytil let me know of this situation. I am from Milford and I ride all of the area from Janesville Grade to Doyle Grade. Please keep these roads accessible to vehicles, off road ATVs and especially horses. Our family uses all of these methods of travel and also camp and hike. Our High Unit Backcountry Horsemen group also are active in helping keep trails open. We are available to do hand work or pack in crews with our pack animals. Please keep us in mind when you need some volunteer help. We have been active in the Caribou and South Warner Wilderness. I really hope we can do more in our Plumas. We also helped with Meadowview Campground. Thank you for your time. Sandy Jansen - 3/12/2020


This forest would benefit greatly from additional spending on maintenance of roads, etc. The Stanislaus surrounds multiple communities that depend heavily on the recreation it offers but due to the close proximity of this forest to those communities it also presents risk. It would be of benefit to maintain the roads for both forest goers as well as any necessary fire response such as accessing remote starts or simply being able to anchor on an adequate road or trail to build a containment line and potentially save a neighboring community and the forest itself.Josh Carsner - 3/4/2020



endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


US FOREST PATROL DISTRICTS

Hello, My name is Nicholas Kniveton and I am an avid backcountry snowmobiler. I primarily ride in the greater Lake Tahoe area. My main riding area is in the Wrights Lake and Ice House reservoir area as my family owns a cabin at Wrights Lake. The entire community of Wrights Lake cabin owners has noticed a perplexing and disturbing increase in aggressive law enforcement by the El Dorado USFS Patrol District. Cabin owners are frequently stopped, interrogated, and cited for trivial violations. Recently, after years of accessing our cabins by snowmobile, the Patrol district decided that this was illegal and began to cite cabin owners. The Patrol district explained that riding off trail, next to the road (which was covered in 10 feet of snow) is legal, but riding on top of the road is illegal. The cabin owners were confused, as the cited reasons for the need of OHV enforcement (As the grant request states “The majority of the OHV use area has sensitive ecological areas which include meadows, streams and stream crossings along designated routes, sensitive plant occurrences and sensitive wildlife habitat identified through the travel management analysis, and sensitive cultural resources close to designated roads and trails.”) do not seem to align with prohibiting vehicles from traveling over a road and instead forcing them to travel off road. ? The cabin owners then spoke to the El Dorado Forest Supervisor, who was shocked this was occurring and informed us that this was due to new enforcement of a motor vehicle map that was created decades ago, and the intention was never to prohibit cabin owners from using their cabins in the winter. He quickly wrote cabin owners a letter exempting cabin owners. However, this did not stop the constant interrogation by USFS patrol district LEOs. USFS LEOs would sit at trailheads for hours, waiting to interrogate the next snowmobiler to come or leave. Some cabin owners were cited as they forgot to bring their letter with them on their person, and instead left it in their car. I was personally interrogated for nearly an hour before being let off, and requested that I inform the USFS anytime I plan to access my cabin, along with the duration of my trip, and who was with me. Another owner was cited as the family member he brought with him for safety (As the USFS says, always snowmobile with a buddy) was not technically a cabin owner. OHV users felt like they were living in a communist, totalitarian society where they had to carry documents during travel to access their own property. Perplexed by this extreme enforcement, I contacted the Captain of the El Dorado Patrol District. I asked him why the district was focusing so heavily on the Wrights Lake area, which had not received any complaints about violations, and seemed to be ignoring other areas where frequent use and complaints were occurring. I also asked why the district was changing the status quo and enforcing laws from decades ago that the Forest Supervisor stated were not infected to prohibit snowmobiling. The Captain, Frank Aguilar, informed me that the Patrol District has 5 full time LEOs year round. He said that in the winter, there is little work for his officers to do, and “he doesn’t want them to just sit in their offices because there are no complaints”. Therefore, he would instruct them to go out in the field and wait to interrogate OHV users trailheads for hours despite there being no evidence of rule breaking or any other complaint. It is very clear to me that staffing at the El Dorado Patrol district is much higher than it needs to be. From the experience of the Wrights Lake OHV community, as well as my discussion with the Captain, its clear that there are many staff members who would be literally sitting in their chairs all day with nothing to do, but are instead forced to go camp at trailheads and enforce confusing, decades old laws that were not intended for modern OHV use, in a desperate attempt to fill their otherwise empty schedule. Providing $225,600 in funding for staff that have nothing to do is a very poor use of OHV grant money. I believe any further funding of El Dorado Patrol District Staff would not benefit the OHV community, and instead should be directed to projects such as Education and Safety initiatives that truly help the OHV community. Nicholas Kniveton - 4/2/2020


I am opposed to granting any additional funds to USFS El Dorado National Forest to be used for law enforcement. In my opinion USFS Law Enforcement is already overstaffed, particularly in the winter. To justify their staffing levels they are patrolling the forest looking for infractions and citing people for petty or non-existent offenses. I believe that most law enforcement issues in the forest that warrant attention can be addressed by the Sheriff's department. I own a cabin at Wright's Lake and have traveled into the lake in the winter via snowmobile for over 30 years. In recent years I have noticed an increase in FPOs and LEOs stopping, aggressively questioning, harassing, and in some cases issuing citations for fabricated infractions to law abiding citizens traveling into their cabins via snowmobile. This problem became worse over the winter and spring of 2018/2019 when I witnessed first hand and heard a number of reports from others of LEOs waiting at the Ice House and Wright's Road entrances and traveling into the lake themselves via snowmobile. They told cabin owners including myself who were carrying a letter from the Forest Supervisor giving permission for them to travel to their cabins that they would be cited if they had anyone accompanying them on a snowmobile who was not a cabin owner. This was in my opinion a fabricated violation by LEO since the letter did not explicitly allow non-owners to travel with owners. If owners had followed the LEOs' directive they could be forced to travel alone into the back country in the winter, a dangerous practice. In April 2019 I was snowmobiling into Wright's Lake with two non-owners and a LEO gave me a citation for for the above described offense. I reached to to the Forest Supervisor who promptly revised his letter to include non cabin owning traveling companions which removed the basis for this fabricated offense. I am aware of one other cabin owner who was traveling with non-owner companions and received a citation for the same violation. I had to take a half day of my personal time to travel to the Federal Courthouse in Sacramento and appear to address this citation which was immediately dismissed. I listened to others who were appearing for their citations and was struck by the relatively minor and petty nature of most of the citations. It strikes me as a tremendous waste of taxpayer money, that to justify their staffing levels LEOs continue to issue citations for petty or non-existent offenses and these people are run through the court system to pay judges, prosecutors, court staff, etc. In the 50+ years that I have spent time in the El Dorado National Forest, I have never seen an issue that could not have been handled by the Sherriff's department. I think that LEO staffing in the forest should be minimized and not expanded. Thank you. Doug Kniveton - 4/3/2020


I support the grant application by the Lassen/Modoc National Forest for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. Butte County citizens routinely and fairly heavily access the LNF at Butte Meadows and the High Lakes for recreational enjoyment. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on forest service roads in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. I believe the area described could actually use a lot more law enforcement coverage, and encourage the LNF to consider that for future grant applications to ensure LEO coverage in the High Lakes area on weekends and holidays, including nighttime activity in unauthorized areas that would require overnight coverage. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


I support the grant application by the Plumas National Forest for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on our county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. The PNF campgrounds and OHV roads associated with them are often accessed via the highway system, so the need for a truck and trailer to haul OHVs used by LEOs is essential. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


CITIES

2/27/20 Prairie Falcon nesting habitat. In regards to the Habitat Management Plan, and applicable parts of your State Parks OHV grant proposals. Please include these comments in your grant pre submission public comments. I hope you are continuing to include in your HMP and OHV grant proposals the needs and attempts by prairie falcons to nest on Cadillac Butte. They attempt to breed yearly and are again breeding there as of 2/1/20. The areas on and around the Cadillac butte eyrie continue to have competitive motorized events, and ohv users continue to use unauthorized trails up onto the butte near the nesting sites. Recreational shooters continue to use this area which is close to California City, near a highly used private property and a designated camp site by California City. The shooting activity disturbs the nesting falcons. And is not permitted within California City limits. I have shown you evidence of ohv users ignoring this law, because there is no signage in the area. Signage and trail remediation (annually) is necessary to change ohv users habits and inform shooters in the area. In addition, there is a need for coordination between BLM, California City and Kern County in regards to desert use in the Castle Butte area. California City encourages and promotes OHV use in the Castle Butte area, and BLM through coordinated trails and maps promotes use in California City and Kern County areas. This also affects prairie nests sites in the nearby areas. California City and BLM should coordinate their wildlife habit needs in regards to OHV use. Your grant sections within grounds, and law enforcement will hopefully include continued funding for this particular area of need. Please include these comments in your pre submission comments for March 2nd deadlines. Sincerely, Steve Shaw Steve Shaw - 3/4/2020


COUNTIES

**SUPPORT** Amador County Sheriff's office puts Grant Money from OHMVRD to good use each year. As a resident of this county I appreciate the work they do in collaboration with USFS, especially in the safety area, management of legal operations, and Education over Citation when appropriate. The County of Amador is rural, and OHV recreation in the county is a destination that many folks like to recreate in using the USFS as partners, especially on 3 day holiday weekends. Off Highway Vehicle recreation creates a positive socio-economic impact to the positive for our business community throughout the county. Please support this Grant as it has a positive impact, and has done so for many years. My family supports this, David Pickett Resident of Amador County & Past Legislative Action Officer/AMA District 36 MCSC, Inc. DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


Yes, it is all that should be said Much needed since #CAMPFIRE be well be real be American.Darryl G Evans - 3/3/2020


I support the grant application by the Butte County Sheriff's office for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on our county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) have helped to make Downieville a lively town again. They have brought people to this beautiful place and do the work to keep it clean. They are also very community oriented. Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) have a well oiled group of people who are focused on making this world a little bit better. Please help them by granting this grant. Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) has a very clear and hopeful plan for the towns around Plumas county. By granting this grant you are sure to help forward movement Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater of the existing Mt Hough trail system I fully support additional development in this area as 1) SBTS builds sustainable trails using existing features and old logging roads that, 2) the recent trail development has brought substantial recreation money into the area and addition trails would just bring more, and 3) the existing trail system is becoming so popular that we need additional trails to continue to sustain the level of interest and the desired secluded yet close to town popularity of the Mt Hough area. It is my understanding that the phase 2 would also include a decent into Taylorsville which would expand the sphere of recreation money spent in the community. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


Growing up in the area I have used the Claremont ‘trail system’ numerous time for hiking, hunting, and biking. It desperately needs to be modified to sustainable trail as it is an existing non conforming trail system that should be adopted into the official trail system. The proposed project would use existing user created trail and connect multiple recreation site together allowing for great multi use trail system. Plumas county, maybe more now than ever, need to advocate for additional recreation revenue in our communities. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater of these trails, I can attest that the proposed trails desperately need maintenance increased sustainability of the trail tread. I grew up hiking on these trails and they have become more and more overgrown, without maintenance they will disipear and cut off recreation access to some of the most spectacular views in the Feather River Water Shed. Trails throughout the region no only bring me personal joy, but also bring substation recreation dollars into Plumas county which depends on yearly recreation revenue. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


Mt Hough is known around the world for its mountain bikingand more trails are very welcomed. They bring tourists from all over to the area and put money into the local economies, create jobs, and more trails will show the county is progressing and embracing the outdoor community. More trails will also create more properly managed land for water shed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. However, these trails are very popular and by expanded they will be utilized and will show that Quincy is on the forefront off world-class trails systems. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I have not utilized the Claremont area trail system, but I would love to explore it if the proposed 40 mile addition were to come to pass. This planning and analysis would pave the way for trails to be built, which would bring tourist dollars to the area and would keep jobs in the county. Please fund it! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Trail work and Ground operations are important to the community by bringing people into the county to recreate and supplying local jobs. It is important to build long lasting trails the proper,sustainable way. Jared - 4/3/2020


More trails on Mt Hough sound awesome. Connecting existing single track that otherwise isn't ridden by mountain bikes will greatly improve the riding on hough. It will also do the community good by supplying more local jobs and bringing more tourism into the community and economy. Jared - 4/3/2020


If there were system trails on Claremont above Quincy it would improve the riding in quincy greatly. It would also help the local economy by supplying jobs and more attraction and reasons to come to town Jared - 4/3/2020


The development of trails in this area have been a game changer for Quincy and Plumas County. Not only has it increased the health and well-being of our community members, it has increased the economic viability of our community. What was once a burnt-out and heavily disturbed logging area is now also a multi-use recreation zone that brings a richness for our little town. More of that! Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


The development of trails in this area have been a game changer for Quincy and Plumas County. Not only has it increased the health and well-being of our community members, it has increased the economic viability of our community. What was once a burnt-out and heavily disturbed logging area is now also a multi-use recreation zone that brings a richness for our little town. More of that! Since COVID 19, I have seen our community come out in force (6 feet apart) to use local trails. It's not only good for our economy, but good for sanity. Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


The potential development of this area for trails is a great use of a heavily logged/fire prone mountain right next to town. Trail development on this area would not only get people out in the forest behind their fence, but create awareness of what's out there. Trail development could also mitigate some fire hazards and make our community a little bit safer. Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


Mt Hough is one of my favorite places to ride, primarily because the trails are always maintained and are in excellent shape. This is because of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship trail crew. They care about the area, and really give their all to make sure the trails are able to be enjoyed by everyone. Please fund them! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Mt Hough is one of my favorite places to ride. I am excited by the potential for more than 30 miles of new trails in the area. So much to explore! This trail development will help keep jobs in Plumas County. Please fund this! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


I support the grant application by the Plumas County Sheriff's office for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. Plumas County's Sheriff's Office patrols areas frequented by citizens of Butte County, such as the Bucks Lake area and the High Lakes. High usage requires law enforcement presence to mitigate harmful activity and also serve as a resource in the event of accidents or need for information/education. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


Thanks to the OHV grant last year there has been significant progress in maintaining OHV regulations and laws. Morongo Valley Neighborhood Watch respectfully requests that this grant be awarded in order to sustain the current progress and make sure that future illegal OHV activities are avoided. Susan Lefevre - 3/11/2020


Continued grant funding will enable us to maintain our successful community relationship with the Morongo station OHV team and to secure gains made over the past year. Because of funding provided through this grant; we were able to meet with Sgt. Hanke numerous times throughout this past year to target OHV problem areas in Morongo Valley. We are grateful for the concentrated support we have received from the Morongo Basin Sheriff's OHV team and ask that funding continue in order to maintain recent progress. Sharon Dove - 3/13/2020


Seems as though the polluters have been deemed to be OHV users even though there is overwhelming documentation to point at the homeless, drug users, and thieves that inhabit this sensitive fishery. If the Santa Barbara County Sheriffs office were serious about the environment, then an effort to eliminate pollution from those that cause major damage would be planned funded. This is nothing more than a revenue enhancement scheme aimed at the havesLarry Matulis - 3/3/2020


Dear California State Parks Officials, As a lifelong resident of Santa Barbara County, I am skeptical of the ability of the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office to responsibly utilize these grant funds. I believe this law enforcement grant would be better spent by other agencies for the following reasons: The SBSO has a recent track record of overspending on projects that use inadequate contractors and lack little if any oversight. They contracted with Rosser International, a Georgia-based engineering firm that abruptly shut down in July 2019 after only partially completing work on a new jail facility in northern Santa Barbara County. The North County Jail was originally supposed to open in 2018 and cost an estimated $77 million but the total project so far has cost $111 million and the SBSO announced a tentative opening time of May 2020. However, the SBSO has still not arranged contractors to provide food and medical services. The SBSO is the subject of numerous grand jury reports and lawsuits in the past 30 years, mainly related to its operation of the Main Jail in Santa Barbara. Smuggling of contraband into the facility is a recurring problem due to a lack of training and equipment. In August 2019, 18 inmates were hospitalized in one day for a mass overdose on opiates. The SBSO received about $80 million in state grants for the North County Jail yet the Grand Jury has repeatedly requested basic improvements to the current Main Jail like X-ray scanners to find smuggled weapons and cellphones and search dogs trained to find drugs. On Feb. 21 this year, two SBSO deputies working in the facility were arrested on multiple felony sexual assault charges after a two-year internal investigation. The slow response to these serious charges is unacceptable and, along with pending DUI and excessive force charges on other deputies, reflects a general culture of lax oversight. As a grant writer who has written detailed applications to federal and state agencies and an active hiker and fisherman, I find the SBSO's description of the problem they face to be laughable. I don't understand how steelhead trout in a large river are seriously threatened by offroad vehicles on land. The application also stated that SBSO deputies found a gill net in the river, yet I have never heard of or seen any illegal netting in this area in the last 20 years. Abandoned vehicles, bonfires, and drinking are more prevalent in other wilderness areas and many local hiking trails and portions of the Los Padres National Forest are littered with broken glass, beer cans, and charred wood. People have also graffitied on Native American cave paintings that are more than 1000 years old. All of these problems exist in other areas of SBSO jurisdiction and their prevalence shows the lack of ability and avoidance of foot patrols and getting out of cars among the SBSO. Mountain bikes or foot patrols would be better-suited to patrolling the area than ATV's, which are loud and would alert anyone nearby. Bike and foot patrols of creeks and wooded areas by other agencies near the city of Santa Barbara prevent illegal camping, fires, dumping, and environmental destruction. The SBSO only has an initial fitness test and there are no ongoing requirements or incentives compelling SBSO deputies to stay physically fit. Although measuring the Body Mass Index of applicants is beyond the scope and abilities of this grant program, the results would probably help explain why SBSO deputies have not effectively patrolled rural and wilderness areas in the past. In conclusion, the public interest would be better served by allocating grant funding to other agencies or areas of the state. The SBSO has stagnant leadership and outdated law enforcement methods and is locally distinguished by its lack of professionalism and misappropriation of funding. I urge your grant-making agency to direct funds to where they are needed most instead of taking the exaggerations in this application at face value. Sincerely, Greg FischerGreg Fischer - 3/4/2020


 

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

**SUPPORT** CA Youth Programs are needed in OHV recreation, and with this tie in with State Partner NYPUM, I support this Grant Applicant and submission for funding. Thank you, David Pickett as Individual & past D36MCSC,Inc Legislative Action Office Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


I support this grant for monitoring. I helped clear invasive weeds at the DTRNA lands and saw a number of OHV incursions; in some cases, fence was pulled down or damaged to allow illegal entry. They need this grant for monitoring and repair! Barbara Bane - 3/24/2020


I support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center and all it does for the public. I also support ESAC receiving a grant to reach a broader audience. Neil Satterfield - 3/11/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a necessary resource in our region and without it could compromise the safety of the public especially those who use public recreational areas. Daniel Ranson - 3/12/2020


I have been using the esac information and data since they have begun. I find it to be an essential for my safety and the people I am with. Their website follows professional protocols and the forecasters are extremely qualified. The information provided by them has kept me making smart decisions and plays such an important role to the community. They cover a large mountain range, something which is impossible for just me to gather data. I am thankful we have this opportunity to reference data, as these decisions play an important role to all us backcountry explorers. I fully support this entity and hope there will be many more years to come. Thank you, Brett Lotz - 3/12/2020


I strongly support this grant application by ESAC and their goal of expanding already successful organization to insure the safety of the OHV community. ESAC has a proven track record in providing accurate and useful avalanche education and information for winter back country travelers of the Eastern Sierra. As a OHV user and frequent back country traveler, I feel this project is greatly needed in the Eastern Sierra. We have a large and growing OHV community and this resource for avalanche education and safety information will undoubtedly save lives and help to keep OHV users safe in avalanche terrain. ESAC's excellent reputation and background working directly with land managers and decision makers in the communities of the Eastern Sierra make them an ideal orginization to launch this OHV specific program. This grant project would be an excellent investment of OHV funds and would create an avalanche safety infrastructure that will benefit the OHV community long after the grant funds are exhausted. Thank you for your consideration of the ESAC application. Brian Robinette - 3/14/2020


I and many others frequently use the ESAC website for information on current avalanche conditions. ESAC is our only resource to help make safe riding discussion in our area. I would like to see ESAC get funding from the OHV fund to further their work and to help us to continue to recreate safely. John Graves Snowmobiler John Graves - 3/21/2020


As a residence of Mono County for the previous 18 years and backcountry enthusiastic , I depend on ESAC to determine the my own safety so does my riding group. In order to stay safe and return to my family after every ride I currently have to seek for education in different county’s or even states. It would be great to see ESAC get funding from the OHV fund to further their work and to help us to continue to recreate safely. Lucas Ropke Backcountry snowmobiler Enthusiastic Lucas Ropke - 3/22/2020


I am a resident of Mammoth Lakes and a winter backcountry traveler. I use the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's (ESAC) winter avalanche advisory regularly. It is a crucial first step in my winter recreation. As mentioned in the grant application, motorized winter use is growing quickly. I have witnessed this over the years. Awareness of the avalanche risk (and managing it) are a part of the culture of backcountry skiing and snowboarding. This awareness and management saves lives. It does not seem to be as much a part of the culture among winter OHV users. I think that additional resources to allow ESAC to reach out to OHV users with marketing and advertising, and with free OHV-specific resources at the ESAC website, could save lives in the OHV community. Ian McEleney - 3/24/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


Huntington lake Volunteer Fire Department does an excellent job of patrolling a large area of trails in the Huntington lake basin. This is a remote area with many summertime visitors. Huntington Lake Volunteers are the only EMS/Fire personnel in a very large area who can render immediate aid. They also help the U.S. Forest Service answer visitor questions and directions during busy summer weekends. This volunteer work requires special equipment - that is why I speak to support their request. Thanks Brad Driscoll - 3/27/2020


Huntington lake Volunteer Fire Department does an excellent job of patrolling a large area of trails in the Huntington lake basin. This is a remote area with many summertime visitors. Huntington Lake Volunteers are the only EMS/Fire personnel in a very large area who can render immediate aid. They also help the U.S. Forest Service answer visitor questions and directions during busy summer weekends. This volunteer work requires special equipment - that is why I speak to support their request. Thanks Brad Driscoll - 3/27/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


As the president of Main Street Murals it has been my honor to witness how the community of Barstow and surrounding areas have embraced the educational opportunities offered at the Desert Discovery Center. Buses full of students come there and learn the wonders of our desert and how it is their place to make sure that it is protected for generations to come. Main Street Murals youth program has taken many groups of youth and their parents out into the desert to experience it first hand through camping, clean-up and exploration adventures. This grant would make these and other opportunities available to many more. KATHLEEN FIERRO - 3/13/2020


WOW FANTASTIC. I TOTALLY SUPPORT THIS GRANT. WHAT A WONDERFUL AND STRAIGHT FORWARD APPROACH TO EDUCATE THE CHILDREN AND PUBLIC ABOUT SAFETY AND ALL THAT GOES WITH RESPONSIBLE OFF ROAD ACTIVITIES. GIVING OPPORTUNITY FOR CHILDREN TO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES THEY MAY NOT HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO THESE THINGS OTHERWISE. THESE PROGRAMS ARE IMPORTANT. THANK YOU James Lynn - 3/17/2020


GREAT PEOPLE DOING A GREAT JOB.James Lynn - 3/17/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


I was lucky enough to attend the level 1 avalanche training course put on this winter. I find the knowledge and daily forecasts put out by the center to be incredibly valuable for the Sierra community. The information for anyone venturing into the backcountry is critical. The ability to get educated on the risks associated with exposure to certain conditions and terrain is a huge opportunity the center provides the public who use and love our land. This service to the community is a big endeavor and we are very fortunate to have. Please continue to support their mission. Thank you for your consideration. Matthew D. Mingrone - 3/28/2020


I write to comment on the SAC grant proposal. As mentioned in the proposal, avalanche terrain is easily accessible with motorized OSVs. The need for an avalanche forecast and motorized educational training sessions are invaluable. Having gone through the Level 1, I can unequivocally say that the practical application of avalanche education about conditions and the tools (rather than mere book learning), cannot be over value. Without a formal approach applied practically, time is lost, and with time lost the risk to life increases. I whole heartedly endorse the SAC grant proposal! R. Behrens - 4/2/2020


Participated in this program last winter. Awesome and super informative program educating motorized riders to be safe in avalanche terrain and backcountry environments. Sam Caven - 4/2/2020


To whom it may concern, I took the Motorized Level 1 course in January 2020. Before taking the course I thought I may never venture into the back country again because 1. I'd be too scared and traumatized by the class content to continue 2. I'd be overloaded with academic information to the point that I'd not retaiin anything and not be able to use it in real life. After taking the Motorized 1 class I was very releaved to find that I'd been equiped with simple, methodical, and easy to access information. The skills I take with me keep myself and others more safe. The trend for backcountry use has been rapidly rising in recent history. This spring, more people than ever are venturing out because ski resorts are done. Having trained people out and about, human powered and motorized, is going to be more and more important as we move into the future. A trained person may be able to say something as simple as "Hey, lets wait until that group above us moves across to a safe spot, then we can continue on". Or, "I don't think this is a safe option, how do you all feel?" This can save lives. . If Motorized 11 class were offered in the future I'd be one of the first to sign up. I'm motoviated to become more knowlegable about the environment I choose to explore, how to manage the people I choose to be with and the people that happen to be out there. I'm super impressed with tthe three day Motorized 1 class. The instructors are top nothch pros. The content is straight forward. The premise of the Motorized 1 class is: Dont get in an avalanch in the first place, but if somebody does, know what to do. That is the right mindset. I cant stress the importance of the Motorized 1 and 11 classes. I hope there will be funding to help train responsible backcoiuntry users. Thank you, Brian Thom Brian Thom - 4/3/2020


I have then multiple avalanche level 1 and 2 courses. The SAC 3 day OHV course was by far the best and most informative course. The instructors were excellent(Duncan and Justin). They provided the information across a wide variety of experiences in a friendly and easy to understand way. The on-the-job training while snowmobiling in the backcountry was invaluable for witnessing real life avalanche risks. I would highly recommend this course to all backcountry users and I am definitely signing up for the Rescue and Level2 courses next season.Herb Cunitz - 4/2/2020


Hello, My name is Nicholas Kniveton and I am an avid backcountry snowmobiler. Last year, I took a Motorized Level 1 Avalanche Course from SAC. This year, I took a Motorized Rescue class. Both of the courses were invaluable, completely changing how I thought about avalanches, backcountry safety, and overall risk management. I have no doubt that the education these classes provided will result in a snowmobiler who would have otherwise been caught in an avalanche returning safely back to their family. There are very few grant requests that have such a direct and tangible impact on saving the lives of OHV users. I understand that there are many Avi courses out there but SAC's is the only one I know of in California that focuses on motorized users of the backcountry, who access terrain in a far different manner (faster travel, more terrain, etc) than skiers or snowshoers. Level 1 classes are typically very expensive, often costing more than $500, so the grant from the OHV is vital to ensuring this class is accessible to those who wouldn't normally be able to afford it. I strongly urge the OHV Grant Program to fully fund SAC’s request. Every single tool from SAC that I have used has been helpful and educational. I skim over the SAC advisory everyday of the winter, and read through it meticulously the morning of any snowmobiling trip. I cannot commend on all aspects of the grant as I am not familiar with all parts, but I can comment on a few specifics:??Motorized Avi classes: As a graduate of SAC’s level 1 and rescue classes, I have been looking to further my avalanche education. I understand SAC needs more funding to add a level 2 Avi class to their curriculum. A level 2 class provides backcountry users with critical skills to asses the snowpack and make educated decisions to ensure safety. The snowmobile community is in dire need of more education, as there are currently zero level 2 classes taught in California. Staffing: All of the instructors for the motorize courses were extremely helpful and helped further my avalanche education. The instructors were top notch; SAC is clearly recruiting the best educators. Professional observers: SAC depends on observations to make their advisories, and while many come from the public, SAC’s professionalisms observations provide me with valuable info that I know is reliable and accurate. Every time I am preparing to go snowmobiling in the backcountry, I look at recent observations, focusing on ones made by SAC’s OHV professional observer, which are extremely helpful in making a safe plan for my trip. Marketing and Advertising: I only found out about SAC’s educational outreach programs through their online advertisement through their social media outreach. This outreach is very helpful for recruiting new OHV users to participate in SAC’s safety programs. Nicholas Kniveton - 4/2/2020


I am an OHV user in the Lake Tahoe area and I heard about the Sierra Avalanche Center's classes through a relative. I signed up for one and was very impressed by the curriculum and caliber of teaching. I have encouraged my friends and social media contacts to sign up for future classes. If one graduate of their class is in a group of skiers or snowmobilers who don't have high avalanche awareness, they can influence others in that group to follow safe practices. The items they are requesting funding for, classes, materials, and equipment, seem like worthy expenditures. Marketing is also a very good idea to spread the word about their classes, especially on social media. Doug Kniveton - 4/3/2020


I am an avid snowmobiler and back-country user. The education with avalanche safety and back-country use that Sierra Avalanche Center provides is amazing. All the information, classes, and on the hill training is top notch and really dials in your skills to be safe. The numbers of winter back-country deaths are much lower in Lake Tahoe then the rest of the country where avalanche dander is a risk. Most of the that, i believe, is because of education hat is provided. Sierra avalanche center provides a lot of courses to teach us how to be more safe, Specifically for me, it teaches me how to read terrain and understand the risks involved with each slope so i do not get myself in a bad situation. More classes out of Sierra Avalanche Center would be really nice to have to increase the knowledge of the locals whom use the back-country daily. Hoping for Zero Deaths and Zero avalanche related injuries. Dimitri - 4/5/2020


April 10, 2020 To the Leadership overseeing the programs funded by California’s Green Sticker Program: My name is Erik Boone and I am a citizen of El Dorado Hills, CA. I am writing this letter on behalf of both myself, as well as other local citizens Chelsea Byrne, Ken Porter, and Tom D’Arcy whom I regular ride snowmobiles with. We are writing today to express our thanks and gratitude to the folks “on the ground” executing on the Green Sticker programs. Every day we see waste, fraud and abuse of our tax dollars and we have very little trust in government programs to actually benefit the folks they were meant to help. However, the Green Sticker program has proved to be an anomaly in government. Our collective experience with the 3-day OHV avalanche safety class with Travis Feist and the Sierra Avalanche Center was excellent. We learned a lot both in the field, at home and in the classroom. My hope is that funding for this program will continue and grow. This is an example of real-life learning that has the potential to save lives in the Sierra back-country. Another example of an excellent individual employee who is making a big difference and maximizing the safety margin for riders is Matthew Brownlee, the Trails Manager who works the Foresthill/China Wall system. Given Corona virus and treacherous storms, many would expect Matt to cease operations. Instead, he has shown true grit and determination and in my mind is one of the few folks to bring confidence back to government. Without his work, folks wouldn’t be able to access the back-country safely, social distancing ourselves from others while still maintaining some outdoor exercise and sanity! In these crazy times, it is so nice to see public figures like Matt Brownlee and Travis Feist providing true value to those of us who pay these publicly mandated fees. Thank You to Matt and Travis – we appreciate you! My hope is that you will in turn give Mr. Brownlee and Mr. Feist the thanks and freedom to do their job that they have rightfully earned. Best Regards, Erik Boone Ken Porter Tom D’Arcy Chelsea Byrne Erik Boone - 4/7/2020


As a Truckee resident and Nevada County Sheriff's SAR volunteer I believe SAC's classes and education is 100% needed for the safety of all back country enthuses. I personal took a Level 1 Avalanche class this past season. I can testify on the professionalism of the instructors and the organization (SAC) setting up the classes and communication regarding the details of class location and times. I have also personally attended a few avalanche awareness events where I'm shocked by the lack of knowledge by the attendees. These attendees are educated and at one event was given a beacon. Even with a Level 1 class behind my belt I appreciate and take advantage of the beacon training SAC continues to provide. SAC has saved more lives than can be counted. SAC is an outstanding and much needed organization for everyone involved with the back country. Nina Clifton - 4/8/2020


Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals Creates local employment Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed I’ve been going up to Downieville for almost 30 years and those are some of the best trails in the world to hike and ride on. Keeping the trails open and maintained is the best thing you could do for the town and people up there. Aaron Cochran - 3/31/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater in the Sierra Buttes/ Downieville area I fully support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship’s continual maintainable of these trail systems. This trail system no only brings me personal joy, but it being substation recreation dollars into Downieville and the greater Lost Sierra region which depends on yearly recreation revenue. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


This Project is crucial in pretecting the local communities by job creation and bringing tourism to these rural areas. Also helping the local environment by protecting these public spaces and the watershed. These trails are are the heartbeat for the outdoor community and are why I travel from my home in Reno Nevada every week to enjoy, spend money, and appreciate these communities. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, and the Downieville & Quincy trail systems in general. These systems are a sustainable (as in, long lasting) utilization of the area, and benefit a huge range of the population, as opposed to private ownership or use, which severely limits the investment of revenue in the local economy, and instead moves it to other areas, through resource extraction by a private firm, or by ownership of a private entity, the wealth of which resides in a far off bank, and is expended with no preference for Plumas County. The trails allow so many different types of people to enjoy the area. Sitting in Downtown Downieville, you'll see all manner of cyclists, hikers, moto riders, and 4x4 drivers, all smiling through a coating of dirt. These people have equipped themselves with gear from business that depend on the existince of trails like this to make their passions a viable business, and in turn serve these folks who share that passion. So, for economic and philosophical reasons, I encourage you to continue supporting Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Sincerely, BenBen Clemens - 4/2/2020


This groups effort in gathering the information for this report should be commended so much information in a few pages. The amount of trail time vs person spending time on the trails sees huge and is testament to how much work they do to spread the good news. This groups venture in both Plumas and Sierra Counties is huge and the quality of maps, website information and work they do is amazing! Matt Boyd - 4/3/2020


The amount of work this organization does far outweighs the amount they request each year. This group is top notch, allows for recreation in an area that is in need of visitors, and does so with a minimal impact on the environment. This project should be funded and seen as an example of good stewardship of the public/private funds for public use. Matt Boyd - 4/3/2020


These trails are a blast to ride and always in need of some work. They bring people and jobs into the small communities which helps the small economy live. Jared - 4/3/2020


The trails system in the Downieville area has provided years of outdoor enjoyment for myself, my family, and numerous friends. The hard work of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in keeping the trails well maintained and safe has been instrumental in this. Please fund SBTS so they can continue the excellent work! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are an important recreational resource in the area. Please fund and support them. They are important because they: 1. Create jobs in two economically struggling counties. 2. Create recreational opportunities for people in the counties and the surrounding area. This brings dollars in to further support the local economy. 3. Create environmentally stable and sustainable trails that require less maintenance and minimize any negative environmental impact (e.g.,, erosion and fire hazard). Trails built by SBST standards protect the local watershed. SBST has a proven record of building sustainable, environmentally stable and functional trails. Thank you for the opportunity to provide my comments here. Eric Storne - 4/8/2020


I'm writing to support the grant request for the Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue Team. As you may have read, they are a 100% volunteer organization. No member including the Board of Directors has ever taken payment for there services. You may also know, in there over 45 years of serving the state of California, they have rescued nearly 600 people. Many of these victims have been OHV users including Snowmobilers, Off Road ATV's and Motorcycle users, Snowcat's and Snowbikes. Please help support this very important organization by fulfilling there grant requests. If needed, I'm happy to further discuss why TNSAR is a great organization and a worthy recipient of the grant funds. Sincerely, Chris McConnell Chris McConnell - 3/25/2020


I was born and raised in Tahoe City (58 year resident). I have seen many changes over the years. I retired in 2012 from North Tahoe Fire Protection District, with 33 years of service. I retired at the rank of Captain. I have been a Search and Rescue team member for 33 years, 23 of those with Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue and the other 10 years with Placer County Sheriff's Department-Tahoe. As a professional firefighter and a SAR volunteer I have seen the demand for EMS, Fire, Law and Rescue services grow exponentially not only in Tahoe City, but the entire Lake Tahoe area and beyond. I've seen the demand on volunteers to provide services and specialized equipment that are not available or paid for by the local agencies. These volunteers not only provide time, equipment and expertise, they also conduct fund raising to meet the ever changing financial needs of the organizations they volunteer for. If not for the dedicated members of TNSAR, many backcountry skiers, snowmobilers, ATV/UTV, Jeepers and other back country explorers may have lost their lives waiting to be rescued. I totally support TNSAR and their request for an OHV grant. Respectfully, Brandnew Ray O'Brien Ray O'Brien - 4/6/2020


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