2019/2020 Public Comments to Preliminary Applications

AGENCIES SUBMITTING PRELIMINARY APPLICATIONS

Please click on an agency to view the public comments received for that agency's preliminary application. All agencies submitting preliminary applications are listed below and only those agencies shown in bold received public comments.

BLM FIELD OFFICES

I would like to comment on the Barstow BLM grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed all the applications submitted by this office and find that all these grants will provide much needed management to the vast area covered by this office. Best of luck with your grant and I hope you get fully funded to keep our beautiful desert accessible for the recreating public. Ed Stovin - 4/30/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


The Bishop BLM office has maintained a very good relationship with the local OHV community. We support their efforts to help us maintain our access, improve our trails and protect Mother Nature. Please approve this grant request.mike johnston - 5/1/2020


As part of the OHV community I have had the opportunity to work with this law enforcement unit and they are very helpful. Please approve this grant request.mike johnston - 5/1/2020


I would like to see the Bishop BLM expand their Ground Operations. This year there will be considerable damage due to the immense run off and therefore much needed repair work. They are currently understaffed for the task at hand and will need all the help they can get. Fortunately, they are a great group to partner with. I would like to see expanded pro-active efforts to reinforce the Tread Lightly theme. It would also be good to restore motorized access the north west side of the White Mountains.Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. It is general knowledge in our area that there are very few Law Enforcement Officers patrolling our public lands. While the vast majority of OHV users obey the regulations and respect our public lands, there are those few that do not. The people that violate protective laws on our public lands need to know that Law Enforcement is out there and that they may be caught and prosecuted. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help. Thank You Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this application. I support funding of BLM Ground Operations, but I would like to see an addition to the #1 Trail/Road/Open Area/Track Maintenance section. OHV routes in the Buttermilk/Tungsten and Laws Poleta areas are being used by motorcycles to access new and unauthorized hill climbs and motorcycle single track.I'd like to see "remediation and erasure of unauthorized tracks" added to the list of Deliverables. Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I support funding of BLM Law Enforcement, as presently in the Bishop Area, motorcycle trespass is rampant. In the Proposed Project section, the first sentence lists six geographic areas where OHV rules and regulations and monitor for OHV intrusions will be enforced. What about the desert areas that are not included in those six geographic areas? The Tungsten Hills, for instance, are simply BLM lands--does the list in the first sentence exclude that area from protections? Similarly, the land surrounding the Laws Poleta Open Area, is regularly damaged by motorcycle trespass outside the boundaries of the Open area. Are those areas excluded from Law Enforcement protection? Please remedy this oversight and include all BLM lands in where motorcycle and OHV trespass occurs in this grant funding.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


This application looks very worthwhile for helping with off highway activities in my residence area. One of my long time concerns is in keeping motorized access open to existing roads and trails on public land. In this respect, this grant application helps to achieve this goal. I do have issues with some routes being designated closed or non-existent that should not be so designated. These views are from me as a member of the Eastern Sierra 4x4 Club, a member of the Owens Valley Sneakers Motorcycle Club, and a repeater site (mountaintop) trustee in the Bishop Amateur Radio Club. All of these clubs use peer pressure to train their members in responsible activities on public lands. Unknowing members of the public who are often oblivious to the ramifications of their actions are always a source of trouble for public property -- from the beaches to the desert. Hopefully this grant money will help with these issues.Jon Patzer - 5/4/2020


This application should be funded. Good ground operations, maintenance, service, repair and monitoring to the recreational infrastructure is essential to a rewarding OHV experience. Adequate staffing for the visitor centers and the presence of OHV Park Rangers in the field enhances a visitors experience. It encourages responsible use and preservation of this very valuable natural resourceJohn Shepherd - 5/4/2020


This grant request should be funded. A good level of Law Enforcement presence is absolutely necessary to the safe, reasonable and equitable use of this vital recreational resource. John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


BLM I would like to comment on the El Centro BLM grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed all the applications submitted by this office and find that all these grants will provide much needed management to the vast area covered by this office. I hope all these grants can be funded as fully as possible. I was riding at Lark Canyon a couple months ago and found the restroom was out of paper. A few years ago I found a restroom at the dunes also out of paper on a big holiday. I recommend you add an additional bar of paper to all the restrooms you manage, both at Lark and in the ISDRA and keep them full.Ed Stovin - 5/1/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


please keep off-road vehicles off the desertrichard b perkowski - 4/25/2020


BLM I would like to comment on the Needles Field Office BLM grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed all the applications submitted by this office and find that all these grants will provide much needed management to the vast area covered by this office. I hope all these grants can be funded as fully as possible. I am curious what areas you use TraffX counters to count visitors. In your education grant, you mention "BLM and NFO maintain several webpages that provide a wide range of information to the public." I could only find the one official BLM website. Are there more? Please share with me the links. Your safety application says "Classroom Outreach: Focuses on researching other mediums of public information distribution, updating curricula & the delivery of interactive programs, teaching environmentally responsible principles and responsible OHV operations to schools and community organizations." I would like to know what schools and organizations your office makes presentations to and how often? Seems kind of odd that there is a line item for "Staff-Wilderness Specialist" to help with OHV education. Ed Stovin - 5/1/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


Definitely need more help in enforcing anti dumping in canyons above and around Desert Hot Springs. ThanksRhoads Bill - 4/21/2020


Strong support. Scott Connelly - 4/21/2020


I support this application. I see a lot of violations when I travel these backcountry areas. and more enforcement/education is neededScott Connelly - 4/21/2020


please grant the request to curb the use of off-road vehicles from further destroying the desertrichard b perkowski - 4/25/2020


I would like to comment on the Palm Springs Field Office BLM grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed all the applications submitted by this office and find that all these grants will provide much needed management to the vast area covered by this office. I hope all these grants can be funded as fully as possible. Please tell Doug I was hoping to see a planning grant to make a concentrated OHV use area. Maybe next year? Remember to just reach out if you need any help.Ed Stovin - 5/1/2020


**Support As Submitted** BLM RFO has shown proper use of funds over the decades, and is OHV oriented to the OHV community overall. They do a fantastic job for California families. David Pickett as individual and past D36MCSC Inc. LAO Director. DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT** I support Law Enforcement, and encourage Education over Citation when possible and makes sense. LE is a critical component in support of mandated CA PRC codes... David Pickett as an individual and past D36MCSC Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


BLM I would like to comment on the Palm Springs Field Office BLM grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed all the applications submitted by this office and find that all these grants will provide much needed management to the vast area covered by this office. I hope all these grants can be funded as fully as possible. You guys manage an awful lot of OHV opportunity, thanks for working to keep it open and viable for us. If you ever have phone or Zoom calls about OHV areas, I would love to listen in.Ed Stovin - 5/1/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


**SUPPORT** This grant, as laid out makes sense especially in meeting Public Resource Codes to keep the area viable for managed and environmentally compliant as defined in application. Please fund this Grant. David Pickett as individual and past D36MCSP Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT AS SUBMITTED** Law Enforcement Grants are critical to managed OHV recreation areas. While I believe in Education over Citation where appropriate, law enforcement is much more than this. Support, Dave Pickett as individual and past D36MCSP Inc. LAO Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


**SUPPORT AS SUBMITTED** BLM has been a good partner to the OHV program, and this grant is no different. Ukiah Field Office faces challenges in the area, along with expansion for OHV recreation opportunities in this well liked recreation area. Mother Nature has not been kind to this area due to factors above and beyond this field offices control with fires, etc. I support this Grant. David Pickett as an individual & and past D36MCSC Inc. Leg Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


 

NATIONAL PARKS SERVICE

First I do not think it appropriate for a Federal agency to request state funds. The park does not allow green sticker motor vehicle operation. Giving funds collected from green sticker fees to a park that does not allow green sticker operation should be denied. This project does nothing for the OHV community besides take the funding away from projects that deserve it. Robert Bitner - 3/4/2020


I'm NOT in favor of Death Valley using OHV monies for restoration as Death Valley does not allow green and red sticker OHV... my vote is NO Joe Rodriguez - 3/3/2020


Death Valley National park is an excellent steward of millions of acres of the California desert and very deserving of a grant to help with illegal off road activity that puts scars on its beautiful scenery. Jonathan Shelley - 3/3/2020

Because of the size and remoteness of much of Death Valley, it can be difficult to monitor and prevent illegal off-road use in these beautiful and unique areas. The grant would help for this. Sue Eipert - 3/7/2020

I think using Green Sticker grant funds to enable restoration at Death Valley is a creative idea and badly needed. I live near Death Valley and hike or tourist there frequently. I saw the off road vehicle damage at the Racetrack and near Badwater, and during the most recent government shutdown, saw people driving off road on the playa in the valley. Been coming to Death Valley for many years; can't remember so much off road damage as in last few years. Seems only fitting that OHV money help restore the damage that off road folks cause. And I particularly like the prevention component of the proposal, a smart use of money so they won't have to come back and ask for restoration funds. Stopping damage before it happens is always better for everyone involved! B. Bane - 3/9/2020


DVNP is requesting funding for restoration projects that clearly meet the requirements of the regulations. The proposal includes the specific sites that would be funded, along with the specific work on the projects (restoration, monitoring, signage, fencing, barriers). These projects will restore natural resource systems to their natural state when unauthorized motor vehicle use has damaged an area off limits to OHV recreation. National Parks are the crown jewels of America’s public lands. Preventing illegal off-road driving in the park is critical. These funds will assist in preventing others from following in the tracks of those who have traveled off-road illegally. DVNP’s grant proposal clearly meets all the requirements outlined in the regulations and should be fully funded. S Goss, for Sierra Club CA Desert Comm - 3/24/2020


These comments are submitted on behalf of Desert Survivors (DS), a 501c(3) non profit organization whose mission is promote preservation of our wild desert lands. DS supports the grant request be fully funded to Death Valley National Park (DVNP.) Our members and officers have visited DVNP and the surrounding country for many decades. Along with a rise in visitation, sadly we have also seen an increase in damage due to illegal Off Highway Vehicle trespass. Left unchecked, this damage will further degrade the wild and cultural values of our national heritage. The monies DVNP is requesting for restoration projects clearly meet the requirements of the regulations. The proposal includes specific sites that would be funded, as well as the specific work projects (restoration, monitoring, signage, fencing, barriers) for the identified sites. Besides restoring natural resource systems to their condition prior to vehicle trespass, these grant monies will aid DVNP staff in forestalling future damage as well as enhancing their response capabilities. Preventing illegal off-road driving in the park is critical. These funds will assist in preventing others from unknowingly following in the tracks of trespassers. DVNP’s grant proposal should be fully funded. David McMullen Director at Large, Desert Survivors - 3/24/2020


As some public comments have pointed out, the non street legal OHV (green sticker) vehicles are prohibited in Death Valley but unfortunately the entire OHV community gets a black eye due to any trespasses. Many trespass tracks are caused by passenger vehicles, SUVs, dual sports, 4x4s, trucks and some green sticker vehicles. The bottom line is that we all need to pitch in to clean up these problem areas and to prevent further abuses. It is important that the message is very clear that the OHV (green sticker)community is doing more than any other group to help our Public Lands agencies! We should all support this grant request and assist in protecting our public lands thereby preventing further loss of access for all OHV types.mike johnston - 5/1/2020


To Whom It May Concern, I am a long time OHV rider and user of public lands that provide opportunities for OHV use. I enjoy riding motorcycles in the Mojave Desert and regularly ride in Red Rock Canyon State Park and around the El Paso Wilderness area. Another personal favorite is Death Valley National Park (DVNP). Unfortunately, DVNP does not allow OHV’s. All vehicles must be street legal. As taken from DVNP’s website: Off-road driving is NOT allowed in Death Valley National Park. Vehicles, including bicycles, are restricted to the 785 miles of established open roads. Death Valley features both paved and dirt high-clearance and 4X4 roads in the park, open to all street-legal, licensed vehicles. To protect the fragile and beautiful desert environment for future generations of visitors, Death Valley National Park does not allow OHV (Off Highway Vehicle) use within park boundaries. ATVs, Quads, Dune Buggies, Sand Rails and California "Green Sticker" vehicles may not be operated in the park. Source: www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/off-road-driving.htm From the State of California’s OHV website their mission statement states: The Mission of the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR) Division is to provide leadership statewide in the area of off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation; to acquire, develop, and operate state-owned vehicular recreation areas; and to otherwise provide for a statewide system of managed OHV recreational opportunities through funding to other public agencies. The OHMVR Division works to ensure quality recreational opportunities remain available for future generations by providing for education, conservation, and enforcement efforts that balance OHV recreation impacts with programs that conserve and protect cultural and natural resources. Source: http://ohv.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=1246 DVNP is requesting grant monies from the State of California’s OHV trust fund for services/employees/improvements to its park that strictly prohibits the use of any and all OHV’s. This request in direct conflict to the mission statement of the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division. Therefore, I am submitting this letter adamantly opposing the granting of any monies to any agency that strictly prohibits the use of OHV’s within its boundaries. This includes DVNP. Sincerely, Tim Mathos Tim Mathos - 5/3/2020


Thank you the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I am in full support of funding the Death Valley National Park effort to remediate and protect the National Park from OHV damage. As Inyo County and the Inyo National Forest propose expansion of the Adventure Trails program into areas adjacent to the Park, the issue of trespass damage will only increase. Death Valley National Park deserves the funding to fix the damage that has already occurred, and be ready to remediate future damage. If this comment box allowed photos, I'd be including some of ATV tracks entering the Park in the Joshua Flat area.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


This grant request should be funded. As discussed in the request signage, public education, restoration and monitoring is essential in preservation of this unique natural resource. Increasing the level of knowledge and understanding of proper use of the resources of DVNP coupled with restoration of "hot spots" will help preserve the visitor experience for generations to come (full disclosure - I am a life member of the DVNHA) John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020

JTNP has seen a tremendous increase in visitation over the past several years. This has led to a significant increase in the amount of illegal OHV incursions. This proposal by the park will allow them to create a system-wide plan to address the problem, instead of playing whack-a-mole. The park realizes that they need to take a proactive approach to the issue and this grant will allow them to start the process. In January, our group spent 2 days installing barriers with park personnel in an effort to reduce illegal OHV impact in Berdoo Canyon. Driving to and from the worksite each day, we saw many other areas that needed our attention as well. This grant will allow the park to gain a better understanding of what is needed going forward and should be fully funded. S Goss, on behalf of Desert Survivors - 4/2/2020


Please see linked public comment document. Ed Larue - 4/27/2020


DESERT TORTOISE COUNCIL 4654 East Avenue S #257B Palmdale, California 93552 www.deserttortoise.org eac@deserttortoise.org via California State Parks comment portal and email April 25, 2020 Sixto J. Fernandez, Grants Manager Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program California State Parks Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division 1725 23rd Street, Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95816 Sixto.Fernandez@parks.ca.gov RE: Letter of Support for the Grant Program: GCA-19, Agency: NPS – Joshua Tree National Park, Project: Restoration Plan for Joshua Tree (Federal ID 53-0197094) Dear Mr. Fernandez: The Desert Tortoise Council (Council) is a non-profit organization comprised of hundreds of professionals and laypersons who share a common concern for wild desert tortoises and a commitment to advancing the public’s understanding of these species. Established in 1975 to promote conservation of tortoise species in the deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico, the Council routinely provides information to individuals, organizations, and regulatory agencies on matters potentially affecting desert tortoises within their geographic ranges. This is a Letter of Support to fund the Preliminary Grant Application submitted by the National Park Service (NPS) for Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR) for development of a comprehensive management/treatment plan (Plan) for existing illegal off-highway motor vehicle (OHV) incursions under the Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program – 2019-2020. The Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program (Grants Program) supports the planning, acquisition, development, maintenance, administration, operation, enforcement, restoration, and conservation of trails, trailheads, areas, and other facilities associated with the use of OHVs, and programs involving OHV safety or education. Funding this request would enable JOTR to create a comprehensive work plan with guidelines for restoration treatments, mapping OHV damage, signage, and outreach to prevent future damage. This Plan would be implemented in an area with a population of federally and State-threatened Agassiz’s desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) (synonymous with “Mojave desert tortoise”) and its habitat. Below are the reasons why we strongly request that you fund this grant application: 1. JOTR has a history of completing projects funded by California State Parks OHV grants program. California State Parks Off-highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Grants program funded a JOTR grant application, G16-05-01-R01, for an individual project that was successfully implemented. 2. As an indication of its intent to produce a comprehensive work plan, JOTR has conducted preliminary work on OHV use within its boundary including data collection to determine the locations and extent of illegal incursions in JOTR. JOTR has mapped 265 miles of OHV incursions from 708 occurrences. 3. The amount/extent of illegal OHV incursion stresses the need for restoration, education, and enforcement of OHV activity in JOTR. The land status within JOTR is mostly designated wilderness or areas managed for natural and cultural resources. While there are approximately 207 miles of public roads within JOTR, including 141 miles of dirt roads, the 265 miles of illegal incursions demonstrate that there are more miles of illegal incursions in JOTR than there are miles of legal roadways. OHV damage has become widespread and frequent in JOTR. Consequently, there is an urgent need to effectively reduce/eliminate these incursions, educate the public, and restore damaged resources. 4. JOTR is requesting funding to develop a comprehensive plan for effective management of illegal OHV incursions. Rather than tackling each illegal OHV incursion on a case-by-case basis, JOTR has decided that the best approach is the development (and ultimately implementation) of a comprehensive management plan based on the collection and assessment of data on the types and locations of illegal OHV incursions. 5. JOTR would produce a product — a comprehensive management plan with three chapters. Chapter 1 would contain detailed written restoration treatment specifications and maps for OHV damage hot spots. Chapter 2 would describe a patrol plan. Chapter 3 would be a written outreach strategy focused on changing the behavior of visitors so that future OHV damage is prevented, and restored areas are protected from future damage. 6. JOTR’s product incorporates an interdisciplinary approach of restoration, education, engineering, and enforcement to ensure its success. 7. The comprehensive management plan includes monitoring. The application includes language that staff would “map new incursions and monitor treatments using a GPS data collection device.” This monitoring would provide data on the effectiveness of the restoration treatments and physical barriers and the implementation of the education/outreach/patrol plan. 8. JOTR’s comprehensive management plan may serve as a template for other land management agencies/organizations to use in the development/revision of their management of OHV use within their jurisdictions. 9. JOTR’s grant application identifies special status species and special management areas that would ultimately benefit from implementation of its comprehensive management plan. Within its 800,000 acres, 83% is wilderness. JOTR preserves habitat for the desert tortoise, fully protected golden eagle, two species of federally listed plants, 46 plant species considered rare by the State of California, and for sensitive desert bighorn sheep. JOTR also preserves historic resources, including paleontological sites, more than 838 documented archeological sites, 160 historic structures, and 5 cultural landscapes. In addition, the California Fish and Game Commission will decide in June whether to accept the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s recommendation and declare the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) a candidate for listing. 10. Some of the most apparent threats to the Mojave desert tortoise are those that fragment and degrade habitats, such as OHV activity (USFWS 2011). The desert tortoise takes 15 to 20 years to reach sexual maturity, has a large home range and low recruitment rate, and has crucial habitat components (e.g., soils for burrowing, native herbaceous vegetation for nutrition, and woody plant cover for protection from temperature extremes and predation, etc.). Degradation and destruction from illegal OHV incursions result in tortoise and tortoise habitat components taking decades or longer to recover from these incursions (Boarman 2002, Lovich and Bainbridge 1999). Piecemeal, short-term restoration efforts to “fix” illegal OHV incursions do not result in a long-term benefit to the tortoise, its habitat, or other desert species with similar needs. A comprehensive management plan to restore desert habitat for the long term is needed. JOTR’s comprehensive management plan is such an approach. 11. JOTR is within the Colorado Desert Recovery Unit for the desert tortoise (USFWS 2011) and is a Tortoise Conservation Area (TCA) (BLM 2016). It is adjacent to the Pinto Mountain TCA and designated critical habitat for the tortoise (USFWS 1994). Thus, development of a comprehensive management plan to restore tortoise habitat and deter illegal OHV incursions will, when implemented, benefit the tortoise in JOTR and provide linkages to other areas designated for the long-term conservation of the federally- and state-threatened tortoise and other special status species including the golden eagle, burrowing owl, and American badger, among others. 12. We are disheartened that a “Restoration Planning” grant application receives few points in the grant application process. As the application from JOTR mentions, the absence of a comprehensive management plan to address all the impacts (e.g., to air, noise, soils, water, vegetation, wildlife, and cultural resources) from illegal OHV incursions will result in short-lived success at reducing these incursions and no success for environmental restoration/protection. Successful planning is the foundation of successful implementation. If the effects to natural and cultural resources were considered in the points awarded for Restoration Planning projects, we estimate that the JOTR grant application would receive an additional 18 points for the Natural and Cultural Resources section alone. We urge the Grants and Cooperative Agreement Program managers to revise the point system to reflect the importance of this planning need. For the above stated reasons, we believe that the Preliminary Grant Application by the National Park Service from Joshua Tree National Park for the “Restoration Plan for Joshua Tree” should be fully funded. Regards, Edward L. LaRue, Jr., M.S. Desert Tortoise Council, Ecosystems Advisory Committee, Chairperson Literature Cited Boarman, W.I. 2002. Threats to Desert Tortoise Populations: A Critical Review of the Literature. U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center, San Diego Field Station, San Diego, CA. Prepared for West Mojave Planning Team, Bureau of Land Management. https://www.fws.gov/nevada/desert_tortoise/documents/misc/tortoise_threats_boarman_usgs_2002.pdf [BLM] U.S. Bureau of Land Management. 2016. Record of Decision for the Land Use Plan Amendment to the California Desert Conservation Plan, Bishop Resource Management Plan, and Bakersfield Resource Management Plan for the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP). Dated September 2016. Sacramento, CA. Lovich, J.E., and D. Bainbridge. 1999. Anthropogenic Degradation of the Southern California Desert Ecosystem and Prospects for Natural Recovery and Restoration. Environmental Management Vol. 24, No. 3, pp. 309–326. [USFWS] U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1994. Determination of critical habitat for the Mojave population of the desert tortoise. 59 Federal Register 5820-5866. [USFWS] U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2011. Revised recovery plan for the Mojave population of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Sacramento, California. 222 pp.


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


US FOREST SERVICE

 

Hello I have I have never commented on this (Forest Seeks Public Comment on Off-Highway Vehicle Grant Application) before, I never knew about it, was never notified or anything like that. What is one suppose to say ? Obviously we have a bunch of Off road people/riders and even campers, Bicyclists and all of that who use these areas and do it legally. So ofcourse we not only want them, but factually need them like any outdoor sport or sports people. I for one only have a green sticker bike, plus 3 or 4 months of riding at times to me that are nowhere near as good or convenient doesn't cut it. Let alone the cost vs allowed time, doesn't equal out well. P.S. Do the red sticker fees/dues go for the same things/reasons ? P.S.S. I got to this page from Cleveland National Forest website from an Alert for Corral Canyon/Bear Valley P.S.S.S I see some of the funds are also for "new riding areas", we definitely need that, more variety etc. AND CLOSER to East County Cities like we used to have, Santee, Lakeside, El Cajon, Alpine etc. Dan. Dan Powers - 4/29/2020


I would like to comment on the Cleveland National Forest grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. In the north I see an entry of $20,000 for trail brushing and light errosion repair and $30,000 for trail repair. This can easily be done with volunteers, probably in one day. I helped lead a very successful trail day at Corral Canyon and would be happy to do the same at Wildomar that would save as much as $50,000 in grant money and would give the Forest many volunteer hours that could be used in match money for next years grants. I would really like to see Wildomar expand opportunities with a planning grant application to add more trail mileage. Eight miles is hardly enough to be worth the drive out there. Over at Corral Canyon, I have been fortunate to be able to work with Lindsey, Gabe and Richard in maintaining the OHV area. I have helped with several area work days and am pleased to see the hours go to grant match. I hope the excavator purchased last year has helped keep the trails smooth with all the recent rain. I see a planning grant application. As long as you have NEPA open, would it be possible to add some motorcycle single track to the system? Possibly from Bear Valley Road? If so, I would be glad to assist the Forest any way I can. I'd like to thank the staff for maintaining a great area and I look forward to riding out there and helping any way I can.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


The INF was a big disappointment in the last grant cycle and did a poor job at Pizona. The OHV community was excluded from their site visit but we are optimistic that attitudes are shifting. We had several meetings with the INF regarding this grant request and are very hopeful that things will start moving in the right direction.Mike Johnston - 5/1/2020


The INF was a big disappointment in the last grant cycle and did a poor job at Pizona. The OHV community was excluded from their site visit but we are optimistic that attitudes are shifting. We had several meetings with the INF regarding this grant request and are very hopeful that things will start moving in the right direction.Mike Johnston - 5/1/2020


This is a critical grant to get corrections completed on the 2009 Travel Management (TM) decision. The INF committed to seek continued input from the OHV community to keep the TM relevant and has failed to do this. The TM was a collaborative effort and the collaboration disappeared immediately. This grant will start the process to create a collaboration that is greatly needed. Please approve this grant. Mike Johnston - 5/1/2020


I will recommend this grant only if the INF will work with the OHV community to help determine where, when, why, who and how the restoration will be done. Mike Johnston - 5/1/2020


As one of the many Private Property Inholders in the Monache Meadow Area I am generally supportive of the INF’s Ground Operations Grant Request. However, I do have some serious concerns. Although these comments are specific to the Monache Meadow Area several apply Forest Wide. 1. Of major concern to me and my fellow property owners is the continual reference (as well as implementation) in the Grant Request to the “installation” and “maintenance” activity associated with “rolling dips”. We have serious issue with this road maintenance approach as it has proven ineffective in the Monache Area. Although we agree with the intent to “slow down” vehicle traffic, the rolling dips have just encouraged m/c and 4WD jumping which further deteriorates the Monache roads. A better and sounder way must be implemented. 2. It is suggested that more on site Forest Service oversight be implemented during the Contractor’s (Enterprise Trail) road work. Previous work in the Monache area has been inconsistent. 3. We would encourage the INF to coordinate the Ground Operations Monache Road work with the LEO/FPO activity associated with Grant Request G19-02-39-L01. Hopefully this would provide 100% FS coverage to help manage the OHV traffic coming from the Sequoia National Forest. 4. The main Vehicle / OHV artery in to the Monache Area is INF FS 20S03 a level 2 road with “green sticker” allowed. Access to this road is through the Sequoia National Forrest over what is commonly known as the Monache Jeep Road. The SNF has incorrectly designated this route as a Trail (34E38). Therefore their maintenance is not to the Level 2 standards it should be or consistent with its’ continuation to INF 20S03 road. The lack of SNF maintenance on this segment has created numerous vehicle break downs (including Forest Service Vehicles) and led to many “user” created reroutes. A standard USFS 4WD Type 3 Fire Truck can no longer access Monache as has been in the past (As was the case in 2019 during Broder Fire). The Inyo National Forest is STRONGLY encouraged to coordinate and work with the Sequoia National Forest to gets their portion of the Monache access roadway properly designated as a Level 2 road, green stickers allowed, consistent with the INF designation. Dion Salfen - 5/2/2020


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. Our area is a playground for Los Angeles and OHV activities are a significant part of the tourism that supports the economy in the Eastern Sierra. This grant will help with the management of the OHV resources in our area and is a good use of our "green sticker" funds. Thank You.Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. Our area is a playground for Los Angeles and OHV activities are a significant part of the tourism that supports the economy in the Eastern Sierra. This grant will help with the management of the OHV resources in our area and is a good use of our "green sticker" funds. Thank You.Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. Our area is a playground for Los Angeles and OHV activities are a significant part of the tourism that supports the economy in the Eastern Sierra. This grant will help with the management of the OHV resources in our area and is a good use of our "green sticker" funds. Thank You.Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


This proposal will improve OHV recreation in the INF and should be funded. As a President of the Eastern Sierra 4 Wheel Drive Club, which will be helping with these projects, I endorse the much-needed maintenance and repair work that will be done with the funding. Recent changes in INF management has significantly improved outreach, communication and cooperation with local OHV groups. The INF has been more responsive to inquiries about the specifics of how grant money is spent and has been willing to accept input and help from OHV stakeholders. This is an excellent trend that will hopefully continue in the future. John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


This request for planning should be funded. Planning is the start of the process and the objectives outlined in this request are essential to OHV recreation in the INF. There are numerous problems with the current OHV routes that are well known to the INF and the OHV community. A detailed analysis and recommendations for route improvement will enable sensible, cost effective improvement to the safety and enjoyment of OHV users, projection of the natural resources of the INF, and mitigation of potential damage to the environment. John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


This restoration grant request should be funded. The need for improved signage is especially important to reducing the amount of restoration. As a frequent user of the OHV route system in the INF I am very familiar with issues of inadequate signage and maps. It is without question, major contributor of use of unauthorized routes. Public education and participation of the OHV user community is also vital. If the locals are often confused about which routes are open or closed an occasional visitor can inadvertently use a closed route easily. I agree with the need for restoration; however, a strategic, well implemented signage and public education program would significantly decrease the need for such activities. The local OHV community, specifically the Eastern Sierra 4 Wheel Drive Club, would like to provide more information and recommendations on improving signage. A system to accept input from knowledgeable individuals efficiently should be added to the objectives of this request. John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I support funding this grant proposal, and I have some specific suggestions for improving it. Regarding #1 of Project Deliverables, Trail/Road/Open Area/Track Maintenance I'd like to see the Remediation and Erasure of OHV trespasses included in the proposed maintenance description. Specifically, nearly a dozen new motorcycle hillclimbs and single track trespasses have occurred in the Buttermilk and Lower Bishop Creek areas. These need to be addressed before soils, vegetation, and wildlife are permanently damaged. Regarding #3, Signing, signage along the Buttermilk/Tungsten Loops has been removed--specifically, the end points signage. This has resulted in "unknowing" OHV trespass. If this comment box allowed photos, I'd be including photos of obsidian points that were unearthed by a motorcycle trespass, hill climbs creating deep troughs in the earth, torn moss and lichen on slickrock areas...Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. While I am in favor of all other grant proposals this year--I am not a fan of this one. Funding for the Coyote OHV recreational area should be postponed until trespass problems in nearby OHV areas can be adequately addressed. Specifically, the Buttermilk/Tungsten Loops which reside not far from the proposed Coyote OHV area is rife with problems. While much OHV use in the Buttermilk/Tungsten area is benign, serious damage is occurring due to motorcycle trespasses. Motorcycles are using the Buttermilk/Tungsten loops to access newly created hill climbs and singletrack trail. A citizens group has documented over a dozen such trespasses. These trails have damaged vegetation, soils, cultural resources and have impacted wildlife and other recreational users. Law Enforcement, restoration funding--none of it has slowed the damage or the proliferation. Until the Inyo NF can find a way to protect the resources on the White Mountain Ranger District, new projects don't make sense. Another reason for NOT funding this expansion project, is that the Coyote Loop depends on segments of road that will need to be included in the AB628 combined use pilot project. That Pilot Project is widely opposed and set to expire in 2025. If grant money is invested in this project, and parts of the "loop" become unavailable to OHV traffic in 2025, the incomplete loop will be another opportunity for OHV trespass and damage. Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I fully support every aspect of this project. The Buttermilk/Tungsten Loops area is in desperate need of this restoration work. Motorcycles, and a few ATVs, are damaging off road areas--hill climbs, creek and drainage riding, and shortcuts are contributing to damaged soils, vegetation, cultural resources, and upsetting wildlife and humans. I hope this grant is fully funded, in fact I hope all the money requested for G19-02-05-P01 Planning is redirected into this much needed effort.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


Dear Sixto and Ross On behalf of Advocates for Access to Public Lands (AAPL) it is with great disappointment that I have to oppose the grants that Inyo National Forest has applied for. AAPL and other groups worked hard and in good faith to provide detailed specifics on projects that have been needed for years on the Inyo but for whatever reason have not been included in past grants or in this grant. In meetings specifically related to this grant application, the members of AAPL and the other user groups spent a tremendous amount of time, on the ground, to identify exactly where work was needed. We also identified roads that had been closed for no apparent reason i.e. the “Peterson Mine Road” in Coyote with the understanding that it would be included in the Planning Grant, it was not. As we have said in the past, the lack of specificity in the grant application makes it impossible to make sure there is accountability for projects that are in the interest of the OHV community. This year the local OHV community had real optimism that there was a cultural change at Inyo National Forest that would begin to address the real needs of that community. As I said the OHV community spent hours upon hours documenting those needs and meeting to discuss those needs. It was our impression they would finally be addressed but in the end they were again ignored and it is that that requires us to oppose the grants as proposed. We see nothing but a degradation of the OHV experience that will occur if any money is given to INF. Sincerely, Randy Short, President AAPL Randy Short - 5/4/2020


Dear Sixto and Ross On behalf of Advocates for Access to Public Lands (AAPL) it is with great disappointment that I have to oppose the grants that Inyo National Forest has applied for. AAPL and other groups worked hard and in good faith to provide detailed specifics on projects that have been needed for years on the Inyo but for whatever reason have not been included in past grants or in this grant. In meetings specifically related to this grant application, the members of AAPL and the other user groups spent a tremendous amount of time, on the ground, to identify exactly where work was needed. We also identified roads that had been closed for no apparent reason i.e. the “Peterson Mine Road” in Coyote with the understanding that it would be included in the Planning Grant, it was not. As we have said in the past, the lack of specificity in the grant application makes it impossible to make sure there is accountability for projects that are in the interest of the OHV community. This year the local OHV community had real optimism that there was a cultural change at Inyo National Forest that would begin to address the real needs of that community. As I said the OHV community spent hours upon hours documenting those needs and meeting to discuss those needs. It was our impression they would finally be addressed but in the end they were again ignored and it is that that requires us to oppose the grants as proposed. We see nothing but a degradation of the OHV experience that will occur if any money is given to INF. Sincerely, Randy Short, President AAPL Randy Short - 5/4/2020


Dear Sixto and Ross On behalf of Advocates for Access to Public Lands (AAPL) it is with great disappointment that I have to oppose the grants that Inyo National Forest has applied for. AAPL and other groups worked hard and in good faith to provide detailed specifics on projects that have been needed for years on the Inyo but for whatever reason have not been included in past grants or in this grant. In meetings specifically related to this grant application, the members of AAPL and the other user groups spent a tremendous amount of time, on the ground, to identify exactly where work was needed. We also identified roads that had been closed for no apparent reason i.e. the “Peterson Mine Road” in Coyote with the understanding that it would be included in the Planning Grant, it was not. As we have said in the past, the lack of specificity in the grant application makes it impossible to make sure there is accountability for projects that are in the interest of the OHV community. This year the local OHV community had real optimism that there was a cultural change at Inyo National Forest that would begin to address the real needs of that community. As I said the OHV community spent hours upon hours documenting those needs and meeting to discuss those needs. It was our impression they would finally be addressed but in the end they were again ignored and it is that that requires us to oppose the grants as proposed. We see nothing but a degradation of the OHV experience that will occur if any money is given to INF. Sincerely, Randy Short, President AAPL Randy Short - 5/4/2020


Dear Sixto and Ross On behalf of Advocates for Access to Public Lands (AAPL) it is with great disappointment that I have to oppose the grants that Inyo National Forest has applied for. AAPL and other groups worked hard and in good faith to provide detailed specifics on projects that have been needed for years on the Inyo but for whatever reason have not been included in past grants or in this grant. In meetings specifically related to this grant application, the members of AAPL and the other user groups spent a tremendous amount of time, on the ground, to identify exactly where work was needed. We also identified roads that had been closed for no apparent reason i.e. the “Peterson Mine Road” in Coyote with the understanding that it would be included in the Planning Grant, it was not. As we have said in the past, the lack of specificity in the grant application makes it impossible to make sure there is accountability for projects that are in the interest of the OHV community. This year the local OHV community had real optimism that there was a cultural change at Inyo National Forest that would begin to address the real needs of that community. As I said the OHV community spent hours upon hours documenting those needs and meeting to discuss those needs. It was our impression they would finally be addressed but in the end they were again ignored and it is that that requires us to oppose the grants as proposed. We see nothing but a degradation of the OHV experience that will occur if any money is given to INF. Sincerely, Randy Short, President AAPL Randy Short - 5/4/2020


To: Sixto & Ross From Randy Gillespie ATS Adventure Trails System of the Eastern Sierra After reviewing the Inyo National Forest’s ground op grant request, I find it interesting that there is no mention of the Coyote area. We (ATS,AAPL, ES4WD club and members of the public) have spent a lot of time meeting with the Inyo Forest and also site visits and field trips to Coyote the past 3-4 years. Each time they claim they will put in their grant to fix the problems that need to be fix. There are wash outs, road erosion and a large mud bog area that needs repair. There is a loop trail that goes from Bishop to Big Pine that is identified in the CTUC map that has not been passable in 4 years because of this mud bog area. I'm disappointed that these areas are not in their grant as promise. Coyote is the most visited area in the Inyo Forest but has been left dangerous for most of the public to enjoy. This area is a priority. Randy Gillespie ATS Randy Gillespie - 5/4/2020


Thank you the opportunity to comment. I want this to be very clear. Please do NOT fund this grant request. Reasons stated below: The Inyo National Forest (INF) is requesting funding for four separate grants - Ground Ops., Planning, Restoration and Law Enforcement. The total grant amount requested totals $1,195,106. The Planning project deliverables include 1) Plan a versatile, sustainable, high quality OHV route system, 2) Analyze all OHV routes and plan up to 13 miles of new OHV routes, reroutes and bypasses including three to five miles of new trails or reroutes, 3) Identify sites appropriate for specialized technical trails and 4) The completion of the various surveys and analyses necessary for a NEPA document and the document itself among other items. This project would be a very significant undertaking. The application does not provide specifics but it is clear that it is expected to attract new users and be able to accommodate the increase in usage. With increased usage will come a small percentage of those that do not respect the land, cause damage, hill climbs, etc. but that damage is remarkable and of consequence. The INF Law Enforcement application states that “OHV law enforcement on the Forest continues to be a critical need. The lack of certified law enforcement presence on much of the Forest OHV system resulted in an almost ‘lawless’ condition…” It also states that the Coyote Plateau is one of the eight Off Route Travel Concern areas. So, why the Planning grant request? The two applications, Planning and Law Enforcement, are inconsistent with each other. Increasing OHV usage and then applying for more funds to control it is not logical and is not a good use of grant funds. Since OHV damage is already a problem on the forest, it makes sense to approve the Law Enforcement request but NOT the Planning request. A second issue has to do with stakeholders. This project was developed around the interests of one stakeholder - Eastern Sierra 4WD Club. I have no issue with the club; it does good work but it is a single stakeholder. All stakeholders should have been included in the project development. For example, the activities of hiking and birding (listed in Q3 of the application) are not consistent with OHVs and their interests were not represented. In Q4, one of the organizations listed was not a party to developing this project. It may have attended a meeting but was not part of the planning. A project of this scope should represent the interests of all parties that recreate on the Coyote Plateau. As an item of interest, when the INF formalized its route system approximately 10 years ago, it did exactly what I have suggested above. It convened a group of people representing all of the various interests in the route system, formalized that group into a team, the Collaborative Alternative Team, and used it to analyze each and every road segment and present recommendations to the Forest Supervisor. The Forest Supervisor accepted the team’s recommendations and that is the route system we have today. I was a member of that team and have great difficulty with a single party being able to make changes to that route system at the expense of others. For the reasons listed above, please DO NOT FUND the Planning grant request. The money can be put to good use elsewhere. Thank you for your consideration, Bill Mitchel Bishop, CA Bil Mitchel - 5/4/2020


This is a much needed project. I have seen the disregard for old routes that are being restored in many places on the forest. Persistence will pay off. Bill Mitchel Bishop, CABil Mitchel - 5/4/2020


This is a solid operations grant that deserves funding. I was just at Baxter Spring yesterday. The Forest desperately needs road maintenance funds. My only comment would be that Baxter and other roads that have been eroded by not just recreationists, but also livestock permittees, should have the cost of their maintenance split between rec dollars and grazing dollars. Too often recreation folks get blamed for problems they may not have created. This is the case with a crossing like Baxter. It didn't use to be as bad as it is today before the area was so heavily sheeped. That said, this is a solid grant that will provide needed funds to sustain recreational opportunities on the Forest while protecting watershed and habitat health. thanks, Paul McFarlandPaul McFarland - 5/4/2020


Dear Division Staff - Thank you for this opportunity to provide comments on this important program. I am concerned that this planning grant application by the Inyo National Forest may actually cause more harm that good unless it goes back to the drawing board. First, I am not sure there is a way to "develop sustainable OHV recreation on the Coyote Plateau." The Coyote Plateau contains a unique disjunct expanse of alpine and subalpine habitat. This open, fragile country presents few barriers to cross county travel as evidenced by the continuing trespass of vehicles beyond closure signs and barriers toward an overlook of Green Lake in the southwestern portion of the plateau. Reason I say a sustainable opportunity can't be developed is because a sustainable system is never 'developed.' Any truly sustainable recreationally resource needs to be managed. There is little to no management presence on across the Inyo, none the less on this hard to reach plateau. This lack of management presence is not the fault of any user or user group, but simply the large extent of land on the Forest and the lack of resources to manage them. The best way to improve management on the Coyote Plateau would be to build a backcountry ranger cabin and put a ranger up there with a side-by-side from May to October. A person who cared for the place would do more good than any changes to the current designated system of roads and trails. I am sure there are improvements that could be made to the road system on Coyote, but if these are to be considered they should be done so in the context of both adding and subtracting from the existing network. The current proposal seems only to add. Without a holistic look involving broad stakeholder input and real money to manage what's considered, this grant seem problematic. The Coyote Plateau is simply too fragile a place to create new motorized opportunity without a sure fire mechanism to manage with real, on the ground people, what is proposed to be built. As we've all heard the old baseball player say, "If you build it they will come." Well, they are already here and more are coming and we can barely manage what we have. Anything new deserve a very strong look and a solid plan to manage both what's here and what will come. Perhaps these funds would be better spent putting people on the ground to enhance and sustain the existing recreational and ecological resources we enjoy today rather than create something we may not be able to manage tomorrow. Respectfully, Paul McFarlandPaul McFarland - 5/4/2020


Dear Ohv Division Staff - Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this critical statewide program to sustain well-managed motorized access to our public lands. This Restoration grant by the Inyo National Forest deserve full funding. The program of monitoring and active ongoing restoration described in this grant and long undertaken by the Inyo National Forest should be a model for every land manager. When coupled with an active program of ongoing route maintenance, signage and user education, active restoration of routes and impacts outside a legally-designated system of roads and trails is the only way to ensure a future for public lands recreation. Thank you for providing the oversight and management of these important funds across the great state of California, and helping the Inyo National Forest care for the Eastern Sierra. Respectfully, Paul McFarland Paul McFarland - 5/4/2020


This is a popular area for many users- ohv, man bike, hikers and dog walkers. The bridge has been out for many years, replacing this bridge for multi use is needed for safety, user enjoyment as well as water quality. Than you for replacing the bridge!Teresa - 3/4/2020



May 3, 2020 California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Division 1725 23rd St Ste 200 Sacramento, CA 95816 To Whom It May Concern, My name is Ben Ellis. As an avid OHV rider who has enjoyed the trail system in the Mendocino National Forest for 40+ years with my two sons. In addition to recreational riding, I have participated in various trail maintenance projects on a volunteer basis. I am writing today to comment on the 2020 OHV Grant Funding Proposal. The Mendocino National Forest has a strong history of using OHV grants to maintain and enhance the 247 miles of OHV trails. However, the 2018 CampFire caused significant damage throughout the trail system. The 2020 Grant Funding is vital to reconstructing the trail infrastructure and providing a safe sustainable environment. For instance, the funding will support the much needed removal of hazards, repairing trail tread, and rebuilding bridges. Please support the funding of this work fully allowing my sons to enjoy this incredible place on Earth with their families. If you have questions, please contact me. Sincerely, Ben Ellis (bellis46@yahoo.com) 10310 Beardon Drive Cupertino, CA 95014 408 859-7210 Ben Ellis - 5/3/2020


Hi, there - Just want to let you know we do use these roads. Thanks for the heads up. Laurel Marsters - High Country Unit Backcountry Horsemen - 3/12/2020


Diane Uchytil let me know of this situation. I am from Milford and I ride all of the area from Janesville Grade to Doyle Grade. Please keep these roads accessible to vehicles, off road ATVs and especially horses. Our family uses all of these methods of travel and also camp and hike. Our High Unit Backcountry Horsemen group also are active in helping keep trails open. We are available to do hand work or pack in crews with our pack animals. Please keep us in mind when you need some volunteer help. We have been active in the Caribou and South Warner Wilderness. I really hope we can do more in our Plumas. We also helped with Meadowview Campground. Thank you for your time. Sandy Jansen - 3/12/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


I agree with this grant. The Mt. Hough trail system is very enjoyable to ride. As a moto rider I really appreciate the layout of the trails. SBTS has been doing an amazing job with regards to the trail system. These trails need to be maintained. Thank you, John D. Pellizzer 2020 President of NCWRJohn Pellizzer - 4/15/2020


I used to love backed up to Claremont and use all the roads to walk and recreate. It would be amazing to have a Claremont trail system not only for residents to be able to be more careful and safe off the forest service roads, but would keep more locals in town when they want to recreate. Along with that it could only help bring more revenue to our small businesses in town when out of towners realize Plumas county is a great place to Recreate and start coming with their families.Jacquline Tardif - 5/3/2020


Creating more trail systems would be great for our community. More trail development brings more tourism to our area which in turn helps our area create a more sustainable economy. It also allows our residents a wider world to explore from our immediate homes. Recreation helps create a healthier lifestyle for anyone doing it. Plumas county can really benefit from more trails. Ask yourself “why not” and “what can it hurt?”. Thank you for taking the time to listen.Jacquline Tardif - 5/3/2020


I would like to comment on the San Bernardino National Forest grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. This is a great forest to go off-roading in. I get in a couple trips a year and love it. I like how well the forest is managed for OHV with the right amount of signs and lots of trails. Even though this is a huge grant, it takes a lot to manage this much opportunity. I see you have 9000 hours of volunteer time. That is a huge number, we worked pretty hard to get 1200 hours at the Cleveland NF, so hats off to you. I think that might be easier when you have a staff dedicated to adopt a trail volunteers partners. I see you have site stewards. I am curious how many you have and if they were trained under CASSP? I am interested in bringing a CASSP training session to the Cleveland. I'm just looking for money to make it happen. I'm not sure about the math on the Staff-Visitor Center Front-liner staff at the visitor center. If we say they are open 350 days a year (365 minus holidays) times 8 hours a day is is 2800 hours time 25% is 700, less than the 1000 hours in the application. The application mentions 40 different adopt a trail clubs and then lists seven of them. 40 is a lot of clubs, I would love to know who they all are. This is a big forest with lots of visitors. The only way to keep sustainable OHV there is with lots of management and that costs money. This is a big grant, but needs funding to insure continued access for for all us off-roaders.Ed Stovin - 5/3/2020


OHMVR Grants Committee, I am writing on behalf of the 13,300 member Pacific Crest Trail Association (PCTA). PCTA is the Forest Service’s primary private partner in the management and maintenance of the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT). The foundation for this private-public partnership in the operation of National Scenic Trails dates back to the 1968 National Trails System Act. Section 11 of the Act, titled “Volunteer Trails Assistance” states in Sec. 11(a), “… the head of any Federal agency administering Federal lands, are authorized to encourage volunteers and volunteer organizations to plan, develop, maintain, and manage, where appropriate, trails throughout the Nation.” Sec. 11(b) continues, “Each Secretary or the head of any Federal land managing agency, may assist volunteers and volunteer organizations in planning, developing, maintaining, and managing trails.” As such, it is PCTA’s role to work with the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and California State Parks to ensure the best possible management of the PCT and the experience it affords trail users, year-round. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the OHMVR Grant project proposals. This project has the potential to affect the experiences of thousands of PCT users, primarily hikers and horseback riders by impacting safety, and visual resources of the PCT Management Area, in the Deep Creek Area and Deep Creek Inventoried Roadless Area. Users of the PCT, as well as the public at large, will be relying the restoration and monitoring activities, the addition of signage and fencing/barriers, and public outreach to restore and enhance the resources and values which make the PCT such an incredible experience and phenomenal public resource, and why it was designated as a National Scenic Trail by Congress in 1968. Anitra Kass - 5/4/2020


The following comments are being submitted on behalf of the numerous Private Property inholders, range permitees, seasonal hunters, fisherman and the many Recreational Users that require reasonable access to the Monache Meadows Complex within the Inyo National Forest. WE REQUEST THAT ALL GROUND OPS REQUESTS SUBMITTED BY THE KERN RIVER RANGER DISTRICT ASSOCIATED WITH THE KERN PLEATEAU BE DENIED BY THE OHV COMMISSION. I am an Inholder with private property within the Sequoia National Forest. Access to our property requires transit through the SNF via the Monache Jeep Road (34E38), continuing into the Inyo National Forest via Forest Service Roads (20S03 – 20S05), then to a private Drive to our Property within the SNF. I personally have been traveling into Monache since 1969 and to our Beck Inholding since 1993. During the SNF Logging Operations in 1970’s the Monache Jeep Road was relocated to its’ present route. Upon logging completion and road relocation the SNF incorrectly designated the Monache Jeep Road as 34E38 (a trail) when they should have correctly identified this route as 20S22 or 22S22A (a level 2 road). Well over 80percent of all users of the Monache Jeep Road are Street Licensed 4 Wheel Drive vehicles transiting into the Inyo National Forest. Even though the SNF has designated this route as a Trail, and received OHV Funds in the past, very little road/trail maintenance has been performed. The use by “green sticker” vehicles and aggressive 4WD operators has significantly deteriorated this vehicle route. What little maintenance that has been done on the Monache Jeep Road by the KRRD is to spend a great deal of time and effort on removing “user created reroutes” some of which have been made by the Forest Service themselves. A good example of how the Monache Jeep Road has deteriorated, during the 2019 Broder Fire, the SNF Hot Shot Crews could no longer drive their Type 3 Fire Trucks to their Spike Camps. The Hot Shot Crews had to park/abandon their fire trucks at the 34E38 Trailhead and use FS and rental 4WD pickup trucks to ferry personnel, materials and supplies to their Spike Camps during their firefighting activities. The Sequoia National Forest has requested $829,121 for Ground Operations (G19-02-15-G01). Of this request, $263,455, are designated for the Kern River Ranger District (KRRD) [see Line Items 1.8 thru 1.25]. From the attached analysis 48% of all KRRD Trails are on the Kern Plateau it follows that $125,829 are designated for KRRD Trail Maintenance on the Kern Plateau. WE RE RECOMMEND THAT THE OHV GRANT COMMISSION REDUCE THE SEQUOIA NATIONAL FOREST GROUND OPERATIONS GRANT REQUEST (G19-02-15-G01) BY $125,829. Dion Salfen - 5/2/2020


This forest would benefit greatly from additional spending on maintenance of roads, etc. The Stanislaus surrounds multiple communities that depend heavily on the recreation it offers but due to the close proximity of this forest to those communities it also presents risk. It would be of benefit to maintain the roads for both forest goers as well as any necessary fire response such as accessing remote starts or simply being able to anchor on an adequate road or trail to build a containment line and potentially save a neighboring community and the forest itself.Josh Carsner - 3/4/2020



endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


I agree with this grant. The Downieville trail system has been realizing an exponential increase in use. Without the ongoing trail maintenance efforts of SBTS, as well as other groups, this amazing trail system would fall into disrepair very quickly. I have worked side by side with some of the members of this group and have never met a more motivated and dedicated group. The enjoyment level of users will be increased with the approval of this grant.John Pellizzer - 4/15/2020


I agree with this grant. The Downieville trail system has been realizing an exponential increase in use. Without the ongoing trail maintenance efforts of SBTS, as well as other groups, this amazing trail system would fall into disrepair very quickly. I have worked side by side with some of the members of this group and have never met a more motivated and dedicated group. The enjoyment level of users will be increased with the approval of this grant.John Pellizzer - 4/15/2020


Im writing in support of the SBTS and thier professional trailwork.Thier employees are riders of both motorized and non.THey get the big picture-build sustainable trails that are fun with local crews.Dale Lambert - 4/16/2020


The motorized trail network in the greater Downieville area is one of the best in California. The Burlington Ridge system is very good as well. Both of these systems are wonderful examples of what the Green Sticker Program can do. The lack of OHV legal campgrounds has always made it awkward for visitors from afar to enjoy these areas for more than a day trip.. The improvements proposed for the Cal-Ida and Skillman campgrounds will open these trail systems up to more users who desire to stay multiple days. Providing OHV legal camping will make these systems even better. Thank you for looking favorably on this grant request. Regards, Steve Davis Steve Davis - 4/17/2020


The Tahoe National Forest has shown a strong commitment to OHV recreation for several decades. As a result they offer California OHV enthusiasts a wide variety of high quality opportunities. As you know, on going maintenance and staff attention is critical to the upkeep and management of these valuable assets. I urge the Commission to look favorably on the Tahoe National Forest Ground Operations Grant request. Taking care of our existing OHV is vital to the program. Thanks Steve Davis Steve Davis - 4/29/2020


US FOREST PATROL DISTRICTS

Hello, My name is Nicholas Kniveton and I am an avid backcountry snowmobiler. I primarily ride in the greater Lake Tahoe area. My main riding area is in the Wrights Lake and Ice House reservoir area as my family owns a cabin at Wrights Lake. The entire community of Wrights Lake cabin owners has noticed a perplexing and disturbing increase in aggressive law enforcement by the El Dorado USFS Patrol District. Cabin owners are frequently stopped, interrogated, and cited for trivial violations. Recently, after years of accessing our cabins by snowmobile, the Patrol district decided that this was illegal and began to cite cabin owners. The Patrol district explained that riding off trail, next to the road (which was covered in 10 feet of snow) is legal, but riding on top of the road is illegal. The cabin owners were confused, as the cited reasons for the need of OHV enforcement (As the grant request states “The majority of the OHV use area has sensitive ecological areas which include meadows, streams and stream crossings along designated routes, sensitive plant occurrences and sensitive wildlife habitat identified through the travel management analysis, and sensitive cultural resources close to designated roads and trails.”) do not seem to align with prohibiting vehicles from traveling over a road and instead forcing them to travel off road. ? The cabin owners then spoke to the El Dorado Forest Supervisor, who was shocked this was occurring and informed us that this was due to new enforcement of a motor vehicle map that was created decades ago, and the intention was never to prohibit cabin owners from using their cabins in the winter. He quickly wrote cabin owners a letter exempting cabin owners. However, this did not stop the constant interrogation by USFS patrol district LEOs. USFS LEOs would sit at trailheads for hours, waiting to interrogate the next snowmobiler to come or leave. Some cabin owners were cited as they forgot to bring their letter with them on their person, and instead left it in their car. I was personally interrogated for nearly an hour before being let off, and requested that I inform the USFS anytime I plan to access my cabin, along with the duration of my trip, and who was with me. Another owner was cited as the family member he brought with him for safety (As the USFS says, always snowmobile with a buddy) was not technically a cabin owner. OHV users felt like they were living in a communist, totalitarian society where they had to carry documents during travel to access their own property. Perplexed by this extreme enforcement, I contacted the Captain of the El Dorado Patrol District. I asked him why the district was focusing so heavily on the Wrights Lake area, which had not received any complaints about violations, and seemed to be ignoring other areas where frequent use and complaints were occurring. I also asked why the district was changing the status quo and enforcing laws from decades ago that the Forest Supervisor stated were not infected to prohibit snowmobiling. The Captain, Frank Aguilar, informed me that the Patrol District has 5 full time LEOs year round. He said that in the winter, there is little work for his officers to do, and “he doesn’t want them to just sit in their offices because there are no complaints”. Therefore, he would instruct them to go out in the field and wait to interrogate OHV users trailheads for hours despite there being no evidence of rule breaking or any other complaint. It is very clear to me that staffing at the El Dorado Patrol district is much higher than it needs to be. From the experience of the Wrights Lake OHV community, as well as my discussion with the Captain, its clear that there are many staff members who would be literally sitting in their chairs all day with nothing to do, but are instead forced to go camp at trailheads and enforce confusing, decades old laws that were not intended for modern OHV use, in a desperate attempt to fill their otherwise empty schedule. Providing $225,600 in funding for staff that have nothing to do is a very poor use of OHV grant money. I believe any further funding of El Dorado Patrol District Staff would not benefit the OHV community, and instead should be directed to projects such as Education and Safety initiatives that truly help the OHV community. Nicholas Kniveton - 4/2/2020


I am opposed to granting any additional funds to USFS El Dorado National Forest to be used for law enforcement. In my opinion USFS Law Enforcement is already overstaffed, particularly in the winter. To justify their staffing levels they are patrolling the forest looking for infractions and citing people for petty or non-existent offenses. I believe that most law enforcement issues in the forest that warrant attention can be addressed by the Sheriff's department. I own a cabin at Wright's Lake and have traveled into the lake in the winter via snowmobile for over 30 years. In recent years I have noticed an increase in FPOs and LEOs stopping, aggressively questioning, harassing, and in some cases issuing citations for fabricated infractions to law abiding citizens traveling into their cabins via snowmobile. This problem became worse over the winter and spring of 2018/2019 when I witnessed first hand and heard a number of reports from others of LEOs waiting at the Ice House and Wright's Road entrances and traveling into the lake themselves via snowmobile. They told cabin owners including myself who were carrying a letter from the Forest Supervisor giving permission for them to travel to their cabins that they would be cited if they had anyone accompanying them on a snowmobile who was not a cabin owner. This was in my opinion a fabricated violation by LEO since the letter did not explicitly allow non-owners to travel with owners. If owners had followed the LEOs' directive they could be forced to travel alone into the back country in the winter, a dangerous practice. In April 2019 I was snowmobiling into Wright's Lake with two non-owners and a LEO gave me a citation for for the above described offense. I reached to to the Forest Supervisor who promptly revised his letter to include non cabin owning traveling companions which removed the basis for this fabricated offense. I am aware of one other cabin owner who was traveling with non-owner companions and received a citation for the same violation. I had to take a half day of my personal time to travel to the Federal Courthouse in Sacramento and appear to address this citation which was immediately dismissed. I listened to others who were appearing for their citations and was struck by the relatively minor and petty nature of most of the citations. It strikes me as a tremendous waste of taxpayer money, that to justify their staffing levels LEOs continue to issue citations for petty or non-existent offenses and these people are run through the court system to pay judges, prosecutors, court staff, etc. In the 50+ years that I have spent time in the El Dorado National Forest, I have never seen an issue that could not have been handled by the Sherriff's department. I think that LEO staffing in the forest should be minimized and not expanded. Thank you. Doug Kniveton - 4/3/2020


Law enforcement is an important element in respecting OHV access and thereby protecting OHV access. The INF enforcement unit has been very supportive of the OHV community. Please approve this grant. Mike Johnston - 5/1/2020


As private property owners in the Monache Meadow area we are supportive of the Grant Request submitted by the INF Patrol District with the following comments / conditions as they relate to the Monache Meadow Patrol Area. 1. That the Grant stipulate that an LEO/FPO be present in the Monache Meadow Complex “full time” (i.e. 8 hours/day) Thursday thru Sunday from mid-May through September. This is the time frame when Law Enforcement is most need due to the OHV bleed-over from the Sequoia National Forest. 2. That the Grant stipulate that closer cooperation and coordination with the Sequoia National Forest LEO’s/FPO’s operating out of the Black Rock Ranger Station be implemented (G19-02-34-L01). Dion Salfen - 5/2/2020


This proposal should be funded. Law enforcement is necessary in the "back country" because, unfortunately, there are a few people who it abuse when they use it! Those few people reflect very badly on the vast majority of those of us who do use our public lands responsibly. Their illegal actions are constantly thrown in the face of those of us that respect out lands by those that wish to eliminate all OHV use. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help greatly. The word will pass quickly that you cannot abuse our lands without the chance of being caught and punished. Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


This proposal should be funded. Law enforcement is necessary in the "back country" because, unfortunately, there are a few people who it abuse when they use it! Those few people reflect very badly on the vast majority of those of us who do use our public lands responsibly. Their illegal actions are constantly thrown in the face of those of us that respect out lands by those that wish to eliminate all OHV use. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help greatly. The word will pass quickly that you cannot abuse our lands without the chance of being caught and punished. Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I support funding of this grant. The third paragraph of the Proposed Project, suggests that a lack of Law Enforcement has resulted in an "almost lawless" condition in some areas. That lawless condition exists today in the Buttermilk/Tungsten Loop area outside of Bishop. Concerned citizens and have mapped and photographed over a dozen new motorcycle and hill climbs in the area. Because of the AB628 combined use program, many of these trespassing motorcycles begin their rides in the town of Bishop. This prevents Law Enforcement from contacting riders at trailheads. Hikers have spoken to motorcycle riders who say they're "just exploring" as they ride off trail causing damage to vegetation, soils, wildlife, and drainages. They do this with no consequence--it is truly a lawless situation! I hope the Buttermilk/Tungsten area can be included in the Off Route Travel concern (ORTC) list. It needs to be a priority before permanent damage is done.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


This is an imperative. As stated in the grant application, the situation is almost lawless. Most of the damage I see is from dirt bikes and there is lots of it. The forest is severely underfunded for law enforcement. Bill Mitchel Bishop, CABill Mitchel - 5/4/2020


I support the grant application by the Lassen/Modoc National Forest for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. Butte County citizens routinely and fairly heavily access the LNF at Butte Meadows and the High Lakes for recreational enjoyment. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on forest service roads in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. I believe the area described could actually use a lot more law enforcement coverage, and encourage the LNF to consider that for future grant applications to ensure LEO coverage in the High Lakes area on weekends and holidays, including nighttime activity in unauthorized areas that would require overnight coverage. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


I support the grant application by the Plumas National Forest for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on our county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. The PNF campgrounds and OHV roads associated with them are often accessed via the highway system, so the need for a truck and trailer to haul OHVs used by LEOs is essential. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


As a private property inholder within the Sequoia National Forest on the Kern Plateau I am basically supportive of the Grant Request made by the SNF Patrol District. However, it is requested that the Final Grant stipulate that the OHV LEO/FPO activities based out of the Black Rock Ranger Station require closer cooperation and coordination with the Inyo National Forest LEO’s/FPO’s operating in the Monache Meadow area of the INF (G19-02-39-L01).Dion Salfen - 5/2/2020


CITIES

2/27/20 Prairie Falcon nesting habitat. In regards to the Habitat Management Plan, and applicable parts of your State Parks OHV grant proposals. Please include these comments in your grant pre submission public comments. I hope you are continuing to include in your HMP and OHV grant proposals the needs and attempts by prairie falcons to nest on Cadillac Butte. They attempt to breed yearly and are again breeding there as of 2/1/20. The areas on and around the Cadillac butte eyrie continue to have competitive motorized events, and ohv users continue to use unauthorized trails up onto the butte near the nesting sites. Recreational shooters continue to use this area which is close to California City, near a highly used private property and a designated camp site by California City. The shooting activity disturbs the nesting falcons. And is not permitted within California City limits. I have shown you evidence of ohv users ignoring this law, because there is no signage in the area. Signage and trail remediation (annually) is necessary to change ohv users habits and inform shooters in the area. In addition, there is a need for coordination between BLM, California City and Kern County in regards to desert use in the Castle Butte area. California City encourages and promotes OHV use in the Castle Butte area, and BLM through coordinated trails and maps promotes use in California City and Kern County areas. This also affects prairie nests sites in the nearby areas. California City and BLM should coordinate their wildlife habit needs in regards to OHV use. Your grant sections within grounds, and law enforcement will hopefully include continued funding for this particular area of need. Please include these comments in your pre submission comments for March 2nd deadlines. Sincerely, Steve Shaw Steve Shaw - 3/4/2020


I would like to comment on the California City grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. Your ground operations grant looks like it does a lot to maintain OHV use. The cost of some of the heavy equipment seems high. Unfortunately I wanted to verify rates and the website doesn't show a Champion Grader and they don't answer the phone on weekends. I thought $775 per day for a grader seemed high and 268 days seems like too many days. The law enforcement application has very reasonable rates for LE. I'm happy about that. The safety application is pretty reasonable considering how many people recreate at California City. I hope all the grants can be funded (but verify the rates and amount of usage on the rented heavy equipment.)Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I would like to comment on the California City grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. Your hourly rates for law enforcement seem pretty high, given the cost of living in Hesperia. Look at the rates of similar positions in California City. They are about half.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I would like to comment on the San Diego Police grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I am a long time San Diego Resident off-roader and surfer. I read that this grant wants to patrol city beaches with ATV's and side by sides purchased with OHV money. I consider myself a watchdog of off-roaders money and want to see it spent wisely. I have spent a good part of my life chasing waves in San Diego, surfing 3 to 5 times a week for decades and I have never seen an illegal vehicle on a San Diego Beach. That doesn't mean it never happens, but it would be a rare occurence. Blacks Beach is specifically mentioned as needing patrols. This beach is extremely difficult to access. The cliffs are so steep a fit person has trouble walking up and down. Vehicle access is only possible from the beach north and south where it would be easy for law enforcement to block without any off-road vehicles. The application talks about partnerships, but doesn't say anything about partnering with San Diego lifeguards. SD lifeguards are sworn peace officers. I am curious what they would say to this proposal and wonder why they are not being talked to? Also talked about is Balboa Park. It is hard to imagine illegal off-road vehicle activity taking place there also, as it's in the middle of the city with no escape routes. The grant mentions the ORBET team using quad motorcycles. Motorcycles have two wheels, quads have four, which are you referring to? At one point in the application you use the word "recoversees" I have no idea what that word is and it is not in the dictionary. Black Mountain is mentioned as an attractive place to off-road. Many years ago it was used for that, but today the mountain is surrounded by roads, houses and businesses. It is hard to get into as all entrances have gates. I think only quiet motorcycles would have any chance in there, but to my knowledge there is no OHV activity at all currently on Black Mountain. In LE Certification #8 you are asked about agreements regarding enforcement on federal land and you answer saying you have an informal agreement with State Park and Rec. I think the applicants should improve their application and talk about patrols that actually make sense. Patrolling places where there is not any OHV activity at all is a waste of resources.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


COUNTIES

**SUPPORT** Amador County Sheriff's office puts Grant Money from OHMVRD to good use each year. As a resident of this county I appreciate the work they do in collaboration with USFS, especially in the safety area, management of legal operations, and Education over Citation when appropriate. The County of Amador is rural, and OHV recreation in the county is a destination that many folks like to recreate in using the USFS as partners, especially on 3 day holiday weekends. Off Highway Vehicle recreation creates a positive socio-economic impact to the positive for our business community throughout the county. Please support this Grant as it has a positive impact, and has done so for many years. My family supports this, David Pickett Resident of Amador County & Past Legislative Action Officer/AMA District 36 MCSC, Inc. DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


Yes, it is all that should be said Much needed since #CAMPFIRE be well be real be American.Darryl G Evans - 3/3/2020


I support the grant application by the Butte County Sheriff's office for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on our county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


This proposal should be funded. Law enforcement is necessary in the "back country" because, unfortunately, there are a few people who it abuse when they use it! Those few people reflect very badly on the vast majority of those of us who do use our public lands responsibly. Their illegal actions are constantly thrown in the face of those of us that respect out lands by those that wish to eliminate all OHV use. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help greatly. The word will pass quickly that you cannot abuse our lands without the chance of being caught and punished. Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. I support funding for the Inyo County Sheriff's Office, and am glad to read in the third paragraph of the Proposed Project that they recognize the damage and route proliferation that is being done in Inyo County by some OHV users. Specifically, I hope the language of this application can be amended to include some specific needs. The Buttermilk/Tungsten loops have become the starting point for over a dozen motorcycle single tracks and hill climbs. The motorcycle trespasses are damaging vegetation, cultural sites, soils and disturbing wildlife and other members of the recreating public. Because of AB628 (referenced in paragraph 2 of the Proposed Project), many of these motorcyclists ride from town, making the usual law enforcement contact point of Trail Heads ineffective in Inyo County. The Sheriff's OHV detail has an incredibly difficult job to do--but I truly hope this funding helps them make a difference. If they can't, Inyo County will no longer be an attractive place for residents or tourists, as the scars from motorcycle trespass will eat up more desert.Margaret J Marshall - 5/4/2020


This request by the Inyo County Sheriffs Office (ICSO) of funding for patrolling, public education, and law enforcement in OHV areas should be approved. A consistent law enforcement presence in the many remote areas of Inyo County is essential to maintain responsible OHV recreation. AB-682 is providing a great opportunity enhance OHV recreational opportunities in Inyo County by linking existing off-highway trails and trail-heads with local services and facilities. The improved OHV recreational opportunities of represented by AB 682 (Adventure Trail Program) are being slowly accepted but the extended trial period must continue to show that it enhances responsible use and does not significantly degrade other recreational uses. Strengthening the ICSO presence in the remote areas of Inyo County will improve the chances that AB682 will continue to be successful and everyone will benefit: both OHV and non-OHV usersJohn Shepherd - 5/4/2020


Good morning: My name is Victor Adolfo Reyes-vazquez, i'm working with the US Army but i'm ETSing on 08/06/2020, and my next duty station as National Guard is Merced California. I'm looking for another job near from that, and I hear about you. Hopefully you can help me, in advance thank you.Victor A Reyes-vazquez - 4/18/2020


This proposal should be funded. Law enforcement is necessary in the "back country" because, unfortunately, there are a few people who it abuse when they use it! Those few people reflect very badly on the vast majority of those of us who do use our public lands responsibly. Their illegal actions are constantly thrown in the face of those of us that respect out lands by those that wish to eliminate all OHV use. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help greatly. The word will pass quickly that you cannot abuse our lands without the chance of being caught and punished. Pat Woods - 5/4/2020


BLM does not have adequate law enforcement staffing to provide a meaningful presence in the Knoxville Area and therefore, must rely on the Napa County Sheriff’s Department for law enforcement. With an increasing number of deer hunters using OHV’s, breakdowns and accidents are also increasing. It is easy to become disoriented and lost in such a rugged and remote area and may require search and rescue operations by the NapaCounty OHV team. Every property owner is wary of the possibility of an encounter with armed trespassers that ends up leading to a very bad situation. The combination of set and random OHV team patrols in the Knoxville Area is a significant comfort to property owners. Without the Napa County Sheriff’s Department OHV Team’s presence in the Knoxville Area and Devil’s Head County Road in particular, lawlessness would return to a dangerous and unacceptable level. This includes trespass and damage to private property, illegal hunting and poaching, garbage dumping, the unlawful and unsafe discharge of firearms and marijuana cultivation. I say this from the standpoint of being a long term property owner on Devil’s Head Road. The OHV team has also played a large role in reducing OHV accidents and the unlawful and unlicensed operation of same. It is my opinion that OHV users, property owners and the great majority of individuals seeking recreation activities in the Knoxville Recreation Area look upon Napa County’s law enforcement patrolling by the OHV team as being a very important and necessary activity. For the above reasons, I strongly support the Napa County Sheriff’s Department’s 2019-2020 application for grant funds from the California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Division. Funding for the 32 (2-man) shifts is a key component of the grant application. Joseph Erasmy Devil’s Head Road Napa CountyJoseph Erasmy - 4/27/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


In looking at your grant proposal, I didn't see where you would mount a spare tire on the OHV? I believe you guys have the Polaris General and there is no factory mount. You might need a spare in the backcountry... Also, where will you store equipment if you need to do emergency fixes while out patrolling? I own and OHV and utilize a roof rack and a storage box in the back bed of my OHV but didn't see any storage related items in your proposal. Lastly, have you considered using powder tracks on your OHV? They work really well and are better than the standard tracks you have. It's a relatively cheap and easy swap out. Hope this feedback helps! Brian - 4/9/2020


I love recreating off road in Placer County, and support responsible OHV use. Please fully fund this grant. Thank you. Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I love recreating off road in Placer County, and support responsible OHV use. Please fully fund this grant. Thank you. Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I love recreating off road in Placer County, and support responsible OHV use. Please fully fund this grant. Thank you. Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I love recreating off road in Placer County, and support responsible OHV use. Please fully fund this grant. Thank you. Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) have helped to make Downieville a lively town again. They have brought people to this beautiful place and do the work to keep it clean. They are also very community oriented. Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) have a well oiled group of people who are focused on making this world a little bit better. Please help them by granting this grant. Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) has a very clear and hopeful plan for the towns around Plumas county. By granting this grant you are sure to help forward movement Steven Lemos - 3/31/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater of the existing Mt Hough trail system I fully support additional development in this area as 1) SBTS builds sustainable trails using existing features and old logging roads that, 2) the recent trail development has brought substantial recreation money into the area and addition trails would just bring more, and 3) the existing trail system is becoming so popular that we need additional trails to continue to sustain the level of interest and the desired secluded yet close to town popularity of the Mt Hough area. It is my understanding that the phase 2 would also include a decent into Taylorsville which would expand the sphere of recreation money spent in the community. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


Growing up in the area I have used the Claremont ‘trail system’ numerous time for hiking, hunting, and biking. It desperately needs to be modified to sustainable trail as it is an existing non conforming trail system that should be adopted into the official trail system. The proposed project would use existing user created trail and connect multiple recreation site together allowing for great multi use trail system. Plumas county, maybe more now than ever, need to advocate for additional recreation revenue in our communities. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater of these trails, I can attest that the proposed trails desperately need maintenance increased sustainability of the trail tread. I grew up hiking on these trails and they have become more and more overgrown, without maintenance they will disipear and cut off recreation access to some of the most spectacular views in the Feather River Water Shed. Trails throughout the region no only bring me personal joy, but also bring substation recreation dollars into Plumas county which depends on yearly recreation revenue. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


The work that the Stewardship does to build and maintain trails in the Plumas County area directly effects the vivacity and economy of Plumas County. The work they do on our trail systems are great examples of a valuable recreational asset on our forest. It offers an incredible opportunity for participants to explore the outdoors and build deeper connections to the environment. SBTS will employ local Plumas County residents, Feather River College students, and high school students to complete the trail maintenance on this valuable resource. They have a long history and legacy of safely leading volunteers on their projects. This not only gets the community involved, but it also builds stewards and investment in public lands. The efforts of the Stewardship and its volunteers have a direct, positive effect on our community. Please continue to support them in their vision of preserving responsible access to our area. Thank you for your consideration, Saylor -- Saylor Flett | Instructor | Guide | Photographer Outdoor Recreation Leadership Feather River College 570 Golden Eagle Ave. Quincy, Ca 95971 sflett@frc.edu | www.frc.edu/ORL | www.saylorflett.com p: 530.283.0202 Ext.216 | f: 530.283.3757 Visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frc.orl Saylor Flett - 4/2/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


Mt Hough is known around the world for its mountain bikingand more trails are very welcomed. They bring tourists from all over to the area and put money into the local economies, create jobs, and more trails will show the county is progressing and embracing the outdoor community. More trails will also create more properly managed land for water shed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. However, these trails are very popular and by expanded they will be utilized and will show that Quincy is on the forefront off world-class trails systems. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I live in Reno and come to Plumas county very often in order to enjoy these trails. I believe it is essential for the outdoor community to have these trails maintained so tourism can stimulate the local economy and the land can be cared for to protect the watershed etc. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I have not utilized the Claremont area trail system, but I would love to explore it if the proposed 40 mile addition were to come to pass. This planning and analysis would pave the way for trails to be built, which would bring tourist dollars to the area and would keep jobs in the county. Please fund it! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Trail work and Ground operations are important to the community by bringing people into the county to recreate and supplying local jobs. It is important to build long lasting trails the proper,sustainable way. Jared - 4/3/2020


More trails on Mt Hough sound awesome. Connecting existing single track that otherwise isn't ridden by mountain bikes will greatly improve the riding on hough. It will also do the community good by supplying more local jobs and bringing more tourism into the community and economy. Jared - 4/3/2020


If there were system trails on Claremont above Quincy it would improve the riding in quincy greatly. It would also help the local economy by supplying jobs and more attraction and reasons to come to town Jared - 4/3/2020


The development of trails in this area have been a game changer for Quincy and Plumas County. Not only has it increased the health and well-being of our community members, it has increased the economic viability of our community. What was once a burnt-out and heavily disturbed logging area is now also a multi-use recreation zone that brings a richness for our little town. More of that! Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


The development of trails in this area have been a game changer for Quincy and Plumas County. Not only has it increased the health and well-being of our community members, it has increased the economic viability of our community. What was once a burnt-out and heavily disturbed logging area is now also a multi-use recreation zone that brings a richness for our little town. More of that! Since COVID 19, I have seen our community come out in force (6 feet apart) to use local trails. It's not only good for our economy, but good for sanity. Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


The potential development of this area for trails is a great use of a heavily logged/fire prone mountain right next to town. Trail development on this area would not only get people out in the forest behind their fence, but create awareness of what's out there. Trail development could also mitigate some fire hazards and make our community a little bit safer. Inge R Stock - 4/4/2020


Mt Hough is one of my favorite places to ride, primarily because the trails are always maintained and are in excellent shape. This is because of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship trail crew. They care about the area, and really give their all to make sure the trails are able to be enjoyed by everyone. Please fund them! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Mt Hough is one of my favorite places to ride. I am excited by the potential for more than 30 miles of new trails in the area. So much to explore! This trail development will help keep jobs in Plumas County. Please fund this! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies.Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


The projects being proposed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) will allow for more sustainable recreation and employment for the greater Lost Sierra region. As someone forced to live in the Bay Area by my job occupation I rely heavily on the folks who reside in these mountain towns when I need to escape for my outdoor fix, and the funding SBTS is applying for will provide resources to help develop and foster an even stronger outdoor recreation community that will be devoted to working with other local businesses/organizations to ensure mutually beneficial practices for the entire community and environment. I have volunteered with SBTS and I can personally vouch for the organization's quality and commitment to the Lost Sierra and all who call it home. Thank you, Sean Devine Berkeley, CA Sean Devine - 4/13/2020


The projects being proposed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) will allow for more sustainable recreation and employment for the greater Lost Sierra region. As someone forced to live in the Bay Area by my job occupation I rely heavily on the folks who reside in these mountain towns when I need to escape for my outdoor fix, and the funding SBTS is applying for will provide resources to help develop and foster an even stronger outdoor recreation community that will be devoted to working with other local businesses/organizations to ensure mutually beneficial practices for the entire community and environment. I have volunteered with SBTS and I can personally vouch for the organization's quality and commitment to the Lost Sierra and all who call it home. Thank you, Sean Devine Berkeley, CA Sean Devine - 4/13/2020


The projects being proposed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) will allow for more sustainable recreation and employment for the greater Lost Sierra region. As someone forced to live in the Bay Area by my job occupation I rely heavily on the folks who reside in these mountain towns when I need to escape for my outdoor fix, and the funding SBTS is applying for will provide resources to help develop and foster an even stronger outdoor recreation community that will be devoted to working with other local businesses/organizations to ensure mutually beneficial practices for the entire community and environment. I have volunteered with SBTS and I can personally vouch for the organization's quality and commitment to the Lost Sierra and all who call it home. Thank you, Sean Devine Berkeley, CA Sean Devine - 4/13/2020


The projects being proposed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) will allow for more sustainable recreation and employment for the greater Lost Sierra region. As someone forced to live in the Bay Area by my job occupation I rely heavily on the folks who reside in these mountain towns when I need to escape for my outdoor fix, and the funding SBTS is applying for will provide resources to help develop and foster an even stronger outdoor recreation community that will be devoted to working with other local businesses/organizations to ensure mutually beneficial practices for the entire community and environment. I have volunteered with SBTS and I can personally vouch for the organization's quality and commitment to the Lost Sierra and all who call it home. Thank you, Sean Devine Berkeley, CA Sean Devine - 4/13/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trail systems are some of my favorite on earth. I've been visiting the area since 2000 and have helped work on trails in Downieville, Lakes Basin, Quincy, Portola and even in Grass Valley. The trails in this area are so important both to the local communities and to recreational tourism. I met my husband on those trails by volunteering with SBTS. And I've made many life long friends on those trails. The continued support of these trails encourages sustainable growth, education, economic support, and general stewardship through the generations. Nica Lorber - 4/13/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trail systems are some of my favorite on earth. I've been visiting the area since 2000 and have helped work on trails in Downieville, Lakes Basin, Quincy, Portola and even in Grass Valley. The trails in this area are so important both to the local communities and to recreational tourism. I met my husband on those trails by volunteering with SBTS. And I've made many life long friends on those trails. The continued support of these trails encourages sustainable growth, education, economic support, and general stewardship through the generations. Nica Lorber - 4/13/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trail systems are some of my favorite on earth. I've been visiting the area since 2000 and have helped work on trails in Downieville, Lakes Basin, Quincy, Portola and even in Grass Valley. The trails in this area are so important both to the local communities and to recreational tourism. I met my husband on those trails by volunteering with SBTS. And I've made many life long friends on those trails. The continued support of these trails encourages sustainable growth, education, economic support, and general stewardship through the generations. Nica Lorber - 4/13/2020


I support SBTS efforts to obtain grant money. They provide substainable trails, jobs and money that helps support the local economy. Rod GlazebrookROD GLAZEBROOK - 4/14/2020


I support SBTS efforts to obtain grant money. They provide substainable trails, jobs and money that helps support the local economy. Rod GlazebrookROD GLAZEBROOK - 4/14/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewards grant to help develop new single track on Mt. Hough. There is a great need for more multi-use single track and new single track will only add to the appeal of the area to mountain bike and motorcycle riders. Secondary this will provide economic benefit to the area as a whole.Frank Havlik - 4/15/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewards grant to maintain the Mt. Hough trail system. These trails are well used and provide an economic benefit to the surrounding area. Maintenance of these trails will help encourage visitation to the area.Frank Havlik - 4/15/2020


I am in agreement with this grant. The connection of OHV areas in the Lost Sierra via multi use, single track trail will greatly enhance the riding experience. It will also bring much needed revenue to the towns of Quincy and Downieville though the recreational users of this connector trail. It will be a very enjoyable experience to ride from one community to another via single track trail. John Pellizzer - 4/15/2020


I support this grant to explore the development of 40 miles of new trail. There is an urgent need for more multi-use and OHV legal single track to meet the growing demand. Frank Havlik - 4/15/2020


I support SBTS receiving a planning grant for the Claremont area near Quincy, as it will provide a completely different trails experience than Mount Hough due to its generally north facing orientation, making for cooler, more shaded mid-summer outings than the south-facing Mount Hough. It will also help disperse the growing trails usage in the area as Quincy is quickly becoming a popular recreational trails destination for both motorized and non-motorized users. Additionally, having new trails that would connect existing trails as well as existing campgrounds will make the Claremont area important for larger regional trails connectivity, like connecting Quincy to the middle fork of the Feather River and Nelson Point, which eventually will connect with Downieville. Thank you for your continued support of SBTS and all the very important work they do to bring recreation and new jobs to the region.Kurt Gensheimer - 4/16/2020


As a frequent user of the Mount Hough trail system, I am in full support of a planning grant for SBTS to lay out an additional 30 miles of trail on Mount Hough. Mount Hough has become a national attraction for recreational users of all types, and it is bringing much-needed tourism revenue to the town of Quincy. These trails are also providing critical jobs and a source of community pride. Adding 30 more miles of professionally built trail will expand recreational opportunities and connectivity, helping spread out usage across this vast mountain to help prevent overuse of a single trail. Mount Hough trail has become very popular in the last couple years, and without other singletrack options from the peak that funnel back toward Oakland Camp, the trail could become overcrowded, requiring more maintenance than needed if other options existed. Thank you for your continued support of SBTS, they are an incredibly valued resource in Plumas County!Kurt Gensheimer - 4/16/2020


I am in complete support of SBTS receiving grant funds for ground operations trails maintenance in Plumas County. Thanks to SBTS, the trails in Plumas National Forest have never been in better condition overall both for users and for habitat, and these grants are providing important employment opportunities for local residents. It is particularly exciting to see Nelson Creek Trail included in these ground operations plans, as this is a historic alignment that is a very important regional connector trail between Downieville and Quincy. Trails are a source of community pride in a region that is severely depressed economically. Trails are a recreational and historic treasure for Plumas County, and are a vital source of recreational income. Thank you for your continued support of SBTS and all the hard work they do to keep this public resource available to the public.Kurt Gensheimer - 4/16/2020


I would love to see 30+ miles of new trail on the Mt Hough Trail System!!Jonathan Rayner - 4/16/2020


Adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trails would be a great economic & social win for the area!Jonathan Rayner - 4/16/2020


As an outdoor enthusiast I truly enjoy this special area. It is an area with so much potential for growth. Growth that would be helpful to draw more people to the area and also disperse the people onto a variety of trail options.Bobbi Wilcox - 4/16/2020


As this are grows, it is important to maintain the trails and facilities that support them. This is a very important aspect of growth in this area. Having more people recreating here is good for the local economy, but it is very important that someone take care of these trails.Bobbi Wilcox - 4/16/2020


Planning is a very important part of development. I enjoy the existing trails and would love to see more built, but it needs to be done in a way that is conscious of the surrounding area.Bobbi Wilcox - 4/16/2020


This project is a great example of healthy cooperation between Plumas County, Plumas National Forest, and the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. These groups and agencies have a proven track record of working together to implement successful projects. This development project is a key step to creating a world class OHV legal system. Recreation based economic growth is of huge importance to this economically depressed area. The project will benefit the community in many ways by providing recreation, attracting visitors, and by giving an economic boost to hotels, restaurants and locals who are employed by the project. This development project enjoys widespread community support and has my full support. Thank You, Ron HeardRon Heard - 4/16/2020


This project represents a great example of healthy cooperation between Plumas County, Plumas National Forest and the Sierra Buttes Stewardship. Such cooperation is the key to success of this project. As a long time trail volunteer I've seen first hand how the development of this OHV area has been successful. The project area enjoys widespread community support thanks to the recreation opportunities created for locals and visitors alike. In addition, these trails are a huge economic boost to this depressed area. This project has my full support. Thank You, Ron HeardRon Heard - 4/16/2020


Plumas County, Plumas National Forest, and the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship have a proven track record of working to implement projects similar to the Claremont Planning Project. This project is key to helping provide connectivity between other OHV areas including Downieville, California OHV area and the Mt. Hough OHV area located in Quincy. California. The sum is greater than the parts as such connectivity will attract a huge amount of attention from OHV enthusiasts throughout California, Nevada and beyond. This Planning project enjoys widespread community support from individuals, businesses, and local government. I strongly support this project. Thank You, Ron HeardRon Heard - 4/16/2020


Expanding the trail system is a win for all involved, both trail users and the community.Prashant Singh - 4/17/2020


Expanding the trail system is a win for all involved, both trail users and the community.Prashant Singh - 4/17/2020


Expanding the trail system is a win for all involved, both trail users and the community.Prashant Singh - 4/17/2020


I love visiting Plumas County, particularly to use their growing network of bicycle trails. Please help maintain public access and create opportunities for people to get outdoors - thanks!Jason Roesslein - 4/17/2020


I love visiting Plumas County, particularly to enjoy the growing bicycle trail network. Please continue to help maintain public access and create opportunities for people to get outside. Thanks!Jason Roesslein - 4/17/2020


Looks like a fantastic plan that all generations of my family would utilize.Chris Hawkins - 4/17/2020


Yes pleaseChris Hawkins - 4/17/2020


Claremont will be used by my family for generations to come.Chris Hawkins - 4/17/2020


The publicly accessible trails are extremely important in creating recreational opportunities, supporting the local economy, and encouraging sustainability. Kevin Kim - 4/17/2020


I support the work being done with the partnership with SBTS. I visit almost every weekend from Paradise. It provides excellent outdoor recreation and I love eating at the local restaurants while in town. The work done helps provide jobs and also brings in money to the local economy. Torey Feldhaus - 4/17/2020


I support the work being done with the partnership with SBTS. I visit almost every weekend from Paradise. It provides excellent outdoor recreation and I love eating at the local restaurants while in town. The work done helps provide jobs and also brings in money to the local economy. Torey Feldhaus - 4/17/2020


I support the work being done with the partnership with SBTS. I visit almost every weekend from Paradise. It provides excellent outdoor recreation and I love eating at the local restaurants while in town. The work done helps provide jobs and also brings in money to the local economy. Torey Feldhaus - 4/17/2020


The publicly accessible trails are extremely important in providing recreational opportunities, supporting the local economy, and encouraging sustainability. Kevin Kim - 4/17/2020


The publicly accessible trails are extremely important in creating recreational opportunities, supporting the local economy, and encouraging sustainability. Kevin Kim - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstanding trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs... Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstanding trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs...Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstanding trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs... Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstanding trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs... Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstanding trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs... Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


I support trail maintenance on 70+ miles of trail including Mt Hough Trail System, Claremont, Nelson Creek, Mt Fillmore.Randy Meyer - 4/17/2020


I support the construction of 30+ miles of new trail on the Mt Hough Trail System.Randy Meyer - 4/17/2020


This is for environmental planning and analysis on adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trailsRandy Meyer - 4/17/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in building and maintaining trails in the Downieville; Quincy; and surrounding areas.Richard Metro - 4/17/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in building and maintaining trails in the Downieville; Quincy; and surrounding areas.Richard Metro - 4/17/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in building and maintaining trails in the Downieville; Quincy; and surrounding areas.Richard Metro - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes does an excellent job in bringing the outdoors to the pubic through their work in the California mountains. Please support them in supporting all of us in getting outside by supporting them with their proposed grants. This work brings revenue to remote areas of the Sierra tha supports local folk as well. Thank you! LukeLuke Shenefield - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes does an excellent job in bringing the outdoors to the pubic through their work in the California mountains. Please support them in supporting all of us in getting outside by supporting them with their proposed grants. This work brings revenue to remote areas of the Sierra tha supports local folk as well. Thank you! LukeLuke Shenefield - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes does an excellent job in bringing the outdoors to the pubic through their work in the California mountains. Please support them in supporting all of us in getting outside by supporting them with their proposed grants. This work brings revenue to remote areas of the Sierra tha supports local folk as well. Thank you! LukeLuke Shenefield - 4/17/2020


The Downeville and Quincy area mountain bike trail network are a critical piece of infrastructure and recreation for the area. I frequently travel up to that area in the warmer months for long weekends. We'll spend a good chunk of money on lodging, food etc. In aggregate this type of economic activity is hugely important to the area. Improving the trail system will only increase the size of that positive impact to the community. Plus trails are just awesome, we should have more! Mt Hough currently has an awesome selection of trails. If we continue to build a little more there it could become a world class destination. It would be transformative to the community's quality of life. -DanDan Haeger - 4/17/2020


The Downeville and Quincy area mountain bike trail network are a critical piece of infrastructure and recreation for the area. I frequently travel up to that area in the warmer months for long weekends. We'll spend a good chunk of money on lodging, food etc. In aggregate this type of economic activity is hugely important to the area. Improving the trail system will only increase the size of that positive impact to the community. Plus trails are just awesome, we should have more! Building the Claremont connector would be an excellent addition. Being able to cover a huge new area of terrain would be a huge improvement to the quality of riding in the area. It would generate some create new tourism in the area, and just generally improve the quality of life in the town by having more trails to enjoy. -DanDan Haeger - 4/17/2020


The Downeville and Quincy area mountain bike trail network are a critical piece of infrastructure and recreation for the area. I frequently travel up to that area in the warmer months for long weekends. We'll spend a good chunk of money on lodging, food etc. In aggregate this type of economic activity is hugely important to the area. Improving the trail system will only increase the size of that positive impact to the community. Plus trails are just awesome, we should have more! Building the Claremont connector would be an excellent addition. Being able to cover a huge new area of terrain would be a huge improvement to the quality of riding in the area. It would generate some create new tourism in the area, and just generally improve the quality of life in the town by having more trails to enjoy. -DanDan Haeger - 4/17/2020


Our trails are in need of extra love and maintenance that is not normally received. This grant would be very helpful in that regard!Katie Buitrago - 4/17/2020


Our trails are in need of extra love and maintenance that is not normally received. This grant would be very helpful in that regard!Katie Buitrago - 4/17/2020


Our trails are in need of extra love and maintenance that is not normally received. This grant would be very helpful in that regard!Katie Buitrago - 4/17/2020


Though I live in bishop CA I travel up to Quincy a few times a season to mountain bike and the continued maintenance of these trails is important to me.Sam orsello - 4/17/2020


The Mt Hough Trail System is a great public recreation resource that I travel to use, extending the trail network and creating more trail connectivity would increase the quality of the resource.Sam orsello - 4/17/2020


I’m excited about this plan to create better connectivity between campgrounds and existing trails. This would give great opportunities directly from the campgrounds for recreating, and creat the potential for logistically easy overnight mountain biking. Sam orsello - 4/17/2020


SBTS is growing the economy in Plumas and surrounding counties with their plan to connect the communities of the lost Sierra with world class multi use trails. The planning involves identifying stakeholders, locating potential trail corridors, and navigating all required environmental processes. This is expensive. This grant will help to complete the process.Stu Wik - 4/17/2020


The trails on Mt. Hough provide economic support to the surrounding communities. Riders come to Mt. Hough from all over Northern California, and points beyond to experience the trails and enjoy time in the lost Sierra.Stu Wik - 4/17/2020


This work will bring money to local communities. These trails require annual maintenance to stay open.Stu Wik - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship maintains the the trails, organizes volunteer trail work and improves local economies throughout the lost Sierra by providing, maintaining a world class trail system.Stu Wik - 4/17/2020


Recreation is the lifeblood of all rural communities. Logging and mining are not enough to support these communities. By connecting the communities of the lost Sierra, people will come to ride and visit the towns connected by the proposed trailsStu Wik - 4/17/2020


Mt Hough needs these trails to form loops. These loops will improve the riding experience and reduce the number of illegal user built trailsStu Wik - 4/17/2020


I support this project as it: - Creates Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals - Creates local employment - Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance - Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Paul Daro - 4/17/2020


Now, more than ever, it is important to maintain trails on the Plumas. Hiking and biking is essential to our physical and mental health in these stressful times. And recreating in the forest is compatible with 'social distancing" guidelines. Jeff Rockholm - 4/17/2020


Please fund the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship project. I live a couple hours away from Quincy but make the trip to mountain bike in the area a couple times a year. SBTS creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, and it creates local employment. Funding this program will create sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance and will keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedChris Miller - 4/17/2020


Please fund the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship project. I live a couple hours away from Quincy but make the trip to mountain bike in the area a couple times a year. SBTS creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, and it creates local employment. Funding this program will create sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance and will keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedChris Miller - 4/17/2020


Please fund the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship project. I live a couple hours away from Quincy but make the trip to mountain bike in the area a couple times a year. SBTS creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, and it creates local employment. Funding this program will create sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance and will keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedChris Miller - 4/17/2020


The trail is one of a kind. It would be great to see it prosper.Andrew Kirst - 4/17/2020


I strongly support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship planning efforts. Sustainable back-county trails benefit the public by offering access, and the ecosystem through reduction of erosion and run off and the wider community. SBTS has demonstrated an ability to both gather resources from the wider trail-user community and to support the local Plumas communities.Bruce Prescott - 4/17/2020


Please fund this organization to create local employment for people in the county, help support a sustainable trail system with lower maintenance, yet all the while protecting the watershed for people to enjoy the outdoors, which we need even more during these tough times.Jason Long - 4/17/2020


Please fund this organization to create local employment for people in the county, help support a sustainable trail system with lower maintenance, yet all the while protecting the watershed for people to enjoy the outdoors, which we need even more during these tough times.Jason Long - 4/17/2020


Please fund this organization to create local employment for people in the county, help support a sustainable trail system with lower maintenance, yet all the while protecting the watershed for people to enjoy the outdoors, which we need even more during these tough times.Jason Long - 4/17/2020


As a part time resident, I support trail work in Plumas County because: 1. It creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. 2. It creates local employment and economic development opportunities. 3. It creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. 4. It keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Thank you, TysonTyson Godfrey - 4/17/2020


As a part time resident, I support Mt. Hough trail work because: 1. It creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. 2. It creates local employment and economic development opportunities. 3. It creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. 4. It keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Thank you, TysonTyson Godfrey - 4/17/2020


As a part time resident, I support the Claremont project because: 1. It creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. 2. It creates local employment and economic development opportunities. 3. It creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. 4. It keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Thank you, TysonTyson Godfrey - 4/17/2020


As a part time resident, I support the Claremont project because: 1. It creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. 2. It creates local employment and economic development opportunities. 3. It creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. 4. It keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Thank you, TysonTyson Godfrey - 4/17/2020


I first mountain biked down Mt. Hough last summer and was blown away by the trail development and scenery. It is the PERFECT place to build into a mountain bike destination. Right now there is only one main trail down the mountain, but there is opportunity for so much more. Trail building does require funds and grants, though, to make sure the trails are safe and sustainable. The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship deserves this funding and the local communities will benefit. Becky Timbers - 4/17/2020


I would like to voice my support for the Mt Hough Phase II Development. I live in Truckee and I see the regional benefits of developing a cohesive and environmentally responsible trail network. This brings jobs into the community and is a model for sustainable land use. Please consider this grant.Dylan Cisney - 4/17/2020


Another great project for the SBTS & the Lost Sierra. Please support the SBTS in building more world-class trails. Thanks, Mike ...Mike Chaplin - 4/17/2020


Myself & others who enjoy the Mt. Hough trail system are looking forward to more multi-use trails & interconnecting the Lost Sierra Communities. Please support the SBTS with their great trail work. Thanks, Mike ...Mike Chaplin - 4/17/2020


I ride mountain bikes & dirtbikes at Mt. Hough, Nelson Creek, & other trails in Plumas Co. & Plumas NF several times a year. Please provide OHV grant funds for the SBTS to continue their great trail work. Thanks, Mike ...Mike Chaplin - 4/17/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me personally and it is my view that we need to keep them open for the public to use and enjoy. This grant will help SBTS to work towards creating/facilitating a new tourism-based economy and jobs for those that live in these disadvantaged communities.Geoffrey K Hemmick - 4/17/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me personally and it is my view that we need to keep them open for the public to use and enjoy. This grant will help SBTS to work towards creating/facilitating a new tourism-based economy and jobs for those that live in these disadvantaged communities.Geoffrey K Hemmick - 4/17/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me personally and it is my view that we need to keep them open for the public to use and enjoy. This grant will help SBTS to work towards creating/facilitating a new tourism-based economy and jobs for those that live in these disadvantaged communities.Geoffrey K Hemmick - 4/17/2020


Connect 3 campgrounds, 40mi of trails! What’s not to like! We definitely need some funding! If newer generations don’t learn to get outside then we’ve lost the connection to the great outdoors! We end up with future digital screen consumed, type 2 diabetic children who don’t even know what it’s like to be grounded and digitally detoxified! Plus: •Creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals •Creates local employment •Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance •Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedEarl Seneres - 4/17/2020


Who wouldn’t want 30 miles of #dirtmagic Developing more trails would help: •Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals •Creates local employment •Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance •Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedEarl Seneres - 4/17/2020


Keep these trails open! Events like Grinduro bring so much business to the area. Also: •Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals •Creates local employment •Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance •Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedEarl Seneres - 4/17/2020


Hello and thank you for the chance to comment and support this grant and project. This is really a special opportunity to add trail mileage to a spectacular but lesser known area. This will help to spread out trail use in a popular area and keep trails open and safe for the public. This will greatly improve an area that is very important to me and the local community. It will enhance user experience and opportunity as well as provide some local employment. Thank you for your consideration and I hope to see this project and grant funded. Chris Christopher Ruedy - 4/18/2020


Hello and thank you for the chance to comment here. This grant would cover work on a trail network that is part of regular use and keeping it open for public use is extremely important to me and that community it serves. This program will create local employment, keep trails open for public, and help make up for lack of funding with land managers and other organizations. Thanks and I hope to see this funded, ChrisChristopher Ruedy - 4/18/2020


Hello and thank you for the opportunity to support this trail project. I am a huge fan of out recreation and especially trail-based adventure. These trails are very important to me and also for the towns are communities they serve. With resources being scant for trail work these days, theser grants are even more important in these economically struggling areas. thanks for your attention, ChrisChristopher Ruedy - 4/18/2020


looking forward to seeing this grant approved to improve these busy and important recreational trails. I highly recommend SBTS to move forward with this grant, Karen Siroky - 4/18/2020


I strongly support this grant. Maintaining the trails in Plumas County brings in much needed economic support through visitation of the region. Partnering with experienced organizations in trail building and maintenance helps protect environmentally sensitive areas along side recreational opportunities. Thank you, Karen Lynaugh Karen M Lynaugh - 4/18/2020


I strongly support this grant. Development of additional trails in the Mount Hough area will help build the economic and recreation possibilities in the Quincy area. We are frequent visitors and are excited to see this growth. Partnering with such a group as Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship ensure proper oversight for all involved. Thank you, Karen LynaughKaren M Lynaugh - 4/18/2020


I strongly support this grant to be given to Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship.Karen M Lynaugh - 4/18/2020


The Mount Hough trail system is a incredible destination. The Trail Stewardship has done a wonderful job on the local trails, and I look greatly forward to the second phase of the Mt Hough trail system being completed. The trail completion should only benefit the local economy with increased tourism and job opportunities. Thanks JohnJohn Aberg - 4/18/2020


This trail network provides a huge benefit to the region by bringing in much needed jobs and economic stimulus. Plus they are some of the best trails around!Tim Buckner - 4/18/2020


This trail network provides a huge benefit to the region by bringing in much needed jobs and economic stimulus. Plus they are some of the best trails around!Tim Buckner - 4/18/2020


This trail network provides a huge benefit to the region by bringing in much needed jobs and economic stimulus. Plus they are some of the best trails around!Tim Buckner - 4/18/2020


This trail network provides a huge benefit to the region by bringing in much needed jobs and economic stimulus. Plus they are some of the best trails around!Tim Buckner - 4/18/2020


Please move forward on this project expanding mtn. bike trails has many benefits to the community and gets more people out in mother nature. Thanks, Shawn HallShawn T Hall - 4/18/2020


I am a avid mountain biker and ride in Plumas County many times a year. We bring good size groups to this area and would love to see this area expanded with more mountain bike trails.Shawn T Hall - 4/18/2020


We need more mountain bike trails so we keep off the Pacific Crest Trail. These improvements will help bring more tax dollars to the local community. Thanks, Shawn HallShawn T Hall - 4/18/2020


Need more trails and this project should move forward. Thank you, Shawn Hall Shawn T Hall - 4/18/2020


I support these grant funds to be used by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to improve the Mt Hough trail system. These trails draw in outdoor enthusiasts from all over Northern California who help boost the local economy. Maintenance of these trails contributes to their sustainability and well built trail options allows trail users to spread out and reduce use impacts on overuse of well known outdoor areas. All SBTS's previous trail work is proof of their ability to create high quality trails that offer a unique outdoor experience while protecting the wild areas and watersheds we value. Brian Old - 4/18/2020


I support these grant funds to be used by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to build new trails in the Mt Hough trail system. These trails draw in outdoor enthusiasts from all over Northern California who help boost the local economy. Creation of new well built trail options allows trail users to spread out and reduce use impacts on overuse of well known outdoor areas. All SBTS's previous trail work is proof of their ability to create high quality trails that offer a unique outdoor experience while protecting the wild areas and watersheds we value. Brian Old - 4/18/2020


I support these grant funds to be used by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to perform environmental planning for new trails and campground connections in Claremont Zone. High quality trails draw in outdoor enthusiasts from all over Northern California who help boost the local economy. Creation of new well built trail options allows trail users to spread out and reduce use impacts on overuse of well known outdoor areas. All SBTS's previous trail work is proof of their ability to create high quality trails that offer a unique outdoor experience while protecting the wild areas and watersheds we value. Brian Old - 4/18/2020


I love mountain biking on these trails, let’s bring more economic help to the mountains by expanding the trails enticing more people to recreate.Brittany Yelland - 4/18/2020


I love mountain biking on these trails, let’s bring more economic help to the mountains by expanding the trails enticing more people to recreate.Brittany Yelland - 4/18/2020


I love mountain biking on these trails, let’s bring more economic help to the mountains by expanding the trails enticing more people to recreate.Brittany Yelland - 4/18/2020


Brings jobs, brings money, provides good role models for the community. Need I say more :). Mahalos!Todd Donaldson - 4/18/2020


Brings money to a county in need. This is a no brainer. Jobs! What this has done and "will do" is something that works and is working in other counties. Mahalos!Todd Donaldson - 4/18/2020


This brings economic support to a county in need of it. This is a no brainer. Please support! Mahalo!Todd Donaldson - 4/18/2020


Please support this effort to build trails for recreation. This type of organization helps to get people into the outdoors. Todd McMahon - 4/18/2020


Please support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, and their efforts to maintain safe trails, and encourage responsible use of Mt Hugh. Todd McMahon - 4/18/2020


What a great project, connecting trails! Lets support these guys, and build trails for the next few hundred years! Todd McMahon - 4/18/2020


As a self-described "old dude," I've been pretty much every type of recreational user you can imagine over my lifetime. Rancher, equestrian, hiker, backpacker, fisherman, motorcyclist, bicyclist... not a "birder," though. Can't claim that one. Yet. In reviewing the planning efforts tied to this grant, I would like to respectfully but firmly add my two cents' worth in favor of incorporating "user-created trails" into your official system for maintenance. Users know what they want, and the vast majority of them know how they can safely use trails. In the absence of sensible, safe and fun trails in a lot of places in our region, users have filled that gap. In my decades of using these trails, I can confidently say that the majority of users who take the time and invest the effort to create these trails are very, very good at it. Many of them are employees and management at places like Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, or Mike's Bikes, or Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates, or a hundred such organizations that are wholly invested in this community. They are experienced users, and they are willing to work with you. Please proceed with respect for their expertise and their contributions. Sincerely, Jay Van Rein Jay Van Rein - 4/19/2020


This is a good cause for a community that is very short on resources.Jon Rivas - 4/19/2020


Multi-use trails like the ones that will be maintained and improved by this project are the future of recreation in our region. The trails and related amenities that are being maintained through this project have quickly become cherished recreational resources in these communities. Economics, certainly, are involved and important - visitors and tourists are part of the equation. But more importantly, in my estimation, is the way this network of trails has brought together users raging from hikers and backpackers to runners, cyclists, bird watchers, campers and even users of motor vehicles in some cases. We all see the value of a shared resource like these trails, and we are increasingly sharing the responsibility for maintaining and even self-policing them among each user community. It's such a positive development. Please continue to invest these funds in the groups and volunteers who maintain these trails. Sincerely, Jay Van Rein Jay Van Rein - 4/19/2020


To whom it may concern: This is a letter of support for 30 new miles of trail on Mt Hough. Not only am I a user of the existing trails. I am a second home owner in the County that receives benefit economically thru the vacation rental of my home. The addition of more trail not only ensures the continued attraction of those drawn to the area, but also creates additional interest to new users. These visitors bring much needed tourist dollars to the County, providing JOBS! to local residents and more thrilling physical enjoyment to users of these trails. I support providing Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship with the resources needed to do the excellent work they've done and continue to do! Sincerely Charles BrownCharles Brown - 4/19/2020


The network of sustainable trails, built by professionals is key to the region. Sustainable - built with winter and summer considerations, with multi-user considerations - so that less maintenance is required. Rogue trails are built in every region, and without planned expansion, the public will take to it's own devices. Let's build more trails, where the experts want them, and make this a system that few other areas can rival - expand trails means more users, and more money to the businesses and county. Michael Paves - 4/19/2020


To whom it may concern: I am writing to you today to express my support for Ground Operations in Plumas County for trail maintenance on Mt Hough. These 70 miles of trail are more than just a thrilling attraction to the area. They also bring much needed economic stimulus to the local economy from the tourist dollars spent. Providing employment for local business and tax revenue for the County. The efforts of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and others have had and continue have an important impact both fiscally and environmentally to this beautiful part of California. I support; providing resources to continue this effort! Sincerely Charles Brown Charles Brown - 4/19/2020


Without robust trail management, the trails fall apart and people stop coming to enjoy the area and spend money. Jobs are created with the world class trail system, and the network must be maintained. This grant is essential and important - the 70+ miles of trails is far to vast to expect 100% volunteer maintenance. Please approve this grant and keep visitors coming to the County, supporting businesses and keep people working.Michael Paves - 4/19/2020


I live in Meadow Valley. The project for Claremont is outstanding for me. I'm in my 70's and like to hike and mountain bike ride. This location should be ideal!Garrett Olney - 4/19/2020


These are incredible trails that bring visitors from all over the country to ride, keeping them in great shape is super important for tourism and local recreation.Elijah Grundel - 4/19/2020


It is imperative that funding for ground operations in the Quincy area be granted for this project. Outdoor recreation is a vital economic component of rural mountain communities in California's Sierra Nevada. Funding this work spurs visitors from all around the state, country and world to recreate in Plumas County, which in turn injects revenue into the community.James Bate - 4/20/2020


It is imperative that funding for ground operations in the Quincy area be granted for this project. Outdoor recreation is a vital economic component of rural mountain communities in California's Sierra Nevada. Funding this work spurs visitors from all around the state, country and world to recreate in Plumas County, which in turn injects revenue into the community.James Bate - 4/20/2020


It is imperative that funding for ground operations in the Quincy area be granted for this project. Outdoor recreation is a vital economic component of rural mountain communities in California's Sierra Nevada. Funding this work spurs visitors from all around the state, country and world to recreate in Plumas County, which in turn injects revenue into the community.James Bate - 4/20/2020


I writing to express my support for phase 2 of recreational trail projects on Mt. Hough. I believe that the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has already shown how well made trails can have a positive impact on a small community. Not only through enhanced recreational opportunities, but through job creation and recreational visitors who come to town and spend money. Because of the trails on Mt. Hough, I come to Quincy regularly in the spring, summer, and fall to ride my bike, and when I do I spend money at local restaurants and bars, food stores, and gas stations. I think that the creation of even more sustainably built and well maintained trails will only benefit local and visiting recreationists of all types (OHV/Moto included) as well as the local and regional economy. Thanks, Jeremy BensonJeremy Benson - 4/20/2020


Please Support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship with these grants. I am a mountain biker and travel from Chico regularly to ride these trails. I see that they need regular maintenance and would hate to see them fall into disrepair. The work SBTS does is fantastic and professional.Andrew Grayson - 4/20/2020


Please Support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship with these grants. I am a mountain biker and travel from Chico regularly to ride these trails. I see that they need regular maintenance and would hate to see them fall into disrepair. The work SBTS does is fantastic and professional.Andrew Grayson - 4/20/2020


Please Support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship with these grants. I am a mountain biker and travel from Chico regularly to ride in the area. I would love to see new trails in this area. The work SBTS does is fantastic and professional.Andrew Grayson - 4/20/2020


The trail projects that the SBTS plan and implement are sustainable and very low maintenance. These trails not only provide great recreation opportunities for locals and tourists but provide a big boost to the economies of the small towns of Plumas County. I am in support of this project please approve the grant. Thank you.Kirk Lambert - 4/20/2020


The projects that the SBTS plans and implements provide not only excellent recreation opportunities for locals and also travelers but will also provide an economic boost to the towns in Plumas County. SBTS has been building low maintenance and sustainable trails for over 15 years. I support this grant project, please approve the grant. Thank you.Kirk Lambert - 4/20/2020


The trail systems in Plumas County not only provide recreation opportunities for the residents and tourists but also provide a great economic component for our small towns. The SBTS builds sustainable and low maintenance trails that will be used for many years. Please approve this grant the project. Thank you.Kirk Lambert - 4/20/2020


I was happy to get to explore the Mt Hough area and it brought my friends and I to the Quincy area more than a few times! we loved the co-op, the trails, the Feather River. Had to stop at the auto parts store a couple times. I have nothing but great things to say about Mt Hough and Fillmore after riding several times in the area. I look forward to the riding season when these trails open up and a few trail days make the whole mountain rideable. My hats off to you guys for doing such an excellent job building and maintaining the trails. We look forward to returning this season!Colin P Shea - 4/20/2020


Id Love to see more trails on Mt Hough. Everyone I've seen there has been conscientious and friendly. I've had people ask if I was ok on trails when i was pulled off. Nothing but posituve experiences at the trailheads, on the summit, and on the trails themselves. Expanding the trail network would further disperse the mountain biking community in an enjoyable and manageable way. Colin P Shea - 4/20/2020


I support this application for the multiple benefits it provides via a sustainable economy for the local community and the recreation opportunities it will create to draw visitors to this region. The work the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is top notch. Expanding this network to all parts of the county will expand the economic benefits to all residents.Arnold Ambiel - 4/20/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance where ever it operates. I am very impressed with their work to include all trail users and their choices of trails to meet these endsArnold Ambiel - 4/20/2020


I support SBTS' application to provide environmental planning and analysis on adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trails. Determining where and how to add additional trails in this area is a skill that the SBTS has carefully developed over the past several years. They use local talent and resources to provide these services that visitors like myself and my family will be able to utilize when built. Their vision for a trail connected Plumas County is inspiring.Arnold Ambiel - 4/20/2020


Hi, Please fund the environmental planning for adding 40 miles of trail to the Claremont zone, connecting existing campgrounds and trails. On behalf of Reno Area Dirt Riders, we will support the project with volunteer hours whenever possible. Thank you! Don Schmidt Reno Area Dirt RidersDon Schmidt - 4/20/2020


Please fund the grant for 30+ miles of new trails on the Mt. Hough Trail System. Reno Area Dirt Riders, a local 501c7 club, will help with volunteer hours whenever possible. Thank you! Don Schmidt Reno Area Dirt RidersDon Schmidt - 4/20/2020


On behalf of Reno Area Dirt Rider, please fund this grant for trail maintenance for trails in the Mt. Hough area. We will support with volunteer hours whenever possible. Thank you. Don Schmidt Reno Area Dirt Riders.Don Schmidt - 4/20/2020


I very much support the work that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does and believe they should receive the grants for which they have applied. The work they have done thus far in Downieville and Mt. Hough has created wonderful opportunities for recreation and brought much needed tourist dollars to the area. The future work they are hoping to do will undoubtedly build on that create an even greater example of what can be achieved with local and state cooperation. Please approve the grant applications filed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you.Bill Engelhhardt - 4/20/2020


I very much support the work that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does and believe they should receive the grants for which they have applied. The work they have done thus far in Downieville and Mt. Hough has created wonderful opportunities for recreation and brought much needed tourist dollars to the area. The future work they are hoping to do will undoubtedly build on that create an even greater example of what can be achieved with local and state cooperation. Please approve the grant applications filed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you.Bill Engelhhardt - 4/20/2020


I very much support the work that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does and believe they should receive the grants for which they have applied. The work they have done thus far in Downieville and Mt. Hough has created wonderful opportunities for recreation and brought much needed tourist dollars to the area. The future work they are hoping to do will undoubtedly build on that create an even greater example of what can be achieved with local and state cooperation. Please approve the grant applications filed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you.Bill Engelhhardt - 4/20/2020


Please support SBTS with this grantRob Shanks - 4/20/2020


Please support SBTS with this grantRob Shanks - 4/20/2020


Please support SBTS with this grantRob Shanks - 4/20/2020


This area has incredible recreation opportunities and amazing trails that I really want to continue exploring on my mountain bike. Trail maintenance is what will keep this area fun to ride and one of my favorite destinations. Isabella - 4/21/2020


This is area is incredible with so many opportunities for amazing trails that have yet to be built so I can't wait to see what can be created with enough funding. I'm sure that new trails will draw more people to the area and help boost the local economies. Isabella - 4/21/2020


By creating even more trails, this area could become my number one mountain bike destination where I can enjoy the magnificent natural scenery, support local communities, and share adventures with many friends. This place is 100% worth trail development in an environmentally conscious way. Isabella - 4/21/2020


I would not know about Downieville, Quincy or Graeagle if it wasn't for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and Yuba Expeditions. For the last 10 years, I have been heading up to those communities to ride amazing trails, stay at hotels, camp and eat at restaurants. I have gotten my friends to join me on guys trips to the mountains and they are all hooked. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has done so much for those communities and in helping people lead healthier more fulfilled lives. I have taken my family up there for the trail days and have helped to maintain the trails because it is such a great organization and they do great work. Hopefully they will receive this grant so they can continue to provide fiscal stimulus to these communities and employment for people who are working to make their communities better. Thank you, Terry Blesso Physical Education Teacher Mountain Bike Coach Vista del Lago High SchoolTerry Blesso - 4/21/2020


I would not know about Downieville, Quincy or Graeagle if it wasn't for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and Yuba Expeditions. For the last 10 years, I have been heading up to those communities to ride amazing trails, stay at hotels, camp and eat at restaurants. I have gotten my friends to join me on guys trips to the mountains and they are all hooked. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has done so much for those communities and in helping people lead healthier more fulfilled lives. I have taken my family up there for the trail days and have helped to maintain the trails because it is such a great organization and they do great work. Hopefully they will receive this grant so they can continue to provide fiscal stimulus to these communities and employment for people who are working to make their communities better. Thank you, Terry Blesso Physical Education Teacher Mountain Bike Coach Vista del Lago High SchoolTerry Blesso - 4/21/2020


I would not know about Downieville, Quincy or Graeagle if it wasn't for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and Yuba Expeditions. For the last 10 years, I have been heading up to those communities to ride amazing trails, stay at hotels, camp and eat at restaurants. I have gotten my friends to join me on guys trips to the mountains and they are all hooked. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has done so much for those communities and in helping people lead healthier more fulfilled lives. I have taken my family up there for the trail days and have helped to maintain the trails because it is such a great organization and they do great work. Hopefully they will receive this grant so they can continue to provide fiscal stimulus to these communities and employment for people who are working to make their communities better. Thank you, Terry Blesso Physical Education Teacher Mountain Bike Coach Vista del Lago High SchoolTerry Blesso - 4/21/2020


We are starting to visit this region more often and hope to retire here someday. As part of this process, we are bringing the kids up here to discover this region and foster trail stewardship thru the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Please consider and approve the grant to develop these new trails!George Astin - 4/22/2020


These projects are definitely important for the local economy in a number of ways. They offer a positive impact to the counties in the form of additional recreational opportunities for visitors and locals and local employment. They are also good for our public lands by creating sustainable trails systems that can remain open and safe while protecting California's critical watersheds. Please support this.Ben V Edwards - 4/22/2020


These projects are definitely important for the local economy in a number of ways. They offer a positive impact to the counties in the form of additional recreational opportunities for visitors and locals and local employment. They are also good for our public lands by creating sustainable trails systems that can remain open and safe while protecting California's critical watersheds. Please support this.Ben V Edwards - 4/22/2020


These projects are definitely important for the local economy in a number of ways. They offer a positive impact to the counties in the form of additional recreational opportunities for visitors and locals and local employment. They are also good for our public lands by creating sustainable trails systems that can remain open and safe while protecting California's critical watersheds. Please support this.Ben V Edwards - 4/22/2020


The trails have users, and the dust needs to stay out of the water shed. This grant needs to happen.chris atkinson - 4/22/2020


The trails have users, and the dust needs to stay out of the water shed. This grant needs to happen.chris atkinson - 4/22/2020


The trails have users, and the dust needs to stay out of the water shed. This grant needs to happen.chris atkinson - 4/22/2020


I support SBTS and ask that you partner with them and award them grants to continue the work the trail work that they do. Trails are a valuable public asset to recreate in nature and also an economic engine for this portion of the Sierra. Scott Bartlebaugh - 4/22/2020


I support SBTS and ask that you partner with them and award them grants to continue the work the trail work that they do. Trails are a valuable public asset to recreate in nature and also an economic engine for this portion of the Sierra. Scott Bartlebaugh - 4/22/2020


I support SBTS and ask that you partner with them and award them grants to continue the work the trail work that they do. Trails are a valuable public asset to recreate in nature and also an economic engine for this portion of the Sierra. Scott Bartlebaugh - 4/22/2020


I would like to encourage the CA Parks to pursue environmental planning and analysis on adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trails.Colin Duwe - 4/23/2020


I would like to urge the CA Parks to work on the development project with SBTS. The development of the Mt Hough trail system is so exciting. It will draw lots of visitors to a rarely-visited part of the state.Colin Duwe - 4/23/2020


I would like to urge the CA Parks to work on the development project with SBTS. The development of the Mt Hough trail system is so exciting. It will draw lots of visitors to a rarely-visited part of the state.Colin Duwe - 4/23/2020


I would like to urge the CA Parks to work on the development project with SBTS. The development of the Mt Hough trail system is so exciting. It will draw lots of visitors to a rarely-visited part of the state.Colin Duwe - 4/23/2020


Developing mountain bike trails on Mt. Hough will be a great way to bolster tourism in the area. I've ridden the mountain bike trail developed on Mt Hough a few years ago and it is fantastic. I have now been there 5 times and plan on going a lot in the future. Every time my friends and I go we spend money in Quincy and the surrounding area. This is a great way to have sustainable economic development.Scott Anderson - 4/25/2020


Maintaining the current set of trail systems is vital to keeping the environmental impact of the trails to a minimum and while enhancing their use. This maintenance also provides jobs and tourism money for the area. Scott Anderson - 4/25/2020


I am excited that you are considering the Claremont Planning grant.This will provide a critical analysis to assess the potential impacts and benefits of these proposed trail programs. I support this application and appreciate the opportunity to comment.Erik Ringelberg - 4/26/2020


I would like to speak out in support of expansion of trails, particularly motorized singletrack, in the Claremont area. Please do what you can to continue this development!Evan Freeman - 4/27/2020


I would like to speak out in support of expansion of trails, particularly motorized singletrack, in the Mt Hough area. The current trail system has brought many visitors to enjoy the area. Please do what you can to continue this development!Evan Freeman - 4/27/2020


I would like to speak out in support of expansion and maintenance of trails, particularly motorized singletrack, in Plumas County. The expansions and maintenance of trails has so far brought many visitors to enjoy the area. Please do what you can to continue this development!Evan Freeman - 4/27/2020


To whom it may concern: Please support this grant. Reasons: Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals Creates local employment Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed thank you!Garrett Morrow - 4/27/2020


To whom it may concern: Please support this grant. Reasons: Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals Creates local employment Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed thank you!Garrett Morrow - 4/27/2020


To whom it may concern: Please support this grant. Reasons: Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals Creates local employment Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed thank you!Garrett Morrow - 4/27/2020


As a nearby resident I frequently use the trails in this area for recreation and know many others who do too. I support multi-use of these trails as I enjoy mountain biking, dirt biking and hiking. While on the trails I have met individuals from all over the country coming to this area for the recreation opportunity. It's important that these trails are maintained and more trails are built to support connectivity throughout the area. As such I urge you to approve this grant for the SBTS project. Peter Pensotti - 4/27/2020


As a nearby resident I frequently use the trails in this area for recreation and know many others who do too. I support multi-use of these trails as I enjoy mountain biking, dirt biking and hiking. While on the trails I have met individuals from all over the country coming to this area for the recreation opportunity. It's important that these trails are maintained and more trails are built to support connectivity throughout the area. As such I urge you to approve this grant for the SBTS project. Peter Pensotti - 4/27/2020


As a nearby resident I frequently use the trails in this area for recreation and know many others who do too. I support multi-use of these trails as I enjoy mountain biking, dirt biking and hiking. While on the trails I have met individuals from all over the country coming to this area for the recreation opportunity. It's important that these trails are maintained and more trails are built to support connectivity throughout the area. As such I urge you to approve this grant for the SBTS project. Peter Pensotti - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, My name is Tim Rhode. I am a lifelong resident of Plumas County I am writing this letter to show my support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating outdoor recreational opportunities for local residents and visitors to our area. Having these visitors in our area would provide a boost to our local economy. Our communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and maintain a thriving community. I look forward forward seeing this project come to fruition. It will be a positive impact on our county. I will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way I can. Thank you for your time, Tim Rhode Tim Rhode - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, My name is Tim Rhode. I am a lifelong resident of Plumas County I am writing this letter to show my support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating outdoor recreational opportunities for local residents and visitors to our area. Having these visitors in our area would provide a boost to our local economy. Our communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and maintain a thriving community. I look forward forward seeing this project come to fruition. It will be a positive impact on our county. I will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way I can. Thank you for your time, Tim Rhode Tim Rhode - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, My name is Tim Rhode. I am a lifelong resident of Plumas County I am writing this letter to show my support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating outdoor recreational opportunities for local residents and visitors to our area. Having these visitors in our area would provide a boost to our local economy. Our communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and maintain a thriving community. I look forward forward seeing this project come to fruition. It will be a positive impact on our county. I will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way I can. Thank you for your time, Tim Rhode Tim Rhode - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, Our organization, TRAC, works in partnership with the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. We are writing this letter to show our support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating community partnerships for land stewardship and is identified in the U.S. Forest Service, National Strategy for Sustainable Trail Systems. In addition, it will benefit the communities throughout Plumas County. These communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and sustain a thriving community. TRAC is looking forward seeing this project come to fruition as it will be very beneficial to our area. We will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way we can. On behalf of all TRAC members, thank you for your time. Best Regards, Casey Williams TRAC Representative Casey Williams - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, Our organization, TRAC, works in partnership with the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. We are writing this letter to show our support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating community partnerships for land stewardship and is identified in the U.S. Forest Service, National Strategy for Sustainable Trail Systems. In addition, it will benefit the communities throughout Plumas County. These communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and sustain a thriving community. TRAC is looking forward seeing this project come to fruition as it will be very beneficial to our area. We will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way we can. On behalf of all TRAC members, thank you for your time. Best Regards, Casey Williams TRAC Representative Casey Williams - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, Our organization, TRAC, works in partnership with the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. We are writing this letter to show our support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating community partnerships for land stewardship and is identified in the U.S. Forest Service, National Strategy for Sustainable Trail Systems. In addition, it will benefit the communities throughout Plumas County. These communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and sustain a thriving community. TRAC is looking forward seeing this project come to fruition as it will be very beneficial to our area. We will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way we can. On behalf of all TRAC members, thank you for your time. Best Regards, Casey Williams TRAC Representative Casey Williams - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, Our organization, TRAC, works in partnership with the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. We are writing this letter to show our support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to develop a CA OHV trail grant in Plumas County. Establishing an OHV trail is an integral part of creating community partnerships for land stewardship and is identified in the U.S. Forest Service, National Strategy for Sustainable Trail Systems. In addition, it will benefit the communities throughout Plumas County. These communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and sustain a thriving community. TRAC is looking forward seeing this project come to fruition as it will be very beneficial to our area. We will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way we can. On behalf of all TRAC members, thank you for your time. Best Regards, Casey Williams TRAC Representative Casey Williams - 4/27/2020


There are great benefits to developing more trails and connecting communities in Plumas County. It would be a wonderful resource to have these campgrounds in the South Clairmont zone connected by a trail system. Please aid Plumas County in further developing a trail system and increasing their economic base. Thank you , Scott Kessler Scott Kessler - 4/27/2020


Please award this grant to Plumas County so that the trails in the MT Hough / Quincy area can be maintained for all user groups. I have enjoyed visiting the town of Quincy solely based on the Mt Hough trail system. Scott Kessler Scott Kessler - 4/27/2020


Hello, I'm writing in support of Plumas County Trail Planning on Claremont. I'm part of a coalition coordinating a large scale project called Orogenesis. (https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.html) It's a long distance backcountry mountain bike route spanning from Canada to Baja California. Just like the Pacific Crest Trail but for people on bikes. All told it's about 4,500 miles (!) long and about 30-40% singletrack trail. We have growing support from land managers, politicians, and rural communities throughout California, Oregon, and Washington and about 140 scouts out searching for lost trail connections on our public lands. We've identified our preferred alignment and it currently travels through Downieville, Quincy and towards Susanville and the Oregon border. Visions like the Sierra Buttes Connected Communities are exactly the type of recreation planning we support and seek to prioritize all along the length of Orogenesis. While the Orogenesis project is large and inspirational for most off road cyclists, it's projects at the local level like SBTS Connected Communities that offer an opportunity to experience something larger during a day or weekend trip. Trail system hubs like Claremont along the whole route will create loop riding options the right length for people to recreate and then spend time and money in the local communities. Here in Oregon we found that approximately 75% of Oregon Timber Trail riders like to camp and do day rides, where only about 8% are thru-riding the whole trail. In the Oregon Timber Trail's small gateway community of Oakridge a study found that mountain bikers spend $2.3-4.9 Million each year. This project, and other projects like it, fills that experience gap that's in high demand. Over 3,000 people from 28 different countries have downloaded the Oregon Timber Trail route guide and we expect the draw of Orogenesis to be even greater. We want to foster this increased interest in recreation near rural communities to create positive experiences for people recreating, as well as improve the livelihoods of the people living in these communities. Please contact me if you have any further questions, I'm looking forward to supporting this project throughout its lifespan and hopefully riding it (or volunteering on it) someday soon! Thanks for your consideration, Gabriel Amadeus Tiller (503) 381-4456 Executive Director, Oregon Timber Trail Alliance https://oregontimbertrail.org/ Founding member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition https://www.ormtbcoalition.org/ Board member, Bikepacking Roots https://www.bikepackingroots.org A new way on old ground, Orogenesis Collective https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.htmlGabriel Amadeus Tiller - 4/27/2020


Hello, I'm writing in support of Plumas County Trail Development. I'm part of a coalition coordinating a large scale project called Orogenesis. (https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.html) It's a long distance backcountry mountain bike route spanning from Canada to Baja California. Just like the Pacific Crest Trail but for people on bikes. All told it's about 4,500 miles (!) long and about 30-40% singletrack trail. We have growing support from land managers, politicians, and rural communities throughout California, Oregon, and Washington and about 140 scouts out searching for lost trail connections on our public lands. We've identified our preferred alignment and it currently travels through Quincy and over Mt Hough to Taylorsville. Visions like the Sierra Buttes Connected Communities are exactly the type of recreation planning we support and seek to prioritize all along the length of Orogenesis. While the Orogenesis project is large and inspirational for most off road cyclists, it's projects at the local level like SBTS Connected Communities that offer an opportunity to experience something larger during a day or weekend trip. Trail system hubs like this along the whole route will create loop riding options the right length for people to recreate and then spend time and money in the local communities. Here in Oregon we found that approximately 75% of Oregon Timber Trail riders like to camp and do day rides, where only about 8% are thru-riding the whole trail. In the Oregon Timber Trail's small gateway community of Oakridge a study found that mountain bikers spend $2.3-4.9 Million each year. This maintenance project, and other projects like it, fills that experience gap that's in high demand. Over 3,000 people from 28 different countries have downloaded the Oregon Timber Trail route guide and we expect the draw of Orogenesis to be even greater. We want to foster this increased interest in recreation near rural communities to create positive experiences for people recreating, as well as improve the livelihoods of the people living in these communities. Please contact me if you have any further questions, I'm looking forward to supporting this project throughout its lifespan and hopefully riding it (or volunteering on it) someday soon! Thanks for your consideration, Gabriel Amadeus Tiller (503) 381-4456 Executive Director, Oregon Timber Trail Alliance https://oregontimbertrail.org/ Founding member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition https://www.ormtbcoalition.org/ Board member, Bikepacking Roots https://www.bikepackingroots.org A new way on old ground, Orogenesis Collective https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.htmlGabriel Amadeus Tiller - 4/27/2020


Hello, I'm writing in support of Plumas County Ground Operations. I'm part of a coalition coordinating a large scale project called Orogenesis. (https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.html) It's a long distance backcountry mountain bike route spanning from Canada to Baja California. Just like the Pacific Crest Trail but for people on bikes. All told it's about 4,500 miles (!) long and about 30-40% singletrack trail. We have growing support from land managers, politicians, and rural communities throughout California, Oregon, and Washington and about 140 scouts out searching for lost trail connections on our public lands. We've identified our preferred alignment and it currently travels through Quincy and Taylorsville utilizing the trail systems on Claremont and Mt Hough. Visions like the Sierra Buttes Connected Communities are exactly the type of recreation planning we support and seek to prioritize all along the length of Orogenesis. While the Orogenesis project is large and inspirational for most off road cyclists, it's projects at the local level like SBTS Connected Communities that offer an opportunity to experience something larger during a day or weekend trip. Trail system hubs like this along the whole route will create loop riding options the right length for people to recreate and then spend time and money in the local communities. Here in Oregon we found that approximately 75% of Oregon Timber Trail riders like to camp and do day rides, where only about 8% are thru-riding the whole trail. This maintenance project, and other projects like it, fills that experience gap that's in high demand. Over 3,000 people from 28 different countries have downloaded the Oregon Timber Trail route guide and we expect the draw of Orogenesis to be even greater. We want to foster this increased interest in recreation near rural communities to create positive experiences for people recreating, as well as improve the livelihoods of the people living in these communities. Please contact me if you have any further questions, I'm looking forward to supporting this project throughout its lifespan and hopefully riding it someday soon! Thanks for your consideration, Gabriel Amadeus Tiller (503) 381-4456 Executive Director, Oregon Timber Trail Alliance https://oregontimbertrail.org/ Founding member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition https://www.ormtbcoalition.org/ Board member, Bikepacking Roots https://www.bikepackingroots.org A new way on old ground, Orogenesis Collective https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.htmlGabriel Amadeus Tiller - 4/27/2020


This looks really promising. I'd love to see some additional trails in this area.Marcus Alexander - 4/27/2020


CommThese guys are doing an amazing job and absolutely deserve our continuing support!entMarcus Alexander - 4/27/2020


This is an awesome project in a great area. I've loved riding here and look forward to having more trails available.Marcus Alexander - 4/27/2020


As a long time lover of the Mt. Hough trails, and the community of Quincy in general, I am a big proponent of additional trails and maintenance of existing trails. Mountain bikers and other trail users bring a positive influence to the surrounding communities, and help promote the local economies as well. As more and more people discover mountain biking, they will flock to a trail system like Hough, and more trails will help disperse the crowds and provide something for everyone. Please approve this program! Thanks for your consideration. Murphy Gardner - 4/28/2020


This program is a necessary step to keep pace with the fast growing mountain bike community. Not only will it provide many more miles of trails to explore and enjoy the beautiful area, it will also spread out the crowds and offer something for every skill level. It is intimidating for a beginner to get blown by a group of rippers at high speeds, and as more and more people discover mountain biking, this will be a common occurrence if there aren't sufficient trails. The capacity for more trail users also means economic boosts for the surrounding communities. Bike shops, recreation outfitters, food stores, restaurants, bars, lodging, and all kinds of retail will benefit from the positive influx of the outdoor community. Thanks for considering this program. Murphy Gardner - 4/28/2020


The initial stages for new trail developments are crucial to ensure new networks will not disrupt fragile ecosystems, while providing plans for well built trails that will last, and benefit the watershed in terms of erosion control. The more trails connecting campgrounds to trailheads will lower the number of cars needing to park at the trailhead, and cut down on air pollution. Thanks for considering this program. Murphy Gardner - 4/28/2020


This project is an amazing effort and grass roots movement for both the local community and surrounding areas. I am part of a near by and robust community of trail biking enthusiast, we are all so excited for the further development of these trails by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. It offers a much needed opportunity to stimulate local economies and creates local employment. By creating sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance we can keeps the trails open and safe while protecting our watershed. Kenneth Huskey - 4/28/2020


This project is an amazing effort and grass roots movement for both the local community and surrounding areas. I am part of a near by and robust community of trail biking enthusiast, we are all so excited for the further development of these trails by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. It offers a much needed opportunity to stimulate local economies and creates local employment. By creating sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance we can keeps the trails open and safe while protecting our watershed.Kenneth Huskey - 4/28/2020


This project is an amazing effort and grass roots movement for both the local community and surrounding areas. I am part of a near by and robust community of trail biking enthusiast, we are all so excited for the further development of these trails by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. It offers a much needed opportunity to stimulate local economies and creates local employment. By creating sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance we can keeps the trails open and safe while protecting our watershed.Kenneth Huskey - 4/28/2020


Hello! I am writing to communicate how important trail maintenance is on 70+ miles of trail including Mt Hough Trail System, Claremont, Nelson Creek, Mt Fillmore. Trail systems like this are not only ridden locally, but used for connectivity between parts of CA and the western US in general! Bikepackers and day riders alike tend to spend their vacation time and dollars in communities with trail access! Please support the funding of the maintenance of the trails in this area! Thank you, Heather Rose Goleta, CAHeather Rose - 4/28/2020


Hello! I am writing in support of the construction of 30+ miles of new trail on the Mt Hough Trail System! I have traveled all over the US and beyond by mountain bike and connecting trails such as those proposed here are critical for safe continuous human powered traveled! Cyclist enjoy both local and long distance trails and tend to spend our vacation dollars enjoying locations such as this! Thank you for considering. Heather Rose Goleta, CAHeather Rose - 4/28/2020


Hello! I am writing in support of the environmental planning and analysis on adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trails! I have traveled all over the US and beyond by mountain bike and connecting trails such as those proposed here are critical for safe continuous human powered traveled! Cyclist enjoy both local and long distance trails and tend to spend our vacation dollars enjoying locations such as this! Thank you for considering. Heather Rose Goleta, CAHeather Rose - 4/28/2020


The mission of Friends of Plumas Wilderness is to study, explore, and maintain the integrity of natural ecosystems where the Sierra and Cascades meet. Since 1974 our organization has been working to conserve roadless areas on the Plumas National Forest. Friends of Plumas Wilderness strongly supports Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship’s Connected Communities – Claremont Planning effort. The Connected Communities concept provides recreation opportunities close to places where people live and a vision to increase tourism in our region. The President of our all-volunteer, grass-roots conservation organization has met with our Congressional representative and voiced his support for Connected Communities and has worked with Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship staff to insure their vision of trails connecting communities complements Friends of Plumas Wilderness’s vision of formally protecting 30% of unique lands on the Plumas National Forest by 2030. One aspect of the Connected Communities project which Friends of Plumas Wilderness strongly urges to be dropped from the Claremont Planning effort is the proposal to make the Bachs Creek Trail motorized which is the proposed connector trail between 24N26B and 23N92A. Friends of Plumas Wilderness is adamantly opposed to the proposal to make this route motorized as it is: 1) along the Wild & Scenic Middle Fork of the Feather River, 2) in the Little Volcano proposed Special Interest Area, 3) within the Middle Fork Inventoried Roadless Area, 4) not an essential route for the Connected Communities project, and 5) an historic non-motorized route established by miners. Additionally, Friend of Plumas Wilderness is opposed to the proposal of an addition of a motorized trail from Red Bridge Campground to 23N9 as it is: 1) along the Wild & Scenic Middle Fork of the Feather River, 2) within the Middle Fork Inventoried Roadless Area, 3) not an essential route for the Connected Communities project. The Middle Fork of the Feather River was one of eight Wild & Scenic Rivers protected with the passage of the Act in 1968. The Wild & Scenic Rivers Act states Wild River Areas are generally accessible only by (non-motorized) trail. The proposal to connect 24N26B (Crescent Hill Road) and 23N92A (Lost Cabin Springs Road) via the Bachs Creek Trail and the Red Bridge Campground to 23N9 trail would create motorized routes within the Upper Canyon Wild Zone of the Middle Fork Wild & Scenic River, which violates the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. The National Forest Management Act of 1976 requires that each National Forest write a Land Management Plan. In an appeal to the 1988 Plumas National Forest Plan, the California Native Plant Society was assured that any future planning efforts undertaken by the Plumas National Forest would address Special Interest Areas proposed by that group. The proposal to connect the Crescent Hill and Lost Cabin Springs roads via a motorized route would bisect the Little Volcano Proposed Special Interest Area. This area may contain unique wildlife, including invertebrates and salamanders typically associated with limestone caves like Little Volcano. Creating a motorized route in the Proposed Special Interest Area could threaten unique wildlife. The Middle Fork Inventoried Roadless Area was established when the Forest Service implemented the Roadless Area Conservation Rule in 2001. At 27,000 acres, the Middle Fork Inventoried Roadless Area is the largest remaining roadless area on the Plumas National Forest. The Plumas National Forest has determined that road construction or reconstruction is not allowed in this portion of the Inventoried Roadless Area. The proposal to connect the Crescent Hill and Lost Cabin Springs roads via a motorized route would dissect this un-roaded area and eliminate over 2,000 acres from the Inventoried Roadless Area. This would be in violation of the Roadless Area Conservation Rule and Plumas National Forest direction. The Bachs Creek Trail is not an essential component of the Connected Communities vision. An alternate route is available north of Little Volcano. Friends of Plumas Wilderness supports the development of a motorized route along Willow Creek and north of Little Volcano as proposed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Friends of Plumas Wilderness is opposed to the creation of a motorized route from the Red Bridge Campground to 23N92 as proposed on the Draft Claremont Planning Map. Like the proposal to make the Bachs Creek Trail motorized, the proposed development of this motorized route is redundant and would degrade unique recreation opportunities available along the Wild & Scenic Middle Fork Feather River. Friends of Plumas wilderness is not opposed to the alternative motorized single track along 23N92 to Quincy-LaPorte Road. The Bachs Creek Trail is an historic mining trail. Today, the Bachs Creek Trail is primarily used by anglers to access the Middle Fork Feather River. Friends of the Plumas Wilderness reached out to a number of individuals that use this hiking trail in its current form. Every person that FoPW spoke to was against changing the designation of this trail from non-motorized to motorized. In addition, Friends of Plumas Wilderness is likewise opposed to the creation of a motorized route from the Red Bridge Campground to 23N92 as proposed on the Draft Claremont Planning Map. Like the proposal to make the Bachs Creek Trail motorized, the proposed development of this motorized route is redundant and would degrade unique recreation opportunities available along the Wild & Scenic Middle Fork Feather River. Friends of Plumas Wilderness is aware that the Bachs Creek Trail needs maintenance and would be happy to partner with Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to obtain funding to restore this historic mining trail, as we have done to maintain other hiking trails along the Middle Fork Feather River. For the many reasons expressed above, we are strongly opposed to the motorized development of the Bachs Creek Trail, Red Bridge Campground to 23N92, and any other future trail proposals along the Wild & Scenic Middle Fork Feather River. For the reasons mentioned above Friends of Plumas Wilderness requests to be invited to participate in the planning phase of this project to ensure the continued protection of the Middle Fork Feather River Wild and Scenic River. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant proposal. Friends of Plumas Wilderness Darrel Jury - 4/29/2020


Please support the SBTC with available Grants to facilitate Plumas County trail permitting, construction and maintenance of existing and proposed trails. Continued Trail access is a vital part of the Town and local economies that rely on outdoor recreation. These trails should be multi use, providing for Hiking, mountain biking and Class ! pedal assisted e-bike usage. A network of connected trails is beneficial to the local communities and fulfills regional agencies charter to provide and expand recreation opportunities. The SBTC has demonstrated a great ability to partner with private and public to accomplish this mission. Cruz Arnett - 4/30/2020


Please support available Grants and funding to facilitate Plumas County trail permitting, construction and maintenance of existing and proposed trails. Continued Trail access is a vital part of the Town and local economies that rely on outdoor recreation. These trails should be multi use, providing for Hiking, mountain biking and Class ! pedal assisted e-bike usage. A network of connected trails is beneficial to the local communities and fulfills regional agencies charter to provide and expand recreation opportunities. Cruz Arnett - 4/30/2020


I support the SBTS grant request for maintenance activities in Plumas County. These OHV trails are an important recreation and tourism resource in the area and this kind of trail work is necessary to keep the trails safe and minimizes harmful environmental effects. Please support the SBTS as they work to protect and improve valuable trail infrastructure in Plumas County.Jonathan Mahowald - 5/1/2020


I just wanted to write quickly in support of the SBTS grant request for Claremont Planning. The organization greatly benefits the rural economies AND forestland through appropriate management, upkeep and maintainance of trails used by a wide variety of individuals for purposes of exercise and recreation. Through these systems, a greater number of people gain easy, _safe_ (for humans and the ecosystem), access and exposure to outdoors. In addition, multiple towns and municipalities have benefited for tourism brought though hiking, cycling and related activities. With the benefit of tourism to communities which otherwise don’t benefit from tourist traffic, businesses are better able to remain healthy when so many small towns are struggling against migration to metropolitan areas. For these reasons and more, I ask that you support safe access to the forests, improved forest monitoring and management, and rural communities by extending this grant to an organization that has repeatedly proven to have both good intent, and action. Thank you.Michael Stofan - 5/1/2020


I just wanted to write quickly in support of the SBTS grant request for Plumas County Ground Operation. The organization greatly benefits the rural economies AND forestland through appropriate management, upkeep and maintainance of trails used by a wide variety of individuals for purposes of exercise and recreation. Through these systems, a greater number of people gain easy, _safe_ (for humans and the ecosystem), access and exposure to outdoors. In addition, multiple towns and municipalities have benefited for tourism brought though hiking, cycling and related activities. With the benefit of tourism to communities which otherwise don’t benefit from tourist traffic, businesses are better able to remain healthy when so many small towns are struggling against migration to metropolitan areas. For these reasons and more, I ask that you support safe access to the forests, improved forest monitoring and management, and rural communities by extending this grant to an organization that has repeatedly proven to have both good intent, and action. Thank you.Michael Stofan - 5/1/2020


I just wanted to write quickly in support of the SBTS grant request for Mt Hough Phase II Development. The organization greatly benefits the rural economies AND forestland through appropriate management, upkeep and maintenance of trails used by a wide variety of individuals for purposes of exercise and recreation. Through these systems, a greater number of people gain easy, _safe_ (for humans and the ecosystem), access and exposure to outdoors. In addition, multiple towns and municipalities have benefited for tourism brought though hiking, cycling and related activities. With the benefit of tourism to communities which otherwise don’t benefit from tourist traffic, businesses are better able to remain healthy when so many small towns are struggling against migration to metropolitan areas. For these reasons and more, I ask that you support safe access to the forests, improved forest monitoring and management, and rural communities by extending this grant to an organization that has repeatedly proven to have both good intent, and action. Thank you.Michael Stofan - 5/1/2020


The trail system in our area is a huge positive for both recreation and our local economy. The work that SBTS has done in the past proves that their vision is supported by people both locally and from afar. The trails they have built on Mt. Hough are direct evidence that they bring people to the forest in a way that protects the forest while enabling people to enjoy the beauty and solace that connection with nature brings. Never before have we needed opportunities like this trail system as much as with the Covid-19 restrictions. People need ways to recreate and connect with nature that is safe and healthy. These trails fit that bill perfectly. The work SBTS has done in the past has brought people from outside the area to enjoy recreation and when they come, they spend money. Our local community struggles economically so the boost that these trails has caused is vital to our community now and into the future. Please support stewardship in creating more recreation assets that we all can enjoy.Jennifer Lacy - 5/2/2020


Please support this proposal to add additional miles to the Mt. Hough trail system. SBTS has proven their ability to build attractive, sustainable trails and it's putting this area on the map for those seeking new mountain biking and hiking options, which is helping our local economy. Recreation is a healthy, stable economic engine that is much needed in this struggling rural area. In addition, it's good for the local community to have additional avenues for recreation right in their backyard. SBTS's work creates immediate jobs and improves our local economy. Please let them continue their great work.Jennifer Lacy - 5/2/2020


SBTS has a solid track record of building and maintaining trails throughout this area. Their efforts have led to greater usage of our beautiful forests by locals and people from outside the area. And because of their experience and skills, the trails hold up better throughout weather cycles and increased usage. Getting local kids more into mountain biking and hiking is so important for their health and their appreciation of this precious natural resource. In addition, bringing outsiders to the area diversifies the economic basis of the Quincy area which is good for the local economy. Please support our local community and trails with this grant money.Jennifer Lacy - 5/2/2020


This is a win-win for all. Riders get to explore some beautiful areas in our great mountains and the locals that live in these communities get to earn a decent living without destroying the ecosystem. Truly sustainable living!Michael Cannon - 5/2/2020


This is a win-win for all. Riders get to explore some beautiful areas in our great mountains and the locals that live in these communities get to earn a decent living without destroying the ecosystem. Truly sustainable living!Michael Cannon - 5/2/2020


ComThis is a win-win for all. Riders get to explore some beautiful areas in our great mountains and the locals that live in these communities get to earn a decent living without destroying the ecosystem. Truly sustainable living!mentMichael Cannon - 5/2/2020


What were you thinking??? Mountain biking and trail-building destroy wildlife habitat! Mountain biking is environmentally, socially, and medically destructive! There is no good reason to allow bicycles on any unpaved trail! Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: https://mjvande.info/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking.... A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see https://mjvande.info/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions. Mountain bikers also love to build new trails - legally or illegally. Of course, trail-building destroys wildlife habitat - not just in the trail bed, but in a wide swath to both sides of the trail! E.g. grizzlies can hear a human from one mile away, and smell us from 5 miles away. Thus, a 10-mile trail represents 100 square miles of destroyed or degraded habitat, that animals are inhibited from using. Mountain biking, trail building, and trail maintenance all increase the number of people in the park, thereby preventing the animals' full use of their habitat. See https://mjvande.info/scb9.htm for details. Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT? To see exactly what harm mountain biking does to the land, watch this 5-minute video: http://vimeo.com/48784297. In addition to all of this, it is extremely dangerous: https://mjvande.info/mtb_dangerous.htm . For more information: https://mjvande.info/mtbfaq.htm . The common thread among those who want more recreation in our parks is total ignorance about and disinterest in the wildlife whose homes these parks are. Yes, if humans are the only beings that matter, it is simply a conflict among humans (but even then, allowing bikes on trails harms the MAJORITY of park users -- hikers and equestrians -- who can no longer safely and peacefully enjoy their parks). The parks aren't gymnasiums or racetracks or even human playgrounds. They are WILDLIFE HABITAT, which is precisely why they are attractive to humans. Activities such as mountain biking, that destroy habitat, violate the charter of the parks. Even kayaking and rafting, which give humans access to the entirety of a water body, prevent the wildlife that live there from making full use of their habitat, and should not be allowed. Of course those who think that only humans matter won't understand what I am talking about -- an indication of the sad state of our culture and educational system. Mike Vandeman - 5/3/2020


What were you thinking??? Mountain biking and trail-building destroy wildlife habitat! Mountain biking is environmentally, socially, and medically destructive! There is no good reason to allow bicycles on any unpaved trail! Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: https://mjvande.info/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking.... A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see https://mjvande.info/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions. Mountain bikers also love to build new trails - legally or illegally. Of course, trail-building destroys wildlife habitat - not just in the trail bed, but in a wide swath to both sides of the trail! E.g. grizzlies can hear a human from one mile away, and smell us from 5 miles away. Thus, a 10-mile trail represents 100 square miles of destroyed or degraded habitat, that animals are inhibited from using. Mountain biking, trail building, and trail maintenance all increase the number of people in the park, thereby preventing the animals' full use of their habitat. See https://mjvande.info/scb9.htm for details. Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT? To see exactly what harm mountain biking does to the land, watch this 5-minute video: http://vimeo.com/48784297. In addition to all of this, it is extremely dangerous: https://mjvande.info/mtb_dangerous.htm . For more information: https://mjvande.info/mtbfaq.htm . The common thread among those who want more recreation in our parks is total ignorance about and disinterest in the wildlife whose homes these parks are. Yes, if humans are the only beings that matter, it is simply a conflict among humans (but even then, allowing bikes on trails harms the MAJORITY of park users -- hikers and equestrians -- who can no longer safely and peacefully enjoy their parks). The parks aren't gymnasiums or racetracks or even human playgrounds. They are WILDLIFE HABITAT, which is precisely why they are attractive to humans. Activities such as mountain biking, that destroy habitat, violate the charter of the parks. Even kayaking and rafting, which give humans access to the entirety of a water body, prevent the wildlife that live there from making full use of their habitat, and should not be allowed. Of course those who think that only humans matter won't understand what I am talking about -- an indication of the sad state of our culture and educational system. Mike Vandeman - 5/3/2020


What were you thinking??? Mountain biking and trail-building destroy wildlife habitat! Mountain biking is environmentally, socially, and medically destructive! There is no good reason to allow bicycles on any unpaved trail! Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: https://mjvande.info/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking.... A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see https://mjvande.info/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions. Mountain bikers also love to build new trails - legally or illegally. Of course, trail-building destroys wildlife habitat - not just in the trail bed, but in a wide swath to both sides of the trail! E.g. grizzlies can hear a human from one mile away, and smell us from 5 miles away. Thus, a 10-mile trail represents 100 square miles of destroyed or degraded habitat, that animals are inhibited from using. Mountain biking, trail building, and trail maintenance all increase the number of people in the park, thereby preventing the animals' full use of their habitat. See https://mjvande.info/scb9.htm for details. Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT? To see exactly what harm mountain biking does to the land, watch this 5-minute video: http://vimeo.com/48784297. In addition to all of this, it is extremely dangerous: https://mjvande.info/mtb_dangerous.htm . For more information: https://mjvande.info/mtbfaq.htm . The common thread among those who want more recreation in our parks is total ignorance about and disinterest in the wildlife whose homes these parks are. Yes, if humans are the only beings that matter, it is simply a conflict among humans (but even then, allowing bikes on trails harms the MAJORITY of park users -- hikers and equestrians -- who can no longer safely and peacefully enjoy their parks). The parks aren't gymnasiums or racetracks or even human playgrounds. They are WILDLIFE HABITAT, which is precisely why they are attractive to humans. Activities such as mountain biking, that destroy habitat, violate the charter of the parks. Even kayaking and rafting, which give humans access to the entirety of a water body, prevent the wildlife that live there from making full use of their habitat, and should not be allowed. Of course those who think that only humans matter won't understand what I am talking about -- an indication of the sad state of our culture and educational system. Mike Vandeman - 5/3/2020


expansion of trails on Mt Hough will positively draw visitors to the area that spend money in town thus impact the economy in a positive way. building new trails will provide jobs in the area as well.kathykarlovic - 5/3/2020


funding here is critical for maintaining trail system, these trails draw many visitors who positively affect the economy in Plumas county.kathykarlovic - 5/3/2020


Trails are great for our area! Helps our community and our area. It would help my family directly. More trails could only lead to more people in the community being active and perhaps more influx of people coming to our town and spending money at local businesses! Jacquline Tardif - 5/3/2020


SBTS has done a tremendous job maintaining and creating backcountry access in the Quincy/Greaeagle area. My 6 person family recreates in the area which supports local businesses. We mountain bike, hike, trail run and use the area trail system extensively. We are residents of Plumas County and see trail system as part of our economic future.jeff dupras - 5/4/2020


SBTS has done a tremendous job maintaining and creating backcountry access in the Quincy/Greaeagle area. My 6 person family recreates in the area which supports local businesses. We mountain bike, hike, trail run and use the area trail system extensively. We are residents of Plumas County and see trail system as part of our economic future. New phases of trail planning and construction are crucial in the Lost Sierra economy. These trail systems are used by tourists from all over the country and folks from the outlying areas who frequent our local businesses. jeff dupras - 5/4/2020


I have recreated in the Plumas County since the early 2000s. Whenever I am in the area I make sure to spend some money in the local restaurants and grocery shops for food and whatever else I need. A strong OHV trail system is a powerful economic magnet for responsible outdoor recreation. I think these trails should be maintained and the trail network expanded. It is crucial that trails be FUN and SUSTAINABLE, for both excellent recreation and responsible environmental stewardship. Please fully fund this important grant. Thank you!Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I have recreated in the Plumas County since the early 2000s. I love this area of the Sierra, particularly the Mt Hough trail system. Whenever I am in the area I make sure to spend some money in the local restaurants and grocery shops for food and whatever else I need. A strong OHV trail system is a powerful economic magnet for responsible outdoor recreation. NEW trails keep citizens coming back to enjoy their national lands. I think these trails should be maintained and the trail network expanded. It is crucial that trails be FUN and SUSTAINABLE, for both excellent recreation and responsible environmental stewardship. Please fully fund this important grant. Thank you!Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I have recreated in the Plumas County since the early 2000s. Whenever I am in the area I make sure to spend some money in the local restaurants and grocery shops for food and whatever else I need. A strong OHV trail system is a powerful economic magnet for responsible outdoor recreation. I think these trails should be maintained and the trail network expanded. It is crucial that trails be FUN and SUSTAINABLE, for both excellent recreation and responsible environmental stewardship. Please fully fund this important grant. Thank you!Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra buttes stewardship and trail work. These trails are invaluable in providing local employment, encouraging visitors to recreate here bringing economic stimulus and providing for the environment with sustainable trails that help maintain the valuable watershed. Kim Delkener - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra buttes stewardship and trail work. These trails are invaluable in providing local employment, encouraging visitors to recreate here bringing economic stimulus and providing for the environment with sustainable trails that help maintain the valuable watershed. Kim Delkener - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra buttes stewardship and trail work. These trails are invaluable in providing local employment, encouraging visitors to recreate here bringing economic stimulus and providing for the environment with sustainable trails that help maintain the valuable watershed. Kim Delkener - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of this grant for the OHV trail work needed in this area to keep this public space safe and in good condition.Bob Garrow - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of this grant for the OHV trail work needed in this area to keep this public space safe and in good condition.Bob Garrow - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of this grant for adding trail to the existing system.Bob Garrow - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of this grant to help create the future planning on this system.Bob Garrow - 5/4/2020


I'm a mountain biker from Marin County where mountain biking is highly restricted despite being very popular. I love coming to the Downieville, Graegle and Quincy area because the mountain biking is excellent and we are welcomed. I really hope that more trail development happens because I think it would be fun to explore new areas. I think the "Lost Sierra" has a great opportunity to build upon the success of Downieville and become a major destination for the sport with a wider network. In general, I believe mountain bikers care about and want to experience a healthy natural environment while they engage in their sport and don't significantly degrade the trails if they are built well and maintained.Daniel Damien Filiatrault - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the San Diego Mountain Biking Association and the California Mountain Biking Coalition. These non-profits share the passion that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and have similar missions to improve and increase trail access on public lands in California. SDMBA would like to encourage the grant approval sought by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) for ground operations on the 80 miles of trails surrounding Downieville and CAL-Ida. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails, in turn, provide important local employment to a variety of businesses and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. They build sustainable trails that require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of utmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Respectfully, Susie Murphy Executive Director, San Diego Mountain Biking Association Secretary, California Mountain Biking CoalitionSusie A. Murphy - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the San Diego Mountain Biking Association and the California Mountain Biking Coalition. These non-profits share the passion that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and have similar missions to improve and increase trail access on public lands in California. SDMBA would like to encourage the grant approval sought by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) for ground operations on the 80 miles of trails surrounding Downieville and CAL-Ida. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails, in turn, provide important local employment to a variety of businesses and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. They build sustainable trails that require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of utmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Respectfully, Susie Murphy Executive Director, San Diego Mountain Biking Association Secretary, California Mountain Biking CoalitionSusie A. Murphy - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the San Diego Mountain Biking Association and the California Mountain Biking Coalition. These non-profits share the passion that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and have similar missions to improve and increase trail access on public lands in California. SDMBA would like to encourage the grant approval sought by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) for ground operations on the 80 miles of trails surrounding Downieville and CAL-Ida. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails, in turn, provide important local employment to a variety of businesses and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. They build sustainable trails that require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of utmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Respectfully, Susie Murphy Executive Director, San Diego Mountain Biking Association Secretary, California Mountain Biking CoalitionSusie A. Murphy - 5/4/2020


I am in full support of the work being done. They are invigorating life in to the California economy and culture in a beneficial, sustainable manner. Bryson Malone - 5/4/2020


I am in full support of the work being done. They are invigorating life in to the California economy and culture in a beneficial, sustainable manner. Bryson Malone - 5/4/2020


I'm writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and its trail building efforts. The SBTS provides invaluable support to local communities, creates economic opportunities, and helps protect the watershed. Matt Dambrov - 5/4/2020


I'm writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and its trail building efforts. The SBTS provides invaluable support to local communities, creates economic opportunities, and helps protect the watershed. Matt Dambrov - 5/4/2020


I'm writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and its trail building efforts. The SBTS provides invaluable support to local communities, creates economic opportunities, and helps protect the watershed. Matt Dambrov - 5/4/2020


I strongly support this grant, as it will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, generate local employment, creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, and keep trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Theodore Gilliland - 5/4/2020


I strongly support this grant, as it will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, generate local employment, creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, and keep trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Theodore Gilliland - 5/4/2020


I strongly support this grant, as it will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, generate local employment, creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, and keep trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Theodore Gilliland - 5/4/2020


Plumas County is doing a great job creating recreation opportunities for the community. Building and maintaining trails creates long term sustainable resource for locals and visitors. As a member of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, we are grateful Plumas County makes the investment of time and energy and I support this grant. Jesse Passafiume - 5/4/2020


This planning grant represents the beginning of an amazing new community asset. I applaud Plumas County for working to build trails for visitors and locals that add to the economic health of the county. As a member of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, I support this grant application. Jesse Passafiume - 5/4/2020


Plumas County does a great job investing in recreation infrastructure. As a member of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, I am grateful to have a partner that understands the long term positive economic impact of trails on a community. I support this grant. Jesse Passafiume - 5/4/2020


I think it's important to continue to develop trails systems for many reasons. We visit this area as a family every year to ride bikes on excellent trails. It's great to get the kids out to remote areas away from the urban sprawl where they can pedal for miles without seeing any buildings. New trails and maintaining existing trails is of high importance to me.Gabe Brown - 5/4/2020


I think it's important to continue to develop trails systems for many reasons. We visit this area as a family every year to ride bikes on excellent trails. It's great to get the kids out to remote areas away from the urban sprawl where they can pedal for miles without seeing any buildings. New trails and maintaining existing trails is of high importance to me. Connecting camp sites has very exciting potential.Gabe Brown - 5/4/2020


I think it's important to continue to develop trails systems for many reasons. We visit this area as a family every year to ride bikes on excellent trails. It's great to get the kids out to remote areas away from the urban sprawl where they can pedal for miles without seeing any buildings. New trails and maintaining existing trails is of high importance to me.Gabe Brown - 5/4/2020


I support the grant application by the Plumas County Sheriff's office for patrol funding, equipment and supplies. I am active in working with federal, state and local public land managers, as well as private landholders such as Sierra Pacific Industries, and non-profit organizations such as the Hill Sliders (snowmobile group) and Friends of the High Lakes (OHV, OSV and single track). I meet monthly with the Forest Advisory Committee for Butte County, where we have received public comment and feedback on grant applications such as this. There certainly has been an increase in outdoor activities utilizing off-road vehicles on county roads, private roads and in the national forest lands. Along with that has come safety concerns for operators, abusive riders causing resource damage, and increased search and rescue activity, particularly in snowy conditions. I believe it is imperative for law enforcement to step-up patrolling in order to help manage recreational activity related to OHV use, particularly on the weekends and holidays where there is an influx of users. Plumas County's Sheriff's Office patrols areas frequented by citizens of Butte County, such as the Bucks Lake area and the High Lakes. High usage requires law enforcement presence to mitigate harmful activity and also serve as a resource in the event of accidents or need for information/education. Peggy Moak - 3/31/2020


Strong support. I travel these backcountry areas and have seen major increase of visitors and more damage and violation in the last 5 years.Scott Connelly - 4/21/2020


Strong support. I travel these areas and see much damage and violations. More enforcement/education neededScott Connelly - 4/21/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


Thanks to the OHV grant last year there has been significant progress in maintaining OHV regulations and laws. Morongo Valley Neighborhood Watch respectfully requests that this grant be awarded in order to sustain the current progress and make sure that future illegal OHV activities are avoided. Susan Lefevre - 3/11/2020


Continued grant funding will enable us to maintain our successful community relationship with the Morongo station OHV team and to secure gains made over the past year. Because of funding provided through this grant; we were able to meet with Sgt. Hanke numerous times throughout this past year to target OHV problem areas in Morongo Valley. We are grateful for the concentrated support we have received from the Morongo Basin Sheriff's OHV team and ask that funding continue in order to maintain recent progress. Sharon Dove - 3/13/2020


Link to Comment Letter P. Brady - 5/4/2020


I would like to comment on the San Diego Sheriff's grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. While most of the application seems fine, the hourly rates are way too high. I looked at the San Diego Police application and for a sergeant with overtime pay is $100 per hour. How you get $172 per hour is a mystery to me. Sergeants from both agencies live in the same region, so there is no cost of living difference. The deputies rates have a similar discrepency. Otherwise, the application looks good to me.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


Seems as though the polluters have been deemed to be OHV users even though there is overwhelming documentation to point at the homeless, drug users, and thieves that inhabit this sensitive fishery. If the Santa Barbara County Sheriffs office were serious about the environment, then an effort to eliminate pollution from those that cause major damage would be planned funded. This is nothing more than a revenue enhancement scheme aimed at the havesLarry Matulis - 3/3/2020


Dear California State Parks Officials, As a lifelong resident of Santa Barbara County, I am skeptical of the ability of the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office to responsibly utilize these grant funds. I believe this law enforcement grant would be better spent by other agencies for the following reasons: The SBSO has a recent track record of overspending on projects that use inadequate contractors and lack little if any oversight. They contracted with Rosser International, a Georgia-based engineering firm that abruptly shut down in July 2019 after only partially completing work on a new jail facility in northern Santa Barbara County. The North County Jail was originally supposed to open in 2018 and cost an estimated $77 million but the total project so far has cost $111 million and the SBSO announced a tentative opening time of May 2020. However, the SBSO has still not arranged contractors to provide food and medical services. The SBSO is the subject of numerous grand jury reports and lawsuits in the past 30 years, mainly related to its operation of the Main Jail in Santa Barbara. Smuggling of contraband into the facility is a recurring problem due to a lack of training and equipment. In August 2019, 18 inmates were hospitalized in one day for a mass overdose on opiates. The SBSO received about $80 million in state grants for the North County Jail yet the Grand Jury has repeatedly requested basic improvements to the current Main Jail like X-ray scanners to find smuggled weapons and cellphones and search dogs trained to find drugs. On Feb. 21 this year, two SBSO deputies working in the facility were arrested on multiple felony sexual assault charges after a two-year internal investigation. The slow response to these serious charges is unacceptable and, along with pending DUI and excessive force charges on other deputies, reflects a general culture of lax oversight. As a grant writer who has written detailed applications to federal and state agencies and an active hiker and fisherman, I find the SBSO's description of the problem they face to be laughable. I don't understand how steelhead trout in a large river are seriously threatened by offroad vehicles on land. The application also stated that SBSO deputies found a gill net in the river, yet I have never heard of or seen any illegal netting in this area in the last 20 years. Abandoned vehicles, bonfires, and drinking are more prevalent in other wilderness areas and many local hiking trails and portions of the Los Padres National Forest are littered with broken glass, beer cans, and charred wood. People have also graffitied on Native American cave paintings that are more than 1000 years old. All of these problems exist in other areas of SBSO jurisdiction and their prevalence shows the lack of ability and avoidance of foot patrols and getting out of cars among the SBSO. Mountain bikes or foot patrols would be better-suited to patrolling the area than ATV's, which are loud and would alert anyone nearby. Bike and foot patrols of creeks and wooded areas by other agencies near the city of Santa Barbara prevent illegal camping, fires, dumping, and environmental destruction. The SBSO only has an initial fitness test and there are no ongoing requirements or incentives compelling SBSO deputies to stay physically fit. Although measuring the Body Mass Index of applicants is beyond the scope and abilities of this grant program, the results would probably help explain why SBSO deputies have not effectively patrolled rural and wilderness areas in the past. In conclusion, the public interest would be better served by allocating grant funding to other agencies or areas of the state. The SBSO has stagnant leadership and outdated law enforcement methods and is locally distinguished by its lack of professionalism and misappropriation of funding. I urge your grant-making agency to direct funds to where they are needed most instead of taking the exaggerations in this application at face value. Sincerely, Greg FischerGreg Fischer - 3/4/2020


 

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

**SUPPORT** CA Youth Programs are needed in OHV recreation, and with this tie in with State Partner NYPUM, I support this Grant Applicant and submission for funding. Thank you, David Pickett as Individual & past D36MCSC,Inc Legislative Action Office Director DAVID PICKETT - 3/7/2020


I would like to comment on the AADAP grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I love that this nonprofit is using NYPUM to help kids enjoy riding dirtbikes. I have personally volunteered with the NYPUM from El Centro and know that it is a great program for the kids. I do, however, have issues in a couple places. First, it seems like a lot of staff time, two full time and two half time to take kids riding two times a month. I know there is class time, but this still seems excessive. The riding gear line items seem fine, but there is a line item for $38,000 to rent a van. I looked at Enterprise rent a car and you can get a 15 passenger van for $128 per day. Multiply by 24 riding days you get a cost of a little over $3000. Then you don't have to register, maintain etc the van. You also mention taking the kids to Hungry Valley and Heber Dunes SVRA's. While Hungry Valley is a good choice, I question Heber Dunes. Heber is pretty far away and is almost entirely sand. Trying to learn to ride as a beginner in sand is for sure very difficult. When you drive from LA to Heber, you go right by Ocotillo Wells, which would be an excellent place to learn to ride (not in the summer). Might I suggest you look into going to San Gabrial Canyon? Although a small place, it is pretty close to LA and should be big enough for you. Contact Angeles National Forest to see if they can help you.Ed Stovin - 4/29/2020


I support and excited to hear that AADAP has applied for this Grant. The NYPUM program is a wonderful program but I have reservations about training at the Honda Rider Education Center. I understand that this is a good place to train but it is restrictive and is not always available. I recommend that training be held at Hungry Valley SVRA. This area is always open, has picnic tables and bathrooms. Frederika Keating - 5/4/2020


I would like to comment on Central Coast Trail Riders Association grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. This is a great example of how grant dollars should be spent. A lot of work directly on OHV trails for a relatively small amount of money. This grant should be funded as fully as possible to maintain opportunity in Los Padres National Forest.Ed Stovin - 5/1/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


I would like to comment on the Desert Group Search and Rescue Volunteer grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. This group provides vital services at a tiny fraction of the cost a government agency would charge. I love the emergency contact card item. There was a couple promoting a similar thing called Got Desert ID some years back. I don't think they are active anymore, so this is a great way to take their place. Good luck out there and I hope I never need your services.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I support this grant for monitoring. I helped clear invasive weeds at the DTRNA lands and saw a number of OHV incursions; in some cases, fence was pulled down or damaged to allow illegal entry. They need this grant for monitoring and repair! Barbara Bane - 3/24/2020


please help the tortoise from becoming extinctrichard b perkowski - 4/25/2020


Please see linked piblic comment document. Ed Larue - 4/27/2020


DESERT TORTOISE COUNCIL 4654 East Avenue S #257B Palmdale, California 93552 www.deserttortoise.org eac@deserttortoise.org via California State Parks comment portal and email April 25, 2020 Sixto J. Fernandez, Grants Manager Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program California State Parks, Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division 1725 23rd Street, Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95816 Sixto.Fernandez@parks.ca.gov RE: Letter of Support for the Preliminary Grant Application by the Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee for Monitoring and Restoration of Areas Adjacent to Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area Dear Mr. Fernandez: The Desert Tortoise Council (Council) is a non-profit organization comprised of hundreds of professionals and laypersons who share a common concern for wild desert tortoises and a commitment to advancing the public’s understanding of these species. Established in 1975 to promote conservation of tortoise species in the deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico, the Council routinely provides information to individuals, organizations, and regulatory agencies on matters potentially affecting desert tortoises within their geographic ranges. This is a Letter of Support to fund the Preliminary Grant Application submitted by the Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee, Inc. (DTPC) for Monitoring and Restoration of Areas Adjacent to the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTRNA). Funding this request would enable the DTPC to monitor (including photo-monitoring) conservation lands to assess restoration progress, install new/replace damaged educational signs, install directional trail signs to direct off-highway vehicle (OHV) use to appropriate routes, implement trail camouflage in areas of high OHV incursions, repair fences, and remove invasive plant species identified during monitoring. These restoration, monitoring, education, and surveillance measures would occur on approximately 4,600 acres of conservation lands that the DTPC owns and manages directly adjacent to the DTRNA. These measures would help prevent future unauthorized OHV activities that result in long-term damage to desert environments and public resources including the federal and State-threatened Agassiz’s desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) (synonymous with “Mojave desert tortoise”) and its habitat. Below are the reasons we strongly request that you fund this grant application: 1. The Preliminary Grant Application for Monitoring and Restoration of Areas Adjacent to DTRNA describes a project methodology that enables the DTPC to quantify their actions and accomplishments. It includes the submittal of detailed reports documenting the actions taken (e.g., quantity of fencing, signs installed/replaced, quantity and locations of restoration activities using GIS applications, etc.) and compares those with previously collected/identified information specific to individual project areas, such as known areas of incursion or known areas of invasive species occurrence. This approach will provide the managers of the Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program with documentation of the success of past and current efforts. Thus, the managers will have information on whether the methods implemented by the DTPC are successful. This will help the managers determine the value of funding similar grant proposals in the future. 2. The DTPC has a history of accomplishing project goals and objectives with funds from grant sources. In the past, the DTPC has demonstrated that when awarded funds from the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation’s Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program, they spent those funds effectively and contributed to improving desert tortoise habitat, which benefits the tortoise and other species. 3. This project will accomplish its goals efficiently. It will prevent future damage to desert habitats and assist in the restoration of native flora. With the DTPC’s request of $126,179.60 for monitoring and restoring 4,600 acres, this is less than $28 an acre. Because the funds are for monitoring and restoration for two years, this is $14 per acre per year. We also appreciate that the DTPC is providing $20,815.00 of its own funds, which signifies their commitment to the work and their belief in its intrinsic value. 4. The subject properties in areas adjacent to the DTRNA are part of an Area of Critical Environmental Concern/Tortoise Conservation Area and the Fremont-Kramer Critical Habitat Unit for the Mojave desert tortoise. Thus, restoration activities are important for the tortoise and essential habitats as they will occur in areas designated for the long-term conservation of the federally and state-threatened tortoise, designated critical habitat. Other species that will directly benefit include the state-threatened Mohave ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus mohavensis) and special status species including western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) and American badger (Taxidea taxus), among others. 5. Implementation of the restoration activities in the DTPC’s Preliminary Grant Application is important to the long-term management and conservation of the DTRNA. This is because the lands to be restored and monitored with monies from this grant application are immediately adjacent to the DTRNA. This area links the DTRNA to other lands with a conservation management designation for federally and state-threatened species and special status species. 6. Management by the DTPC within and adjacent to the DTRNA has yielded positive results for the Mojave desert tortoise (Berry et al 2014). This small but well managed area within the Fremont-Kramer Critical Habitat Unit is the only stratum in California with stable-to-increasing tortoise populations for the past decade (Allison 2017, Allison and McLuckie 2018). The past funding of DTPC projects by the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation’s Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program has contributed to this management success. For these reasons, we believe that the Preliminary Grant Application by the Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee for Monitoring and Restoration of Areas Adjacent to Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area should be fully funded. Regards, Edward L. LaRue, Jr., M.S. Desert Tortoise Council, Ecosystems Advisory Committee, Chairperson cc: Desert Tortoise Preserve Committee, Inc. dtpc@pacbell.net Allison, L. J. and A. M. McCluckie. 2018. Population trends in Mojave desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). HerpConBio 13(2): 433-452. Allison, L. J. 2017. Range-wide monitoring of the Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii): 2017 annual reporting. US Fish and Wildlife Service, DTRO, Reno Nevada. 39 pp. Berry, K.H., L.M. Lyren, J.L. Yee, and T.Y. Bailey. 2014. Protection benefits desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) abundance: The influence of three management strategies on a threatened species. Herpetological Monographs, 28(1):66-92. 2014. Ed LaRue - 4/28/2020


I support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center and all it does for the public. I also support ESAC receiving a grant to reach a broader audience. Neil Satterfield - 3/11/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a necessary resource in our region and without it could compromise the safety of the public especially those who use public recreational areas. Daniel Ranson - 3/12/2020


I have been using the esac information and data since they have begun. I find it to be an essential for my safety and the people I am with. Their website follows professional protocols and the forecasters are extremely qualified. The information provided by them has kept me making smart decisions and plays such an important role to the community. They cover a large mountain range, something which is impossible for just me to gather data. I am thankful we have this opportunity to reference data, as these decisions play an important role to all us backcountry explorers. I fully support this entity and hope there will be many more years to come. Thank you, Brett Lotz - 3/12/2020


I strongly support this grant application by ESAC and their goal of expanding already successful organization to insure the safety of the OHV community. ESAC has a proven track record in providing accurate and useful avalanche education and information for winter back country travelers of the Eastern Sierra. As a OHV user and frequent back country traveler, I feel this project is greatly needed in the Eastern Sierra. We have a large and growing OHV community and this resource for avalanche education and safety information will undoubtedly save lives and help to keep OHV users safe in avalanche terrain. ESAC's excellent reputation and background working directly with land managers and decision makers in the communities of the Eastern Sierra make them an ideal orginization to launch this OHV specific program. This grant project would be an excellent investment of OHV funds and would create an avalanche safety infrastructure that will benefit the OHV community long after the grant funds are exhausted. Thank you for your consideration of the ESAC application. Brian Robinette - 3/14/2020


I and many others frequently use the ESAC website for information on current avalanche conditions. ESAC is our only resource to help make safe riding discussion in our area. I would like to see ESAC get funding from the OHV fund to further their work and to help us to continue to recreate safely. John Graves Snowmobiler John Graves - 3/21/2020


As a residence of Mono County for the previous 18 years and backcountry enthusiastic , I depend on ESAC to determine the my own safety so does my riding group. In order to stay safe and return to my family after every ride I currently have to seek for education in different county’s or even states. It would be great to see ESAC get funding from the OHV fund to further their work and to help us to continue to recreate safely. Lucas Ropke Backcountry snowmobiler Enthusiastic Lucas Ropke - 3/22/2020


I am a resident of Mammoth Lakes and a winter backcountry traveler. I use the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's (ESAC) winter avalanche advisory regularly. It is a crucial first step in my winter recreation. As mentioned in the grant application, motorized winter use is growing quickly. I have witnessed this over the years. Awareness of the avalanche risk (and managing it) are a part of the culture of backcountry skiing and snowboarding. This awareness and management saves lives. It does not seem to be as much a part of the culture among winter OHV users. I think that additional resources to allow ESAC to reach out to OHV users with marketing and advertising, and with free OHV-specific resources at the ESAC website, could save lives in the OHV community. Ian McEleney - 3/24/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


As an avid backcountry snowboarder and snowmobile user I rely on the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center for providing me with the information I need to make educated decisions while recreating in the backcountry. Through their clinics and awareness programs my knowledge of the snowpack has greatly increased, it'd be great if they had the tools to offer more of these programs so a greater percentage of backcountry travelers could benefit. Gabe Taylor - 4/15/2020


To Whom it May Concern- I am writing in support of funding the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center (ESAC). ESAC is a valuable public resource for an ever growing population that includes backcountry skiers and snowboarders and snow mobiles users. The advisories and forecasts helps backcountry travelers make educated decisions. In addition, the many educational opportunities ESAC provides to the public help the new and experienced stay informed as snow science and rescue tools and techniques evolve. Assisting these user groups stay informed of ever changing snow conditions requires resources. This grant will help fund this important public service. Respectfully- Jim BarnesJim Barnes - 4/15/2020


I enthusiastically support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's grant application. They provide an essential service for both motorized and non motorized over snow travelers here in the Eastern Sierra. The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center forecasts avalanche danger over a very large area with very limited resources. This grant would go a long way to support their activities. Scott Scott Weaver - 4/16/2020


Good Morning, I am writing to express my support of the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center and their application for the grant supporting the ESAC OHV Avalanche Advisory, Awareness and Outreach Project. I work as an avalanche educator providing introductory and intermediate level avalanche safety courses for recreational backcountry users and aspiring professionals. These courses are offered through a local small business in the Eastern Sierra. Regionally we have seen an increase in winter backcountry use in avalanche terrain in recent years which is in line with national trends. While fatality trends have been more flat for the past couple of years as a whole, the number of motorized users involved in fatal avalanche accidents is still quite high nationally. The business which I work for primarily serves mountaineers, backcountry skiers and backcountry snowboarders, which is consistent with avalanche education course providers across the American West. The OHV/Snowmobile community is notably absent locally from avalanche education opportunities. As a professional avalanche worker I commend the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center in their efforts to more actively engage this under-served user group. In what I have observed in my 10 years as a local resident, the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a community leader in avalanche safety and information. Their volunteer board of directors is talented, but somewhat limited in expanding the program deliverables due to relatively small fundraising efforts. Funds made available through the CA State Parks OHV Grant will support the center in reaching the community as a whole and allow them to more specifically support the OHV user group with their unique use of avalanche terrain and avalanche safety needs. Thank you for your time and support in making our public lands safer and more accessible for everyone.Mike Phillips - 4/16/2020


The ESAC organization provides an exceptionally valuable resource for the individuals recreating in the eastern sierra. Motorized travel on snow presents a complex situation where mechanical stresses are applied to the snowpack in a very unique way. Many users never consider that they may trigger and die in avalanche due to the forces they impart on the snowpack. In the event an avalanche is triggered the rescue process must be strategic and methodically to increase the chance of victim survival. This takes training from experts, self study, and practice. The ESAC team is a key component of the education. The ESAC team is challenged with educating users and monitoring a vast area of the eastern sierra to mitigate risk for users. This is a needed and expensive undertaking and each year they are financially challenged to reach their full potential and visions of education due to the lack of funding. The employees and the ESAC board are passionate about education for all back country users and strive to provide thorough and up to date information about rescue techniques, snow safety evaluation, and the current snow pack. Inyo and Mono County are low on full time residents, which is likely why funding is so challenging for this organization. Despite small local populations thousands of people from around the region and world travel to this area to recreate and utilize ESAC as a resource when traveling over snow in the mountains. This creates an unbalanced dynamic of high volume of users and low volume of support. Inyo and Mono County's have earned and deserve as much funding as possible to maintain the safety of the backcountry users. Allowing ESAC to involve more with local motorized users will save lives and reduce the chance of irrational and unsafe behavior putting less stress on our small local hospitals, SAR teams, and families of those recreating. Thank you for considering this excellent organization for a grant. Jess Douglas Jess Douglas - 4/17/2020


Hello, I am an avid Snowmobiler, Skier, and winter sports enthusiast here in the Eastern Sierras. ESAC has been a crucial tool for me to help make decisions about backcountry travel in the area. Whether I am skiing or using my snowmobile as backcountry access to ski; I rely on the information that ESAC gives me to make important decisions. I am grateful to have such a wealth of knowledge about backcountry access and conditions that the ESAC providesSean Logan - 4/17/2020


My name is Steve Wetherwax. I live in Mammoth Lakes. I am an avid snowmobiler. I ride mostly big back country stuff. Before heading out I always check the current conditions on the eastern sierra avalanche center. I think it's an important tool for keeping me and my friends safe while snowmobiling. If the avalanche forecast isn't safe we make other plans. Thanks Steve Weatherwax - 4/17/2020


Hi my name Sean Patrick and I use the esac before I go into the back country and it is extremely helpful to all of use snowmobiler. I check the sight daily when it is snowing for avalanche forecasts.Sean Patrick - 4/17/2020


My name is Stephen Schau, I snowmobile 3-5 times a week and before I go to a new zone I always check the ESAC website for avalanche information.Steve Schau - 4/17/2020


Snowmobiling in the backcountry has the same potential avalanche hazards as backcountry skiing. It’s important to know what is happening with the snowpack and snow stability before heading into the mountains. It’s also important to take the same safety measures with you, beacon, shovel, probe and an airbag. Avalanche forecasts are an important piece of information before going backcountry skiing. It is good to listen to what the experts have to say that are making field observations and use that information with your own observations while traveling in the mountains. I check the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's forecasts anytime I'm thinking of heading out into the backcountry. Christian Pondella - 4/17/2020


The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a critical resource for winter recreation in the region providing education and timely, accurate information to help backcountry users make informed decisions. I strongly support their application to receive funding through the California State Parks OHV program. ESAC's outreach programs and events build a community of users and promote education and safety in winter recreation. Their forecasters work tirelessly to assess snow conditions and distill data into informative reports that cover hundreds of miles along the eastern slopes of the range. By providing ESAC with a significant source of reliable funding, the OHV grant would ensure that a variety of winter recreation users, both residents and visitors, can have access to the information and awareness necessary for safe, fun excursions in the Sierra. More and more people are exploring backcountry skiing, snowboarding, and other sports each year. As interest grows, ESAC's programs and advisories are an essential part of encouraging safe, responsible, sustainable recreation in the region. Thank you for considering ESAC for an OHV program grant. Laura Beardsley - 4/26/2020


To Whom It May Concern, I am writing in support of awarding grant money to the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center. They are an essential organization for a large swath of winter backcountry users from San Diego to Tahoe, and everywhere in between. They have worked wonders with a limited supply of funds from local sponsors and individual charitable contributions to release daily updates on snow conditions in the Sierra, and I know would put this grant to excellent use. Dollars spent on ESAC literally translates to lives saved in the backcountry. I know I owe my life to them many times over. Sincerely, Ben Broer Recreational Backcountry User Benjamin Broer - 4/30/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides an invaluable service to our local community. Their efforts help to ensure that backcountry users, both human-powered and motorized, have access to current avalanche conditions and alerts, so that they can recreate safely and responsibly. Matthew McClain - 4/30/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides an invaluable service to our local community. Their effort help to ensure that backcountry users, both human-powered and motorized, have access to current avalanche conditions and alerts, so that they can recreate safely and responsibly. Matthew McClain - 4/30/2020


Please support the ESAC! Thank you for your time. Brittany Barden - 4/30/2020


The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides an essential service to thousands of local residents and visitors alike. Their ability to conduct comprehensive snow science and draw timely forecasts each day from it reduces the risk of recreating in the backcountry significantly. Funding ESAC also provides a huge economic boost to other industries, including gear stores, lodging, dining, and others. Without ESAC, some people will still go into the backcountry, yet they will go with little comprehensive information of the snowpack and with much greater risk to themselves and others. As a California resident and tax payer, I fully support this grant funding the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center.Ben Kahn - 4/30/2020


The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides an essential service to thousands of local residents and visitors alike. Their ability to conduct comprehensive snow science and draw timely forecasts each day from it reduces the risk of recreating in the backcountry significantly. Funding ESAC also provides a huge economic boost to other industries, including gear stores, lodging, dining, and others. Without ESAC, some people will still go into the backcountry, yet they will go with little comprehensive information of the snowpack and with much greater risk to themselves and others. As a California resident and tax payer, I fully support this grant funding the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center.Ben Kahn - 4/30/2020


ESAC is a valuable resource to the California outdoors community. Their avalanche advisories are quite literally lifesaving for many of us who venture into the Sierra Nevada mountains in the winter. Please provide this grant to ESACEsmaeel Paryavi - 4/30/2020


The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a vital resource to backcountry enthusiasts, SAR teams, and all others traveling into and/or around avalanche-prone terrain. They work tirelessly to maintain the safety of thousands each year. PLEASE SUPPORT THEM! David David Yasbek - 4/30/2020


I support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center and this grant.David Brownschidle - 4/30/2020


Please support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's (ESAC) grant request. ESAC provides a unique and invaluable safety service to the community. Their work keeps people safe, saving life and limb and reducing stress on the health care system. ESAC's work also nurtures a culture of continuous learning, which is essential to create a safety culture in the backcountry. People will go into the backcountry. It's good for their health, it's good for the environment, and this activity supports local economies across the Sierra Nevada. It's also fun! Because people will continue to participate in this positive activity, they need to be as safe as possible, and ESAC is essential to realizing that. That is why they need your support. Thank you.Noah Budnick - 4/30/2020


ESAC is a tremendous asset to the Eastern Sierra Community - their reporting keeps people informed and safe while recreating. Expanding this service to the OHV community will serve a vital need within our community. Sean Galaway - 4/30/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides an essential service and I reference their website every time I go skiing in the backcountry. Backcountry skiing and snowboarding is becoming increasingly popular. In 2015 I only had 3 friends doing backcountry activities. Now that number is at least ten. The website and advisory are essential sources of information for us. We base a lot of our decisions based on how safe (or unsafe) the snow pack appears. Brian Wallace - 4/30/2020


This program needs funding in order to save tons of lives of backcountry recreationalists. Would love to continue using this resource Melissa - 4/30/2020


I rely on forecasts and information from the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center to make safe and informed decisions when traveling in avalanche terrain during the winter time. The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides a vital public service that saves lives and is very deserving of public funding to support their operations.Graham Baskett - 4/30/2020


ESAC and our local community would benefit immensely from this grant!! Sydney knadler - 4/30/2020


ESAC and our local community would benefit so immensely from this grant! Sydney knadler - 4/30/2020


This grant would much help eastern sierra avalanche center, since a lot of backcountry users from all over the world come here to recreate.Marlon - 4/30/2020


I check ESAC website daily for avalanche safety reports. Their content is essential for the safety of the increasingly growing backcountry community in the Eastern Sierra and all those travelling to it (noteably from Southern Cal). Scott Jackson - 4/30/2020


I check ESAC website daily for avalanche safety reports. Their content is essential for the safety of the increasingly growing backcountry community in the Eastern Sierra and all those travelling to it (noteably from Southern Cal). Scott Jackson - 4/30/2020


I hope this project is awarded funding. The information this agency provides is incredibly important for public safety. Their educational outreach is also extremely helpful to not only the eastern sierra communities but also all Californians who enjoy recreating here. With the climate of the world being what it is, I think people's interest in exploring snow country will increase more than in the past as people try to distance themselves. Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's work and forecasting helps keep many Californians safe. Please help them help us all.Pamela Smitheman - 4/30/2020


Hello, I am writing in support of ESAC's grant application to develop an awareness and outreach project intended on connecting ESAC with OHV users in the Eastern Sierra. If there's anything we're learning in this time of crisis, it's that our communities are critically interdependent and that the safety of one is crucial to the safety of all. The more educated we can all be about the inherent risks of winter conditions in the Eastern Sierra, the safer we can all be. I am grateful for ESAC's commitment to providing that critical knowledge, and believe that this grant will enhance the safety of our broader community by expanding the scope of their work to those they haven't been able to reach yet. Thank you, Sam Webster Sam Webster - 4/30/2020


ESAC is a vital member of the Eastern Sierra community. They provide vital information to the public and should have the resources made available to them to support all types of backcountry travelers. Michael Moranz - 4/30/2020


I am writing as a lifelong resident of California in support of Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center (ESAC) and their grant application. ESAC is the first line of defense for thousands of Californians to safely travel in our backcountry each year. The service is essential and invaluable. Andrew Fischer - 4/30/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center is a vital safety and education for any backcountry users in the Eastern Sierra. I check their website almost daily throughout the ski season and they're the first place I look to for a report if I hear of any significant avalanche in the area.Alex Teitelbaum - 4/30/2020


Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center provides essential services to the outdoor community. Please help support their efforts to keep us safe in the backcountry.Rachelle Boyd - 4/30/2020


ESAC does so much to enhance the experience of outdoor travel, education, and recreation in the Sierra. I look forward to a long and prosperous future for ESAC so that they can continue to build and expand upon their already stellar effort.Sean Quinn - 4/30/2020


ESAC does so much to enhance the experience of outdoor travel, education, and recreation in the Sierra. I look forward to a long and prosperous future for ESAC so that they can continue to build and expand upon their already stellar effort.Sean Quinn - 4/30/2020


I want to begin by noting that the work done by the Easter Sierra Avalanche Center not only serves residents of Inyo and Mono counties, but also backcountry users from across the state who flock to the region during winter. As such, ESAC offers a vital and important service to the public, the value of which should not be understated. Outreach to OHV users is integral to the mission of ESAC, promotes safety for all individuals in the backcountry, and is a net benefit to winter recreation in the region. As a resident of Placer County, I have seen the important synergy that exists between backcountry skiers and snowboarders and OHV users under the umbrella of the Sierra Avalanche Center (our local forecasting non-profit). The result has been increased safety and awareness in the backcountry, leading to fewer accidents, burials, and search and rescue operations. This is a benefit for everyone traveling in the backcountry, but it has only been made possible via outreach and communication between SAC and OHV users. I urge the California State Parks to extend a grant to the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, so that the Sierra can be united--from Truckee to Whitney--in its ability to offer reliable avalanche advisories, support, and reporting for all backcountry users, whether on skis or a sled. All the best, Katy Hover-Smoot Professor, Sierra College & Cerro Coso College Katy Hover-Smoot - 4/30/2020


This service is saving thousands of lives a day! Sayer - 4/30/2020


Writing in support of eastern Sierra avalanche center thanks. Jessica Johnson - 4/30/2020


pls support these guys. they are saving lives jared stanley - 4/30/2020


Hello and thank you for the opportunity to comment on this grant application. The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center(ESAC) provides a critical services to backcountry users across a large forecasting area. Both motorized and non-motorized users benefit from the daily forecasts produced by ESAC. I work as a guide and avalanche course instructor based in Mammoth Lakes, CA. We work primarily with human powered backcountry travelers, but occasionally have mechanized users in our Level 1 and Level 2 Avalanche Courses. It is not that the courses don't address the fundamental concern of avoiding avalanches for the mechanized user, but more we are not as fluent with the mode of travel and how much terrain the machines can cover on a given day. The closest avalanche education resource for mechanized users I am aware of is hours drive away, which does not fill the needs of our local community This is where I think the ESAC can be a resource to the motorized users by helping them understand the risk of avalanches through outreach, education and advisories. The ESAC is a privately funded avalanche center and relies on donations from concerned users as well as money from grant opportunities like this one. Please consider the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center to receive a grant for this important work with motorized users in winter. Thank you, Geoff Unger American Mountain Guide/IFMGA Mountain Guide Geoff Unger - 4/30/2020


I am a resident of southern California and I frequently visit the eastern sierras for year round outdoor recreation such as camping,backpacking, hiking, and winter activities like snowshoeing and snow travel. In the winter and spring seasons I use ESACs invaluable resources for the latest up to date info on backcountry conditions to help me before I head into the backcountry. Organizations such as ESAC are a great help to the public and could put the grant money to good use in continuing their avalanche forecast work. Kristen Combs - 4/30/2020


I am a resident of Southern California, and I frequently visit the Eastern Sierras for year round recreation such as camping, hiking, backpacking, and winter activities like snowshoeing and snow travel. I use the ESACs invaluable resources to hel me safely decide when and where is best to travel in the winter months up there. Without organization's like them it would make things much more difficult for those of us who venture into the backcountry in the winter months. The grant money would be put to great use with this center! Kristen Combs - 4/30/2020


I am all in for supporting the ESAC! They keep our community of backcountry skiers and snowboarders alive in the backcountry, and allow us to safely explore our incredible Sierra Nevada mountains. Please ensure that they get the funding they need to keep doing their fantastic work! Pete Stone - 4/30/2020


pleaseAdam Kunis - 4/30/2020


Law enforcement is an important element in respecting OHV access and thereby protecting OHV access. The INF enforcement unit has been very supportive of the OHV community. Please approve this grant.mike johnston - 5/1/2020


I support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's program to educate outdoor enthusiasts.Ethan Ayer - 5/1/2020


I support the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center's program to educate outdoor enthusiasts.Ethan Ayer - 5/1/2020


This will provide critical support to the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center that enables safe use of our state's lands. Matthew Varon - 5/1/2020


I am an avid snowmobiler and split boarder. I use ESAC’s website for information and education daily in the winter months. I am teaching my twelve year old son how to snowmobile and split board and about avalanche conditions. I highly support ESAC’s grant application. They are a great asset to our community. Damon Conover - 5/2/2020


The Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center (ESAC) provides an invaluable service to people who recreate in the eastern sierras during times when there is a potential for avalanches, and I strongly support their grant application. The services they provide in terms of education and awareness, winter avalanche advisories, and public outreach are a vitally important resource for people who recreate in the eastern sierras and enables them to do so safely. The importance of ESAC is important given the growing popularity of backcountry skiing. This is particularly true in light of the COVID-19 pandemic where increasing numbers of people are venturing into the backcountry to ski because of resort closures and individuals' desire to socially distance. It is important to note that by providing important safety information to people who recreate in the mountains during times of possible avalanche danger, the service ESAC provides significantly reduces the likelihood that other critical community resources (such as search and rescue, emergency medial responders and hospitalization) will be required. It is therefore a very good investment of public resources to support organizations such as ESAC that enable people to make well-informed decisions, reduce their risk, and minimize the impact on other public resources that arise from avalanche related accidents. The ESAC provides a very important service for the community. I am hopeful that their grant application will be approved, which will help ensure they are able to fulfill their mission. Thank you for your time and consideration. Jeffery Gross - 5/4/2020


This grant should be funded. Providing support and outreach to winter OHV activities by the ESAC will significantly improve the safety and enjoyment of this recreational opportunity. John Shepherd - 5/4/2020


I would like to comment on the Friends of El Mirage grant application on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I would like to thank FoEM for continuing to support the BLM and this much loved area and thank Randy for taking over. I see you spending $80,000 on week control. Are these invasive weeds? Are you using poison to get rid of them? I would like to understand the value of this activity. I was also wondering about all the work you do to fill cracks, then I realized it is for visitor safety. I would like to apply for your position Trail Route Monitor, can I work on weekends? I see 6,000 tons of BLM specified natural aggregate Cal Trans Class II Base Material for green sticker routes. What routes are this for? I thought we off-roaders like challenging routes. Seems like a awful lot of material. I see 90 days of motor grader and 60 days of water truck. Both seem like a lot. Do you water dirt roads on busy weekends for dust control? It seems to me that the number of days with the grader and water truck should match, plus the water truck should have extra days for dust control. The paper and digital maps will be a great resoursefor people who want to explore the area. I hope these grants can be funded as fully as possible to support this great area. Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I would like to comment on the Friends of Jawbone grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed these applications and find them all to be very large, but also reasonable. Because of the passing of the Dingle Act and completion of WEMO, updating these maps is great. I have used a few of these these maps with success. With the maps, I would appreciate if difficulty of routes could somehow be incorporated. I led some friends near Big Bear a few years ago using my CTUC digital map and went through the John Bull trail. It looked like the other trails nearby on my phone, but this is a black diamond route and one of my friends hasn't spoken to me since. Thanks for taking this on Randy and we'll be in touch. Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I would like to comment on the Friends of Jawbone grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed these applications and find them all to be very large, but also reasonable. Because of the passing of the Dingle Act and completion of WEMO, updating these maps is great. I have used a few of these these maps with success. With the maps, I would appreciate if difficulty of routes could somehow be incorporated. I led some friends near Big Bear a few years ago using my CTUC digital map and went through the John Bull trail. It looked like the other trails nearby on my phone, but this is a black diamond route and one of my friends hasn't spoken to me since. Thanks for taking this on Randy and we'll be in touch. Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


To Whom It May Concern, I am a long time OHV rider and user of public lands that provide opportunities for OHV use. I enjoy riding motorcycles in the Mojave Desert and regularly ride in Red Rock Canyon State Park and around the El Paso Wilderness area. I have personally used the maps put out by the Friends of Jawbone since their first edition for the Jawbone area and find them very accurate and helpful. They are truly some of the best off-road maps available. In addition, I use their map apps and find them incredibly useful as well. I fully support the use of OHV trust fund monies for the requested uses of Friends of Jawbones. Sincerely, Tim Mathos Tim Mathos - 5/3/2020


To Whom It May Concern, I am a long time OHV rider and user of public lands that provide opportunities for OHV use. I enjoy riding motorcycles in the Mojave Desert and regularly ride in Red Rock Canyon State Park and around the El Paso Wilderness area. I have witnessed first hand the work performed by the Friends of Jawbone and greatly appreciate their efforts for the OHV community. They provide a true service and appropriate use of OHV monies. I fully support the use of OHV trust fund monies for the requested uses of Friends of Jawbones. Sincerely, Tim Mathos Tim Mathos - 5/3/2020


To Whom It May Concern, I am a long time OHV rider and user of public lands that provide opportunities for OHV use. I enjoy riding motorcycles in the Mojave Desert and regularly ride in Red Rock Canyon State Park and around the El Paso Wilderness area. I have witnessed first hand the work performed by the Friends of Jawbone and greatly appreciate their efforts for the OHV community. They provide a true service and appropriate use of OHV monies. I fully support the use of OHV trust fund monies for the requested uses of Friends of Jawbones. Sincerely, Tim MathosTim Mathos - 5/3/2020


Huntington lake Volunteer Fire Department does an excellent job of patrolling a large area of trails in the Huntington lake basin. This is a remote area with many summertime visitors. Huntington Lake Volunteers are the only EMS/Fire personnel in a very large area who can render immediate aid. They also help the U.S. Forest Service answer visitor questions and directions during busy summer weekends. This volunteer work requires special equipment - that is why I speak to support their request. Thanks Brad Driscoll - 3/27/2020


Huntington lake Volunteer Fire Department does an excellent job of patrolling a large area of trails in the Huntington lake basin. This is a remote area with many summertime visitors. Huntington Lake Volunteers are the only EMS/Fire personnel in a very large area who can render immediate aid. They also help the U.S. Forest Service answer visitor questions and directions during busy summer weekends. This volunteer work requires special equipment - that is why I speak to support their request. Thanks Brad Driscoll - 3/27/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


a fairly new organization, Lake Tahoe Snowmobilers are a very dedicated and energetic group. The orga has worked very hard to keep OSV in the region. Awarding this grant will help the Lake Tahoe Snowmobilers in education and awareness to users in the area. As with OHV, signage is key in decreasing user conflicts. All users of the backcountry should have avalanche safety equipment as well as navigation tools and know how to use all of it. Education and practice is essential.Teresa Wik - 4/14/2020


Dear Commission Members, This letter is in support of the Grant request submitted by the Lake Tahoe Snowmobilers. Their assistance in educating the growing number of over the snow OHV users on the Tahoe, Plumas and Eldorado National Forests is a true asset and worthy of your funding. Providing encouragement and guidance to recreate safely, responsibly and legally on our public lands is needed now more than ever. Here is a group stepping up to stand in the gap and make a difference that will have a positive long term benefit .The energy that they are bringing to the table makes theirs one of the highest value requests before you this cycle. Please approve this modest request. Regards, Steve Davis Steve Davis - 4/17/2020


As the president of Main Street Murals it has been my honor to witness how the community of Barstow and surrounding areas have embraced the educational opportunities offered at the Desert Discovery Center. Buses full of students come there and learn the wonders of our desert and how it is their place to make sure that it is protected for generations to come. Main Street Murals youth program has taken many groups of youth and their parents out into the desert to experience it first hand through camping, clean-up and exploration adventures. This grant would make these and other opportunities available to many more. KATHLEEN FIERRO - 3/13/2020


WOW FANTASTIC. I TOTALLY SUPPORT THIS GRANT. WHAT A WONDERFUL AND STRAIGHT FORWARD APPROACH TO EDUCATE THE CHILDREN AND PUBLIC ABOUT SAFETY AND ALL THAT GOES WITH RESPONSIBLE OFF ROAD ACTIVITIES. GIVING OPPORTUNITY FOR CHILDREN TO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES THEY MAY NOT HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO THESE THINGS OTHERWISE. THESE PROGRAMS ARE IMPORTANT. THANK YOU James Lynn - 3/17/2020


GREAT PEOPLE DOING A GREAT JOB.James Lynn - 3/17/2020


I would like to comment on the Post Wildfire Recovery Alliance grant applications on behalf of the California Off-Road Vehicle Association. I have reviewed the applications and find both to be very generous to the OHV community. I hope both can be funded as fully as possible and wish you the best of luck with your projects. I look foreward to your future projects and successes.Ed Stovin - 5/2/2020


I am a longtime recreational visitor to the Upper Lake District of the Mendocino National Forest and a cabin owner at Lake Pillsbury. I am very familiar with the area where the Mason Trail Connector project is located. The area is somewhat remote and difficult to access and is not accessible by a typical streetlegal dumptruck. I've reviewed PWORA's application to install a multiplate culvert at the location indicated and believe that the applicant has underestimated the cost to deliver materials to the site. PWORA's budget includes $4,000 for delivery of materials to the site using rented heavy equipment and an operator. Due to the location of the site and terrain it is likely to require many more trips than estimated using a smaller dump track vehicle or utility vehicle, particularly for heavy materials such as rip rap, concrete and the multiplates for the culvert. I suggest that the budget be adjusted by 100% to allow for additional operator time related to materials delivery using equipment that is appropriate for the size of the existing trail and location. The new budget would be $8,000 to cover the under estimated labor cost of delivery. Additionally, a tracked dump truck rental should be added to the budget at approximately $5,000 to cover rental cost. Thank you for your consideration. Dean Joyner, Pilsbury Cabin OwnerDean Joyner - 5/4/2020


endorsed jeremy cole - 3/24/2020


I was lucky enough to attend the level 1 avalanche training course put on this winter. I find the knowledge and daily forecasts put out by the center to be incredibly valuable for the Sierra community. The information for anyone venturing into the backcountry is critical. The ability to get educated on the risks associated with exposure to certain conditions and terrain is a huge opportunity the center provides the public who use and love our land. This service to the community is a big endeavor and we are very fortunate to have. Please continue to support their mission. Thank you for your consideration. Matthew D. Mingrone - 3/28/2020


I write to comment on the SAC grant proposal. As mentioned in the proposal, avalanche terrain is easily accessible with motorized OSVs. The need for an avalanche forecast and motorized educational training sessions are invaluable. Having gone through the Level 1, I can unequivocally say that the practical application of avalanche education about conditions and the tools (rather than mere book learning), cannot be over value. Without a formal approach applied practically, time is lost, and with time lost the risk to life increases. I whole heartedly endorse the SAC grant proposal! R. Behrens - 4/2/2020


Participated in this program last winter. Awesome and super informative program educating motorized riders to be safe in avalanche terrain and backcountry environments. Sam Caven - 4/2/2020


To whom it may concern, I took the Motorized Level 1 course in January 2020. Before taking the course I thought I may never venture into the back country again because 1. I'd be too scared and traumatized by the class content to continue 2. I'd be overloaded with academic information to the point that I'd not retaiin anything and not be able to use it in real life. After taking the Motorized 1 class I was very releaved to find that I'd been equiped with simple, methodical, and easy to access information. The skills I take with me keep myself and others more safe. The trend for backcountry use has been rapidly rising in recent history. This spring, more people than ever are venturing out because ski resorts are done. Having trained people out and about, human powered and motorized, is going to be more and more important as we move into the future. A trained person may be able to say something as simple as "Hey, lets wait until that group above us moves across to a safe spot, then we can continue on". Or, "I don't think this is a safe option, how do you all feel?" This can save lives. . If Motorized 11 class were offered in the future I'd be one of the first to sign up. I'm motoviated to become more knowlegable about the environment I choose to explore, how to manage the people I choose to be with and the people that happen to be out there. I'm super impressed with tthe three day Motorized 1 class. The instructors are top nothch pros. The content is straight forward. The premise of the Motorized 1 class is: Dont get in an avalanch in the first place, but if somebody does, know what to do. That is the right mindset. I cant stress the importance of the Motorized 1 and 11 classes. I hope there will be funding to help train responsible backcoiuntry users. Thank you, Brian Thom Brian Thom - 4/3/2020


I have then multiple avalanche level 1 and 2 courses. The SAC 3 day OHV course was by far the best and most informative course. The instructors were excellent(Duncan and Justin). They provided the information across a wide variety of experiences in a friendly and easy to understand way. The on-the-job training while snowmobiling in the backcountry was invaluable for witnessing real life avalanche risks. I would highly recommend this course to all backcountry users and I am definitely signing up for the Rescue and Level2 courses next season.Herb Cunitz - 4/2/2020


Hello, My name is Nicholas Kniveton and I am an avid backcountry snowmobiler. Last year, I took a Motorized Level 1 Avalanche Course from SAC. This year, I took a Motorized Rescue class. Both of the courses were invaluable, completely changing how I thought about avalanches, backcountry safety, and overall risk management. I have no doubt that the education these classes provided will result in a snowmobiler who would have otherwise been caught in an avalanche returning safely back to their family. There are very few grant requests that have such a direct and tangible impact on saving the lives of OHV users. I understand that there are many Avi courses out there but SAC's is the only one I know of in California that focuses on motorized users of the backcountry, who access terrain in a far different manner (faster travel, more terrain, etc) than skiers or snowshoers. Level 1 classes are typically very expensive, often costing more than $500, so the grant from the OHV is vital to ensuring this class is accessible to those who wouldn't normally be able to afford it. I strongly urge the OHV Grant Program to fully fund SAC’s request. Every single tool from SAC that I have used has been helpful and educational. I skim over the SAC advisory everyday of the winter, and read through it meticulously the morning of any snowmobiling trip. I cannot commend on all aspects of the grant as I am not familiar with all parts, but I can comment on a few specifics:??Motorized Avi classes: As a graduate of SAC’s level 1 and rescue classes, I have been looking to further my avalanche education. I understand SAC needs more funding to add a level 2 Avi class to their curriculum. A level 2 class provides backcountry users with critical skills to asses the snowpack and make educated decisions to ensure safety. The snowmobile community is in dire need of more education, as there are currently zero level 2 classes taught in California. Staffing: All of the instructors for the motorize courses were extremely helpful and helped further my avalanche education. The instructors were top notch; SAC is clearly recruiting the best educators. Professional observers: SAC depends on observations to make their advisories, and while many come from the public, SAC’s professionalisms observations provide me with valuable info that I know is reliable and accurate. Every time I am preparing to go snowmobiling in the backcountry, I look at recent observations, focusing on ones made by SAC’s OHV professional observer, which are extremely helpful in making a safe plan for my trip. Marketing and Advertising: I only found out about SAC’s educational outreach programs through their online advertisement through their social media outreach. This outreach is very helpful for recruiting new OHV users to participate in SAC’s safety programs. Nicholas Kniveton - 4/2/2020


I am an OHV user in the Lake Tahoe area and I heard about the Sierra Avalanche Center's classes through a relative. I signed up for one and was very impressed by the curriculum and caliber of teaching. I have encouraged my friends and social media contacts to sign up for future classes. If one graduate of their class is in a group of skiers or snowmobilers who don't have high avalanche awareness, they can influence others in that group to follow safe practices. The items they are requesting funding for, classes, materials, and equipment, seem like worthy expenditures. Marketing is also a very good idea to spread the word about their classes, especially on social media. Doug Kniveton - 4/3/2020


I am an avid snowmobiler and back-country user. The education with avalanche safety and back-country use that Sierra Avalanche Center provides is amazing. All the information, classes, and on the hill training is top notch and really dials in your skills to be safe. The numbers of winter back-country deaths are much lower in Lake Tahoe then the rest of the country where avalanche dander is a risk. Most of the that, i believe, is because of education hat is provided. Sierra avalanche center provides a lot of courses to teach us how to be more safe, Specifically for me, it teaches me how to read terrain and understand the risks involved with each slope so i do not get myself in a bad situation. More classes out of Sierra Avalanche Center would be really nice to have to increase the knowledge of the locals whom use the back-country daily. Hoping for Zero Deaths and Zero avalanche related injuries. Dimitri - 4/5/2020


April 10, 2020 To the Leadership overseeing the programs funded by California’s Green Sticker Program: My name is Erik Boone and I am a citizen of El Dorado Hills, CA. I am writing this letter on behalf of both myself, as well as other local citizens Chelsea Byrne, Ken Porter, and Tom D’Arcy whom I regular ride snowmobiles with. We are writing today to express our thanks and gratitude to the folks “on the ground” executing on the Green Sticker programs. Every day we see waste, fraud and abuse of our tax dollars and we have very little trust in government programs to actually benefit the folks they were meant to help. However, the Green Sticker program has proved to be an anomaly in government. Our collective experience with the 3-day OHV avalanche safety class with Travis Feist and the Sierra Avalanche Center was excellent. We learned a lot both in the field, at home and in the classroom. My hope is that funding for this program will continue and grow. This is an example of real-life learning that has the potential to save lives in the Sierra back-country. Another example of an excellent individual employee who is making a big difference and maximizing the safety margin for riders is Matthew Brownlee, the Trails Manager who works the Foresthill/China Wall system. Given Corona virus and treacherous storms, many would expect Matt to cease operations. Instead, he has shown true grit and determination and in my mind is one of the few folks to bring confidence back to government. Without his work, folks wouldn’t be able to access the back-country safely, social distancing ourselves from others while still maintaining some outdoor exercise and sanity! In these crazy times, it is so nice to see public figures like Matt Brownlee and Travis Feist providing true value to those of us who pay these publicly mandated fees. Thank You to Matt and Travis – we appreciate you! My hope is that you will in turn give Mr. Brownlee and Mr. Feist the thanks and freedom to do their job that they have rightfully earned. Best Regards, Erik Boone Ken Porter Tom D’Arcy Chelsea Byrne Erik Boone - 4/7/2020


As a Truckee resident and Nevada County Sheriff's SAR volunteer I believe SAC's classes and education is 100% needed for the safety of all back country enthuses. I personal took a Level 1 Avalanche class this past season. I can testify on the professionalism of the instructors and the organization (SAC) setting up the classes and communication regarding the details of class location and times. I have also personally attended a few avalanche awareness events where I'm shocked by the lack of knowledge by the attendees. These attendees are educated and at one event was given a beacon. Even with a Level 1 class behind my belt I appreciate and take advantage of the beacon training SAC continues to provide. SAC has saved more lives than can be counted. SAC is an outstanding and much needed organization for everyone involved with the back country. Nina Clifton - 4/8/2020


The OHV funds donated to SAC have been a blessing, so many winter OVH users are now educated and recreating safely. The SAC has been so helpful in providing information to my self and so many others over the years. They are willing to educate every and anyone that applies. We (OHV users) would all love a higher level of education to ride and stay safe. The SAC program is like no other, they are paving the way on OHV education. I really would like to encourage you to continue helping SAC with OHV funds. Thank you, John Graves John Graves - 4/9/2020


The Sierra Avalanche Center is a proven asset to all who recreate in the wintertime snow lands of the central Sierra. Over the snow OHV users are no exception. The training programs that they offer and the daily forecasting they provide continue to improve the odds of those who desire to safely venture out and return intact. The over the snow OHV community is hungry for the knowledge and skills available from the Sierra Avalanche Center. Please continue to fund this valuable program. Regards, Steve DavisSteve Davis - 4/17/2020


As an OSV user who enjoys recreation on accessible lands surrounded by dangerous avalanche terrain, the safety and education of my group is particularly important to me. Having the proper equipment in good working order and knowledge regarding avalanche safety is something that not enough people take seriously. The Motorized Avalanche Classes offered by Sierra Avalanche Center are the best, most thorough classes I have ever been involved in. The classes are of extremely high quality and are scaled to best meet the skill levels of the groups in attendance. The educators who present these workshops are tremendously skillful and have decades of experience in avalanche territory and safety measures, encompassing all aspects of snowmobiling in avalanche terrain and avalanche rescue. The curriculum design and presentations are delivered in a very professional manner while still maintaining an exciting level of engagement in both classroom lectures and field explorations. We are extremely fortunate to have such passionate and knowledgeable instructors to devote their time to educating others. The curriculum is scaffolded and structured around the “Daily Flow” to help riders become aware of the condition’s alerts, terrain alerts, weather and local avalanche advisory forecasts, group size and members, emergency plans, etc. These Motorized Avalanche Classes are extraordinary and so are the people who devote their time to spreading the knowledge and information. Tasha Thomas - 4/30/2020


Please keep this great website going. I look at the avy forecast every morning at 7am. Thank you!kim watt - 5/1/2020


Please keep this great website going. I look at the avy forecast every morning at 7am. Thank you!kim watt - 5/1/2020


I am a 64 year old longtime resident of South Lake Tahoe and a avid winter backcountry user - both motorized (snowmobile/snowbike) as well as non motorized (skiing/snowboarding). Traveling and recreating in avalanche terrain is a very, very risky undertaking, even with advanced knowledge and skills. Due to the increase in winter backcountry use by ALL user groups, including and specifically the motorized user group, it is imperative that Sierra Avalanche Center continue to provide Motorized Avalanche Safety Education to the public SAC training is second to none, providing a very professional, regimented, accredited and informational program to its students. My experience has shown that students who complete these safety courses in turn become "ambassadors" so to speak - - they actually educate other users, passing along the critical knowledge they have acquired by attending SAC's Motorized Avalanche Safety Courses. This has a win-win effect as these "ambassadors" are educating many other users that cannot get enrolled into these safety courses due to the high demand to attend - it is not unusual for these safety courses to immediately fill to capacity within the first hour after registration for the course opens online. I personally know several dozen people who have been waiting 2 - 3 years to get enrolled in these courses. It would be great is SAC could obtain more funding so that they could offer more safety courses each winter, therefore increasing the number of users who are professionally trained in Motorized Avalanche Safety. I implore you to approve SAC's funding request so that SAC can continue to provide these life saving educational coursed to the public. Thank you for your consideration, Dale CabralDale Cabral - 5/2/2020


I am a 64 year old longtime resident of South Lake Tahoe and a avid winter backcountry user - both motorized (snowmobile/snowbike) as well as non motorized (skiing/snowboarding). Traveling and recreating in avalanche terrain is a very, very risky undertaking, even with advanced knowledge and skills. Due to the increase in winter backcountry use by ALL user groups, including and specifically the motorized user group, it is imperative that Sierra Avalanche Center continue to provide Motorized Avalanche Safety Education to the public SAC training is second to none, providing a very professional, regimented, accredited and informational program to its students. My experience has shown that students who complete these safety courses in turn become "ambassadors" so to speak - - they actually educate other users, passing along the critical knowledge they have acquired by attending SAC's Motorized Avalanche Safety Courses. This has a win-win effect as these "ambassadors" are educating many other users that cannot get enrolled into these safety courses due to the high demand to attend - it is not unusual for these safety courses to immediately fill to capacity within the first hour after registration for the course opens online. I personally know several dozen people who have been waiting 2 - 3 years to get enrolled in these courses. It would be great is SAC could obtain more funding so that they could offer more safety courses each winter, therefore increasing the number of users who are professionally trained in Motorized Avalanche Safety. I implore you to approve SAC's funding request so that SAC can continue to provide these life saving educational coursed to the public. Thank you for your consideration, Dale CabralDale Cabral - 5/2/2020


I am a 64 year old lifelong resident of South Lake Tahoe and a avid winter backcountry user - both motorized (snowmobile/snowbike) as well as non motorized (skiing/snowboarding). Traveling and recreating in avalanche terrain is a very, very risky undertaking, even with advanced knowledge and skills. Due to the increase in winter backcountry use by ALL user groups, including and specifically the motorized user group, it is imperative that Sierra Avalanche Center continue to provide Motorized Avalanche Safety Education to the public SAC training is second to none, providing a very professional, regimented, accredited and informational program to its students. My experience has shown that students who complete these safety courses in turn become "ambassadors" so to speak - - they actually educate other users, passing along the critical knowledge they have acquired by attending SAC's Motorized Avalanche Safety Courses. This has a win-win effect as these "ambassadors" are educating many other users that cannot get enrolled into these safety courses due to the high demand to attend - it is not unusual for these safety courses to immediately fill to capacity within the first hour after registration for the course opens online. I personally know several dozen people who have been waiting 2 - 3 years to get enrolled in these courses. It would be great is SAC could obtain more funding so that they could offer more safety courses each winter, therefore increasing the number of users who are professionally trained in Motorized Avalanche Safety. I implore you to approve SAC's funding request so that SAC can continue to provide these life saving educational coursed to the public. Thank you for your consideration, Dale CabralDale Cabral - 5/2/2020


Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals Creates local employment Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed I’ve been going up to Downieville for almost 30 years and those are some of the best trails in the world to hike and ride on. Keeping the trails open and maintained is the best thing you could do for the town and people up there. Aaron Cochran - 3/31/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and my family. It is imperative to keep these trails open for the public to use. Not only do they provide for our outdoor recreation, but they also have a positive impact forAlso mention the economic importance of the trails, for two struggling California counties. Please consider these reasons: -Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals -Creates local employment -Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance -Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Martin Scheel The Scheel Family Martin Scheel - 4/1/2020


As a resident of Plumas county and a recreater in the Sierra Buttes/ Downieville area I fully support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship’s continual maintainable of these trail systems. This trail system no only brings me personal joy, but it being substation recreation dollars into Downieville and the greater Lost Sierra region which depends on yearly recreation revenue. Trinity Stirling - 4/1/2020


This Project is crucial in pretecting the local communities by job creation and bringing tourism to these rural areas. Also helping the local environment by protecting these public spaces and the watershed. These trails are are the heartbeat for the outdoor community and are why I travel from my home in Reno Nevada every week to enjoy, spend money, and appreciate these communities. Tim Eddy - 4/3/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, and the Downieville & Quincy trail systems in general. These systems are a sustainable (as in, long lasting) utilization of the area, and benefit a huge range of the population, as opposed to private ownership or use, which severely limits the investment of revenue in the local economy, and instead moves it to other areas, through resource extraction by a private firm, or by ownership of a private entity, the wealth of which resides in a far off bank, and is expended with no preference for Plumas County. The trails allow so many different types of people to enjoy the area. Sitting in Downtown Downieville, you'll see all manner of cyclists, hikers, moto riders, and 4x4 drivers, all smiling through a coating of dirt. These people have equipped themselves with gear from business that depend on the existince of trails like this to make their passions a viable business, and in turn serve these folks who share that passion. So, for economic and philosophical reasons, I encourage you to continue supporting Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Sincerely, BenBen Clemens - 4/2/2020


This groups effort in gathering the information for this report should be commended so much information in a few pages. The amount of trail time vs person spending time on the trails sees huge and is testament to how much work they do to spread the good news. This groups venture in both Plumas and Sierra Counties is huge and the quality of maps, website information and work they do is amazing! Matt Boyd - 4/3/2020


The amount of work this organization does far outweighs the amount they request each year. This group is top notch, allows for recreation in an area that is in need of visitors, and does so with a minimal impact on the environment. This project should be funded and seen as an example of good stewardship of the public/private funds for public use. Matt Boyd - 4/3/2020


These trails are a blast to ride and always in need of some work. They bring people and jobs into the small communities which helps the small economy live. Jared - 4/3/2020


The trails system in the Downieville area has provided years of outdoor enjoyment for myself, my family, and numerous friends. The hard work of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in keeping the trails well maintained and safe has been instrumental in this. Please fund SBTS so they can continue the excellent work! Jeff Sperry - 4/4/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are an important recreational resource in the area. Please fund and support them. They are important because they: 1. Create jobs in two economically struggling counties. 2. Create recreational opportunities for people in the counties and the surrounding area. This brings dollars in to further support the local economy. 3. Create environmentally stable and sustainable trails that require less maintenance and minimize any negative environmental impact (e.g.,, erosion and fire hazard). Trails built by SBST standards protect the local watershed. SBST has a proven record of building sustainable, environmentally stable and functional trails. Thank you for the opportunity to provide my comments here. Eric Storne - 4/8/2020


These are very important projects to help sustain trails and economic development for these local communities. These grants create local employment while protecting watershed and trail systems that require less maintenance. Creating recreation opportunities will also positively impact the local economies. Johnnie Smith - 4/13/2020


I support SBTS for their efforts in obtaining a grant. They provide jobs and recreation in an area where it is very scarce. They provide substainable trails that bring in people from all over Nor Cal. These people spend money in the community and help support the local economy. Rod Glazebrook ROD GLAZEBROOK - 4/14/2020


I am here to strongly support the great work the SBTS is doing to restore the trails in and around the Lost Sierra area. I think they more than deserve all the grants they are applying for this year. Let me tell you why. I live in Kansas City, Missouri but try to come out to Northern California at least once a year to enjoy this area. It is outstanding and so is SBTS work which brings people like me to the area to enjoy the trails they build. I love to hike and mountain bike in the scenic Sierra Nevadas. Thanks to SBTS hard work, the economic benefit they provide, and their care for the land, I want to come back again and again to enjoy the area with my friends and family. In fact, SBTS work makes me want to move out there some day to enjoy the area on a daily basis. Please support the SBTS and their efforts by awarding them these well-deserved grants. They have earned them. Feel free to contact me with any questions about this important cause. Thanks, Mike Kidder Mike Kidder - 4/20/2020


I am in support of this grant by The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to maintain the trail system in the Downieville area. These trails are much used and much needed. They provide a huge economic boost to Downieville, and there maintenance helps to keep the area a world class destination for both mountain bikes and motorcycles.Frank Havlik - 4/15/2020


I am in complete support of SBTS receiving grant funds for ground operations trails maintenance in the Downieville region. The trails in the Downieville region have never been in better condition overall both for users and for habitat, and these grants are providing important employment opportunities for local residents. Trails are a source of community pride in a region that is severely depressed economically. Trails are a recreational and historic treasure for the Downieville region, and are a vital source of recreational income. Thank you for your continued support of SBTS and all the hard work they do to keep this public resource available to the public.Kurt Gensheimer - 4/16/2020


These trails are the gem of Northern California. And a key economic component of the region. Maintaining them is essential!! SBTS always does a good job here!Jonathan Rayner - 4/16/2020


Love the Mt. Hough trail system. Hidden gem that needs continued love if it's going to be a world class destination for recreation!!Jonathan Rayner - 4/16/2020


The trails in the Downieville area are such a great recreational resource. The amount of people that visit this area is increasing, and it is so important to maintain and grow this trail system. I love it here and wish to continue to utilize the trails that the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship are working so hard to take care of. Bobbi Wilcox - 4/16/2020


The trails in the Downieville area are such a great recreational resource. The amount of people that visit this area is increasing, and it is so important to maintain and grow this trail system. I love it here and wish to continue to utilize the trails that the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship are working so hard to take care of. Bobbi Wilcox - 4/16/2020


The Downieville OHV trail network is without a doubt a world class trail system. The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a long history of involvement here building and maintaining trails. I have personally spent many hours volunteering with this fine group and I strongly support their efforts to obtain this grant funding. OHV trail use is a shining example of positive economic activity in this economically distressed community. The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a proven track record of building and maintaining sustainable trails in an environmentally sensitive manner, and this will be money well spent. Thank You, Ron HeardRon Heard - 4/16/2020


Hundreds of hours per year of maintenance are required to maintain the Downieville trail system . SBST does a great job of performing as well as coordinating stakeholder efforts to get the necessary maintenance and repairs doneStu Wik - 4/17/2020


I've been visiting Downieville for several years now and it's one of the best destinations for mountain biking in California. The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is doing an amazing job providing recreational opportunities in small, rural struggling towns like Downieville and Quincy and as a result, these towns are beginning to flourish. They 100% deserve grant money to keep doing what they're doing. I'm hoping that one day they'll make it down to my small community in Bishop, California! Becky Timbers - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes does an excellent job in bringing the outdoors to the pubic through their work in the California mountains. Please support them in supporting all of us in getting outside by supporting them with their proposed grants. This work brings revenue to remote areas of the Sierra tha supports local folk as well. Thank you! LukeLuke Shenefield - 4/17/2020


Please fund the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship project. I live an hour away from Downieville but make the trip to mountain bike in the area several times a year. SBTS creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, and it creates local employment. Funding this program will create sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance and will keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Chris Miller - 4/17/2020


Please fund this organization to create local employment for people in the county, help support a sustainable trail system with lower maintenance, yet all the while protecting the watershed for people to enjoy the outdoors, which we need even more during these tough times.Jason Long - 4/17/2020


I support trail work in Downieville because: 1. It creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. 2. It creates local employment and economic development opportunities. 3. It creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. 4. It keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Thank you, TysonTyson Godfrey - 4/17/2020


As the GM of The Lure Resort located in Downieville, I feel it is important to support SBTS with this grant. Trails in our area are a huge draw for our community. From staying in town to spending money at locally owned businesses the community depends on these trails! Downieville trails also offer a place for local residents to enjoy adventure close to home. Now more than ever, we all need a place to escape to. With the help and support of SBTS our community is better. Melanie Garrido - 4/17/2020


The Downieville trails are vital to Downieville and our families enjoyment of the area. We have a home in Downieville and love the wonderful town and people there. Mountain biking creates recreational oppertunity for locals and brings thousands of visitors to the area who spend money at restaurants, bars, gas stations, hotels and the hardware and grocery store. The trails create local jobs and keep the area busy and full of life. Trails built sustainably require less maintenance and allow people to enjoy nature and be healthy. Keeping trails open and safe also helps protect the watershed and allows for easy access for those involved with the forest and water services. Devan Rosdahl - 4/17/2020


This is an excellent project put forth by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship that will lower the environmental impact of all trail users. I care about having high quality trails to enjoy as well as responsible management of them. Please consider this grant.Dylan Cisney - 4/17/2020


The Downeville and Quincy area mountain bike trail network are a critical piece of infrastructure and recreation for the area. I frequently travel up to that area in the warmer months for long weekends. We'll spend a good chunk of money on lodging, food etc. In aggregate this type of economic activity is hugely important to the area. Improving the trail system will only increase the size of that positive impact to the community. Plus trails are just awesome, we should have more! -DanDan Haeger - 4/17/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewarship does so much for our underserved trails and this grant would be very helpful!Katie Buitrago - 4/17/2020


I live in bishop CA but travel up to Downieville a few times a season to mountain bike. The continuing maintenance of these trail will keep me coming back. Sam orsello - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me and dozens of my friends and family. We must keep these trails open for the public use. These trails are economically beneficial to the surrounding communities because of the tourist traffic they create. I personally travel to, and use this trail system several times per year, and spend hundreds to thousands of dollars on each trip, depending on the length of my stay. The trails system created and maintained by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides, endless recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, stimulates local economies and local employment, and keeps outstandingtrails open and safe while protecting watershed. Please keep the trails open, Toby Briggs...Toby Briggs - 4/17/2020


I support SBTS Downieville Trails Projects. Randy Meyer - 4/17/2020


The Downieville Trail System is the best in Northern California. I ride mountain bikes & dirtbikes up there several times a year. Please help SBTS continue their great work. Thanks, Mike ...Mike Chaplin - 4/17/2020


Downieville trails are what got me enthusiastically involved in trails 20 years ago. I have traveled there numerous weekends per year, every year, since then to enjoy those trails. I know that many thousands of people per year do the same. It's a fantastic resource for potentially the millions of people within two to three hours of Downieville. I have had the pleasure meeting many local residents who work at the bike shops, ow hotels and restaurants, and own other businesses that derive much of their income from visitors who use the trails. I have had the privilege of working with Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship as a volunteer in helping them build sustainable trails that require very little maintenance year over year. The work on these trails keeps them open and safe for users while reducing the sediment runoff into local watersheds. Thank you for considering this grant. It will go to a valuable cause and worthy recipient. Erik Johnson - 4/17/2020


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in building and maintaining trails in the Downieville; Quincy; and surrounding areas.Richard Metro - 4/17/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is a win for all involved. All trail user groups - hikers, mountain bikers, and motocross riders, will benefit from having access to well maintained trails. In addition, the communities near the trails, and local businesses, will benefit. This is great for everyone, families, casual trail users, enthusiasts, etc... A perfect way to spend time that is positive.Prashant Singh - 4/17/2020


I am a California resident and long time user of the trail systems in the Downieville area. I believe the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is the best option for this grant award. They have a long and dedicated history to supporting everyone using the trail system. Thank you.Jeb Brown - 4/17/2020


I am writing in hopes that the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship continue to receive funding to support our amazing trails in the Downieville, Quincy and surrounding areas. By continuing to fund these projects, it will continue to provide opportunities for families (like mine) and outdoors enthusiasts the ability to access amazing and controlled outdoor recreational trails. With the current COVID-19 situation, I would also like to see citizens in the area continue to have employment opportunities by continuing to work on the trails while maintaining and preserving what is available. The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship group does an amazing job of thinking long-term sustainability when it comes to our environment. Funding would continue to promote ways to keep our trails and California ecologically sound (including watershed needs, erosion prevention, and the dangers of building trails illegally). Thank you! Jeff - 4/17/2020


As an avid dirtbiker and mt. biker and resident of Tahoe for the last 34 years I highly support SBTS in their ongoing efforts to maintain and build trails through out the forest in a responsible fashion. These trails allow outdoor enthusiasts to get out there, enjoy, breathe deep and appreciate what we have: we are able to do so because of SBTS great crew out there dedication to building and maintaining these trails. I certainly am grateful and appreciate their ongoing efforts and say thank you in advance to grants awarded in the future to allow SBTS to continue. Martha Janer - 4/17/2020


I support the work being done with the partnership with SBTS. I visit almost every weekend from Paradise. It provides excellent outdoor recreation and I love eating at the local restaurants while in town. The work done helps provide jobs and also brings in money to the local economy. Torey Feldhaus - 4/17/2020


Fantastic organization who develops high quality products with the utmost safety and efficiency.Chris Hawkins - 4/17/2020


Hello, I'm supportive of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's efforts to maintain 80 miles of trail in the Downieville Trail System. Maintenance is essential for trails yet always underfunded. Trail maintenance takes time, effort, tools, and staff and is essential for public safety and to protect the environment. ChristineChristine Dobrowolski - 4/17/2020


The Downieville and Quincy trails are extremely important to myself, the local community, and the local economy. The public trails create recreational opportunities for people from all over the state, support the local economy, and encourage sustainability. Kevin Kim - 4/17/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me personally and it is my view that we need to keep them open for the public to use and enjoy. This grant will help SBTS to work towards creating/facilitating a new tourism-based economy and jobs for those that live in these disadvantaged communities.Geoffrey K Hemmick - 4/17/2020


Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship - Every time I have been to any trail that Sierra Buttes has been involved in has been top notch! From goal setting and getting feed back from all riders in my groups. Sandra Rich - 4/17/2020


Downieville and Quincy trails are very important to me personally and it is my view that we need to keep them open for the public to use and enjoy. This grant will help SBTS to work towards creating/facilitating a new tourism-based economy and jobs for those that live in these disadvantaged communities.Geoffrey K Hemmick - 4/17/2020


We need funding please!!! Why? For these reasons.... •Recreation opportunities for visitors and locals •Creates local employment •Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance •Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedEarl Seneres - 4/17/2020


Hello, I am the marketing manager for a large bicycle component company (Shimano North America) and we are a long time supporter of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and we believe the work they do to maintain the trails in the Downieville area and surrounding areas is extremely important. Our business depends on pgreat places to ride and use the equipment we sell so supporting any group that is willing do the hard work and make a place a for our families and customers to access is critical. Aside from our interests to support these types of recreation opportunities we use the Downieville and Quincy areas to hold ride camps and typically bring large groups of people to the area on a ongoing basis. Many of the people we bring have never been to these areas and would not typically ever visit. So thanks the trail system the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship maintains we would not be bringing all of these people there and introducing them to this great place. Regards, -Joe Lawwill Shimano Marketing Manager North America company holds events of various types because of the trail system. Joe Lawwill - 4/17/2020


Hello, I am the marketing manager for a large bicycle component company (Shimano North America) and we are a long time supporter of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and we believe the work they do to maintain the trails in the Downieville area and surrounding areas is extremely important. Our business depends on pgreat places to ride and use the equipment we sell so supporting any group that is willing do the hard work and make a place a for our families and customers to access is critical. Aside from our interests to support these types of recreation opportunities we use the Downieville and Quincy areas to hold ride camps and typically bring large groups of people to the area on a ongoing basis. Many of the people we bring have never been to these areas and would not typically ever visit. So thanks the trail system the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship maintains we would not be bringing all of these people there and introducing them to this great place. Regards, -Joe Lawwill Shimano Marketing Manager North America company holds events of various types because of the trail system. Joe Lawwill - 4/17/2020


Hello and thank you for making this chance to comment. The Downieville trail system is a world renowned series of trails and is very important to me and many of the people I know who ride in the area. They get a lot of use but no funding for maintenance or other projects. This grant will help keep these very importnatn trails open and safe as well as create some local employment and support the struggling town of Downieville. I really hope to see this grant and project funded and I thank you for the consideration. ChrisChristopher Ruedy - 4/18/2020


This is going to be a fantastic project to improve the environmentally friendly recreation opportunities to the Downieville area. Definitely in need for this area. Thanks.Karen Siroky - 4/18/2020


I strongly support this grant for Downieville ground operations. Maintenance of trails is vital to the economic viability of the region. Granting funds to organizations that perform proper trail building and maintenance, maintains the viability of recreation along side environmental protections. Sincerely, Karen Lynaugh Karen M Lynaugh - 4/18/2020


The Trail Stewardship has been doing such a wonderful job maintaining and building the local trails. Our family and friends have enjoyed many days on the trails, and make many vacation plans to visit the area specifically because of them. Keeping the trails open and well maintained is a winning combination for visitors and the local economy. Thanks JohnJohn Aberg - 4/18/2020


Definitely needed!Doug Smith - 4/18/2020


This trail network provides a huge benefit to the region by bringing in much needed jobs and economic stimulus. Plus they are some of the best trails around!Tim Buckner - 4/18/2020


I support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship receiving grants to improve the Downieville trail system. These trails are the lifeblood of the local economy and having many sustainable and well built trail options allows trail users to spread out and reduce use impacts on overcrowded trails. All SBTS's previous trail work is proof of their ability to create high quality trails that offer a unique outdoor experience while protecting the wild areas and watersheds we value. Brian Old - 4/18/2020


I love mountain biking on these trails, let’s bring more economic help to the mountains by expanding the trails enticing more people to recreate.Brittany Yelland - 4/18/2020


Sierra Buttes really makes a difference. Please help them with funding! It is so important to preserve and continue these efforts. ElisaElisa Uribe - 4/18/2020


This strewardship is a no brainer, as it supports the economy in a county needing stimulus. I have been going to this area for over 30 years and seen first hand what it has done to the economy. This stewardship is hero. PLEASE SUPPORT! Thank you, ToddTodd Donaldson - 4/18/2020


I support thisPhil Kaznowski - 4/18/2020


I support this.Phil Kaznowski - 4/18/2020


Please support this great organization. They entice so many volunteers to drive to the mountains, and build trails for everyone! Todd McMahon - 4/18/2020


As a lifelong hiker, backpacker, horseback rider and cyclist, I support this project wholeheartedly. Multi-use trails like the ones that will be maintained and improved by this grant project are the future of recreation in our region. There are a lot of projects out there that specialize - off-road motor vehicle areas, fish stocking, etc. that are deserving in their own right, but the work of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship group gets support from all of them and more. The work they do is respectful of the wild lands that we share with Mother Nature, while providing specific, protected access for users who share responsibility for preserving that balance. These are people who get it - they understand their responsibility, they take their work seriously, and they want all of us - users from across the recreational spectrum - to not only use these trails, but also to become personally connected to their respectful use and long-term upkeep. Sincerely, Jay Van Rein Jay Van Rein - 4/19/2020


Downieville trail development and the recreational opportunities in the area are one of the major reasons I live in the Lost Sierra area and my business's success is dependent of the continued improvement and maintenance of the trail system. The economic impact created from tourism because of the Downieville trail system is not only good for me, but to all of the other businesses in these struggling rural areas. Regular maintenance will also help keep trails safe while protecting the watershed. Matthew Meyerl - 4/19/2020


I wanted to express my support for the grant application of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. This organization is working to connect communities that face many challenges and is a responsible steward to the environment. With a comprehensive vision and extensive experience, the organization has shown their abilities to work with land managers, communities and various user groups to provide access as well as economic benefit to the region. Thank you, ChrisChris Stanley - 4/19/2020


I wanted to express my support for the grant application of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. This organization is working to connect communities that face many challenges and is a responsible steward to the environment. With a comprehensive vision and extensive experience, the organization has shown their abilities to work with land managers, communities and various user groups to provide access as well as economic benefit to the region. Thank you, ChrisChris Stanley - 4/19/2020


As a northern Californian who has been coming to Downieville since the first article was published in Mountain Bike Action in 1996, I have been to Downieville to race, ride, camp, and spend money probably 100 times. There are thousands like me - we come to Downieville to support the community, and SBTS does all the hard work to make the area, the trails, and the experience worth it for outsiders to continue to visit. The continuing vision of the SBTS keeps businesses open, people working, and will do so well into the future by projects such as this and the many initiatives it supports and executes every year. This project has my support.Michael Paves - 4/19/2020


To whom it may concern, I'm writing you today to express my support for Ground Operations for SBTS.Not only am I a user of the trail systems in The Lost Sierra as a mountain biker, I 'am a second home owner in the town of Graeagle. Aside from the enjoyment that I receive as a user of the trails I'am also a beneficiary economically of their existence. The growing popularity of the Downieville and Mills Peak trails has and continues to attract vacation renters to the area that rent my home in Plumas Pines there by helping me to make my mortgage payments while also creating employment opportunities for full-time residents of the area, such as house keepers, landscapers and handymen. These vacation renters also spend money at local restaurants and stores, bringing much needed tourist dollars to Plumas County businesses. These are win win benefits, jobs and recreation as well as long term sustainability and healthy forests for current and future visitors to this beautiful part of California. Please support SBTS with continued resources for the important work they do and have done! Sincerely Charles BrownCharles Brown - 4/19/2020


This is critical work that keeps the trails safe and helps us all enjoy the amazing outdoors that the Lost Sierra has to offer!Elijah Grundel - 4/19/2020


This is a good cause and area that really can use the helpJon Rivas - 4/19/2020


It is imperative that funding for ground operations in the Downieville area be granted for this project. Outdoor recreation is a vital economic component of rural mountain communities in California's Sierra Nevada. Funding this work spurs visitors from all around the state, country and world to recreate in Sierra County, which in turn injects revenue into the community.James Bate - 4/20/2020


I am writing to express my support for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's ground operations in the Downieville area. I've been a resident of the north lake Tahoe/Truckee area for 19 years and I have been riding bikes in the greater Downieville area for that entire time. I have seen the trail system grow and develop over the years and I have been very impressed with the time, energy, and care that has been taken to minimize soil erosion and environmental impacts while also maximizing the fun that people are going to have while recreating. I believe that SBTS is a truly special organization that has done wonders for the local and regional communities through creation of recreational opportunities/trails, job creation, and economic enhancement. I think that their continued ground operations are an essential piece of the puzzle to keep the trails sustainable and in good condition for years to come. Thanks, Jeremy BensonJeremy Benson - 4/20/2020


The trails at Downieville were my first introduction to the vast network of trails in the Lost Sierra and it opened my eyes to how well the forest managers and a trail stewardship agency could operate together. I grew up in Montana and there is plenty of forest but not enough people willing to manage a network of trails like the ones in Downieville. Everywhere I've been on the Downieville trail network I've seen great upkeep, camaraderie between mountain bikers and moto riders. I've seen trail runners and hikers and everyone has been courteous and friendly. Everyone shared the trails as well as information and yielded right of way with a smile and a wave. I even saw people stopping on the trail once to pick up old trash that clearly wasn't theirs. That made me smile for a long time knowing some strangers loved the trail and forest so much they'd stop and pack out garbage that someone else left a long time ago. I have donated and bought merchandise for Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and will continue to do so because of the great environment they make available to thousands of people who love to recreate in the forest. I donate my time and trail work to my local agency in Reno but every time we head out of town for a mountain bike ride, Downieville is my top pick.Colin P Shea - 4/20/2020


I very much support the work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does. I am a mountain biker and travel from Chico to use these trails monthly. I see that the trails do need regular maintenance and would hate to see them fall into disrepair. Please support SBTS with this grant. Thanks you!Andrew Grayson - 4/20/2020


Hi, this trail stewardship group has opened up so much in the Downieville area. More employment, tons of recreational activities and they are working to make the trails safer and better for everyone. They also have big plans to link up some of these small mountain communities with trails which can bring economic growth to these smaller towns. I hope they can receive grant funding to continue all of their great work. Joe Asnault Chico, CA Joe Asnault - 4/20/2020


Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershed! Heather - 4/20/2020


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship organization is uniquely qualified to provide Maintenance on 80 miles of trail on the Downieville Trail System and CAL-Ida. Their work is top notch and provides employment to local workers. I can't think of a better organization to provide these services. Arnold Ambiel - 4/20/2020


Please fund this grant for trail maintenance. Our local 501c7 club, Reno Area Dirt Riders, will come out and volunteer on trail days for sure. Thank you! Don Schmidt RADDon Schmidt - 4/20/2020


I very much support the work that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does and believe they should receive the grants for which they have applied. The work they have done thus far in Downieville and Mt. Hough has created wonderful opportunities for recreation and brought much needed tourist dollars to the area. The future work they are hoping to do will undoubtedly build on that create an even greater example of what can be achieved with local and state cooperation. Please approve the grant applications filed by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you.Bill Engelhardt - 4/20/2020


Please support SBTS with this grantRob Shanks - 4/20/2020


Downieville has amazing recreation options that I don't want to loose. Funding is essential to keeping this special place open and one of my favorite mountain bike destinations.Isabella - 4/21/2020


I would not know about Downieville, Quincy or Graeagle if it wasn't for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and Yuba Expeditions. For the last 10 years, I have been heading up to those communities to ride amazing trails, stay at hotels, camp and eat at restaurants. I have gotten my friends to join me on guys trips to the mountains and they are all hooked. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has done so much for those communities and in helping people lead healthier more fulfilled lives. I have taken my family up there for the trail days and have helped to maintain the trails because it is such a great organization and they do great work. Hopefully they will receive this grant so they can continue to provide fiscal stimulus to these communities and employment for people who are working to make their communities better. Thank you, Terry Blesso Physical Education Teacher Mountain Bike Coach Vista del Lago High SchoolTerry Blesso - 4/21/2020


I support this project.Phil Kaznowski - 4/21/2020


I support this project.Phil Kaznowski - 4/21/2020


Please consider providing the grant for SBTS to maintian and improve these trails. We are bringing the kids up here to teach them about trail stewardship and will eventually own property up here to continue that legacy. It is an important part of our lives to work to restore prosperity to this region. Thank you!George Astin - 4/22/2020


I support this grant for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to continue their important work maintaining trails for public use and keeping them in good shape! This is a win win for users, the land, and the local community to provide more low impact rec opportunities for locals and visitors. emily peckenham - 4/22/2020


I support this grant for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to continue their important work maintaining trails for public use and keeping them in good shape! This is a win win for users, the land, and the local community to provide more low impact rec opportunities for locals and visitors. emily peckenham - 4/22/2020


I support this grant for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to continue their important work maintaining trails for public use and keeping them in good shape! This is a win win for users, the land, and the local community to provide more low impact rec opportunities for locals and visitors. emily peckenham - 4/22/2020


I support this grant for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to continue their important work maintaining trails for public use and keeping them in good shape! This is a win win for users, the land, and the local community to provide more low impact rec opportunities for locals and visitors. emily peckenham - 4/22/2020


The trails have users, and the dust needs to stay out of the water shed. This grant needs to happen.chris atkinson - 4/22/2020


I support SBTS and ask that you partner with them and award them grants to continue the work the trail work that they do. Trails are a valuable public asset to recreate in nature and also an economic engine for this portion of the Sierra. Scott Bartlebaugh - 4/22/2020


I look forward to traveling to Downieville to ride my mountain bike on their trails every year. I'm always impressed by the effort they put into maintaining the trails, and always aware of the need as they criss-cross some very fine watersheds and see a lot of use. I am aware that a lot of effort goes into this maintenance and always grateful for it. Every time I go to Downievillle in the summer it is swarmed with mountain bikers who have traveled in from other areas. They patronize shops in the areas and last summer I heard multiple shop keepers tell me, unsolicited, that mountain biking is the new gold rush for the area; it provides the economic stimulus the people living there need to keep their businesses afloat. Maintaining the trails is the key to keeping the draw to the area and the key to good forest and watershed health. Sam Diaz - 4/23/2020


I would like to urge CA State Parks to award the grant to SBTS for ground operations. SBTS is an extremely well-run organization that does great work keeping the trail system in great shape for visitors and and provides local employment.Colin Duwe - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


I give my support of this project. KURSTEN O'DONNELL - 4/23/2020


This is a great recreational trail system that directly and indirectly supports many businesses in the area. It should be funded.Scott Anderson - 4/25/2020


As a nearby resident I frequently use the trails in this area for recreation and know many others who do too. I support multi-use of these trails as I enjoy mountain biking, dirt biking and hiking. While on the trails I have met individuals from all over the country coming to this area for the recreation opportunity. It's important that these trails are maintained and more trails are built to support connectivity throughout the area. As such I urge you to approve this grant for the SBTS project. Peter Pensotti - 4/27/2020


I would like to speak out in support of expansion of trails, particularly motorized singletrack, in the Downieville & Quincy areas. SBTS has done excellent work in the past in this area, and this development has brought many visitors to enjoy the trails. Please do what you can to continue this development!Evan Freeman - 4/27/2020


To whom it may concern: Please support this grant because it creates recreation opportunities for visitors and locals. It will creates local employment. Creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Keeps trails open and safe while protecting watershedName - 4/27/2020


As a tahoe-based mountain biker, I am indebted to the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for the great work they've done on the downieville trail network, and I wholeheartedly support their ongoing efforts. The work done on 3rd Divide Trail recently is exemplary. Well-maintained trails are safer to ride, drain better to preserve watershed health while supporting the longevity of the trail itself, and are more fun! As Downieville is know as a mountain bike destination, these trails drive economic activity in the area and deserve our support. Thank you!Peter Kowalczyk - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, My name is Tim Rhode. I am a lifelong resident of Plumas County. I am writing this letter to show my support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to provide trail maintenance on the Downieville Trail System. This trail system is an integral part of creating outdoor recreational opportunities for local residents and visitors to our area. Having these visitors in our ld provides a boost to our local economy. Our communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and maintain a thriving community. I feel it is of great importance to our community to provide the funds to maintain this trail system. We need to continue to provide an amazing outdoor experience to locals and visitors by providing them with well maintained, safe trails. I look forward to seeing this project funded. It will be a positive impact on our area. I will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way I can. Thank you for your time, Tim Rhode Tim Rhode - 4/27/2020


Please award the above grant to the Sierra Buttes Trail stewardship so that they can continue to maintain the Downieville trail system for all users both motorized and non motorized. The Downiville trail system is truly a gem that I have enjoyed for many many years.Scott Kessler - 4/27/2020


Hello, I'm writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship ongoing maintenance efforts. I'm part of a coalition coordinating a large scale project called Orogenesis. (https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.html) It's a long distance backcountry mountain bike route spanning from Canada to Baja California. Just like the Pacific Crest Trail but for people on bikes. All told it's about 4,500 miles (!) long and about 30-40% singletrack trail. We have growing support from land managers, politicians, and rural communities throughout California, Oregon, and Washington and about 140 scouts out searching for lost trail connections on our public lands. We've identified our preferred alignment and it currently travels through Sierra City, Downieville, and Quincy and utilizes several of the trails these maintenance funds would target. Visions like the Sierra Buttes Connected Communities are exactly the type of recreation planning we support and seek to prioritize all along the length of Orogenesis. While the Orogenesis project is large and inspirational for most off road cyclists, it's projects at the local level like this that offer an opportunity to experience something larger during a day or weekend trip. Trail system hubs along the whole route will create loop riding options the right length for people to recreate and then spend time and money in the local communities. Downieville is a prime example. Here in Oregon we found that approximately 75% of Oregon Timber Trail riders like to camp and do day rides, where only about 8% are thru-riding the whole trail. This maintenance project, and other projects like it, fills that experience gap that's in high demand. Over 3,000 people from 28 different countries have downloaded the Oregon Timber Trail route guide and we expect the draw of Orogenesis to be even greater. We want to foster this increased interest in recreation near rural communities to create positive experiences for people recreating, as well as improve the livelihoods of the people living in these communities. Please contact me if you have any further questions, I'm looking forward to supporting this project throughout its lifespan and hopefully riding it someday soon! Thanks for your consideration, Gabriel Amadeus Tiller (503) 381-4456 Executive Director, Oregon Timber Trail Alliance https://oregontimbertrail.org/ Founding member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition https://www.ormtbcoalition.org/ Board member, Bikepacking Roots https://www.bikepackingroots.org A new way on old ground, Orogenesis Collective https://www.bikepackingroots.org/orogenesis.htmlNaGabriel Amadeus Tillerme - 4/27/2020


These guys are doing an amazing job and absolutely deserve our continuing support!Marcus Alexander - 4/27/2020


To Whom It May Concern, Our organization, TRAC, works in partnership with the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. We are writing this letter to show our support to SBTS and their efforts to secure State grant funds to provide trail maintenance on the Downieville Trail System. This trail system is an integral part of creating outdoor recreational opportunities for local residents and visitors to our area. Having these visitors in our communities provides a boost to our local economy. Our communities rely heavily upon outdoor recreation to provide jobs and economic growth to help build and maintain a thriving community. We feel it is vital to our community to provide the funds to maintain this trail system. We need to continue to provide an amazing outdoor experience to locals and visitors by providing them with well maintained, safe trails. We look forward to seeing this project funded. It will be a positive impact on our area. We will continue to support Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship any way we can. On behalf of all TRAC members, thank you for your time. Best Regards, Casey Williams TRAC Representative Casey Williams - 4/27/2020


Hello! I am writing to communicate how important trail maintenance is on 80 miles of trail in the Downieville Trail System and CAL-Ida. Trail systems like this are not only ridden locally, but used for connectivity between parts of CA and the western US in general! Bikepackers and day riders alike tend to spend their vacation time and dollars in communities with trail access! Please support the funding of the maintenance of the trails in this area! Thank you, Heather Rose Goleta, CAHeather Rose - 4/28/2020


Trail upkeep and maintenance is necessary for the Downieville area to maintain its status as a mountain bike destination. Many businesses thrive and survive on the recreational influx of the mountain bike and dirt bike community during summer and fall. The trail usage is very high in this area, and failure to maintain would result in degradation of the surrounding watersheds, and a loss of the positive influences that trail users have on the communities and economy. Thanks for your consideration!Murphy Gardner - 4/28/2020


Downieville is one of the best riding areas in the sierra’s. The trail stewardship know how to maintain and keep the trails in good shape. Keeping the trails in good shape makes them more fun and puts a lot of locals to work. I support this project. Thanks, Fred HabenichtFred Habenicht - 4/28/2020


Please support the SBTC with available Grants to facilitate trail permitting, construction and maintenance of existing and proposed trails. Continued Trail access is a vital part of the Town and local economies that rely on outdoor recreation. These trails should be multi use, providing for Hiking, mountain biking and Class ! pedal assisted e-bike usage. A network of connected trails is beneficial to the local communities and fulfills regional agencies charter to provide and expand recreation opportunities. The SBTC has demonstrated a great ability to partner with private and public to accomplish this mission. Cruz Arnett - 4/30/2020


I think this project would be a wonderful idea to utilize this beautiful area for the public and also provide opportunities to bring in future economic stimulus for the surrounding areas. Tyler Sandelin - 4/30/2020


Fund downieville and mt hough. We need more trails so the current ones don't get too blown outkim watt - 4/30/2020


I just wanted to write quickly in support of the SBTS grant request for Downieville Ground Operations. The organization greatly benefits the rural economies AND forestland through appropriate management, upkeep and maintainance of trails used by a wide variety of individuals for purposes of exercise and recreation. Through these systems, a greater number of people gain easy, _safe_ (for humans and the ecosystem), access and exposure to outdoors. In addition, multiple towns and municipalities have benefited for tourism brought though hiking, cycling and related activities. With the benefit of tourism to communities which otherwise don’t benefit from tourist traffic, businesses are better able to remain healthy when so many small towns are struggling against migration to metropolitan areas. For these reasons and more, I ask that you support safe access to the forests, improved forest monitoring and management, and rural communities by extending this grant to an organization that has repeatedly proven to have both good intent, and action. Thank you.Michael Stofan - 5/1/2020


SBTS has proven over the many years and miles that they know how to take care of trails and the precious forests the trails wind through. The Downieville trails are heavily used by hikers and mountain bikers alike so it's important to keep them well-maintained. These trails draw people year after year from far and wide to visit our little corner of the mountains and their visits are a vital part of the badly eroding economic foundation in this area. Please provide this grant to SBTS to preserve this economic engine we so desperately need.Jennifer Lacy - 5/2/2020


Trails will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals which will in turn create local employment and improve the local economy. Trail work will result in sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, in turn keeping trails open and safe for all users while protecting watershed.Michael Shibata - 5/2/2020


Trails will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals which will in turn create local employment and improve the local economy. Trail work will result in sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, in turn keeping trails open and safe for all users while protecting watershed.Michael Shibata - 5/2/2020


Trails will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals which will in turn create local employment and improve the local economy. Trail work will result in sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, in turn keeping trails open and safe for all users while protecting watershed.Michael Shibata - 5/2/2020


Trails will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals which will in turn create local employment and improve the local economy. Trail work will result in sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, in turn keeping trails open and safe for all users while protecting watershed. Michael Shibata - 5/2/2020


This is a win-win for all. Riders get to explore some beautiful areas in our great mountains and the locals that live in these communities get to earn a decent living without destroying the ecosystem. Truly sustainable living!Michael Cannon - 5/2/2020


What were you thinking??? Mountain biking and trail-building destroy wildlife habitat! Mountain biking is environmentally, socially, and medically destructive! There is no good reason to allow bicycles on any unpaved trail! Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: https://mjvande.info/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking.... A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see https://mjvande.info/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions. Mountain bikers also love to build new trails - legally or illegally. Of course, trail-building destroys wildlife habitat - not just in the trail bed, but in a wide swath to both sides of the trail! E.g. grizzlies can hear a human from one mile away, and smell us from 5 miles away. Thus, a 10-mile trail represents 100 square miles of destroyed or degraded habitat, that animals are inhibited from using. Mountain biking, trail building, and trail maintenance all increase the number of people in the park, thereby preventing the animals' full use of their habitat. See https://mjvande.info/scb9.htm for details. Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT? To see exactly what harm mountain biking does to the land, watch this 5-minute video: http://vimeo.com/48784297. In addition to all of this, it is extremely dangerous: https://mjvande.info/mtb_dangerous.htm . For more information: https://mjvande.info/mtbfaq.htm . The common thread among those who want more recreation in our parks is total ignorance about and disinterest in the wildlife whose homes these parks are. Yes, if humans are the only beings that matter, it is simply a conflict among humans (but even then, allowing bikes on trails harms the MAJORITY of park users -- hikers and equestrians -- who can no longer safely and peacefully enjoy their parks). The parks aren't gymnasiums or racetracks or even human playgrounds. They are WILDLIFE HABITAT, which is precisely why they are attractive to humans. Activities such as mountain biking, that destroy habitat, violate the charter of the parks. Even kayaking and rafting, which give humans access to the entirety of a water body, prevent the wildlife that live there from making full use of their habitat, and should not be allowed. Of course those who think that only humans matter won't understand what I am talking about -- an indication of the sad state of our culture and educational system. Mike Vandeman - 5/3/2020


This is an amazing area to recreate in and the trails make it so....it also draws people to the area to spend their money. This is an important agency that does awesome work for the betterment of the area.kathykarlovic - 5/3/2020


SBTS has done a tremendous job maintaining and creating backcountry access in the Downieville area. My 6 person family recreates in the area which also supports local businesses. We mountain bike, hike, trail run and use the area trail system extensively.Jeff Dupras - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the California Mountain Bike Coalition, a non-profit organization that supports mountain biking organizations across the state of California. Trail stewardship is one of our highest priorities. CAMTB would like to encourage the grant approval for environmental planning and analysis on adding potential 40 miles to the Claremont zone connecting existing campgrounds and trails. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails in turn provide important local employment to a variety of business’s and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. I’ve attended many of their volunteer trail days so I have first hand knowledge of the high standards that SBTS holds themselves up to. They build sustainable trails which require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of upmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Best Regards, Vernon Huffman, Board Member, CAMTB Vernon Huffman - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the California Mountain Bike Coalition, a non-profit organization that supports mountain biking organizations across the state of California. Trail stewardship is one of our highest priorities. CAMTB would like to encourage the grant approval for construction of 30+ miles of new trail on the Mt Hough Trail System. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails in turn provide important local employment to a variety of business’s and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. I’ve attended many of their volunteer trail days so I have first hand knowledge of the high standards that SBTS holds themselves up to. They build sustainable trails which require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of upmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Best Regards, Vernon Huffman, Board Member, CAMTB Vernon Huffman - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the California Mountain Bike Coalition, a non-profit organization that supports mountain biking organizations across the state of California. Trail stewardship is one of our highest priorities. CAMTB would like to encourage the grant approval for trail maintenance on 70+ miles of trail including Mt Hough Trail System, Claremont, Nelson Creek, Mt Fillmore. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails in turn provide important local employment to a variety of business’s and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. I’ve attended many of their volunteer trail days so I have first hand knowledge of the high standards that SBTS holds themselves up to. They build sustainable trails which require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of upmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Best Regards, Vernon Huffman, Board Member, CAMTB Vernon Huffman - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the California Mountain Bike Coalition, a non-profit organization that supports mountain biking organizations across the state of California. Trail stewardship is one of our highest priorities. CAMTB would like to encourage the grant approval for ground operations on the 80 miles of trails surrounding Downieville and CAL-Ida. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails in turn provide important local employment to a variety of business’s and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. I’ve attended many of their volunteer trail days so I have first hand knowledge of the high standards that SBTS holds themselves up to. They build sustainable trails which require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of upmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Best Regards, Vernon Huffman, Board Member, CAMTB Vernon Huffman - 5/4/2020


I am writing in support of the Sierra buttes stewardship and trail work. These trails are invaluable in providing local employment, encouraging visitors to recreate here bringing economic stimulus and providing for the environment with sustainable trails that help maintain the valuable watershed. Kim Delkener - 5/4/2020


I am writing in full support of this grant being requested by this group. They have been responsible for so much work for all public and need more resorces to continue.Bob Garrow - 5/4/2020


Please approve this application. The work described by the applicant is vital to the comunity. Economically and socially, and environmentally. Thank you Dan reynolds - 5/4/2020


As a native Californian there is little I cherish more than wilderness access. My favorite was to enjoy that access is on a bicycle, which is why projects like this this one are important to me. Additionally, my experience with SBTS as a member and volunteer have convinved me they are agency best equipped to tackle these projects in the region with respect for the environment, and the local community. Michael E Spady - 5/4/2020


SBTS trail building and maintenance keeps me and my family returning to the region multiple times each year for mountain biking, hiking, and community events. The prospect of more trail built on Mt Hough is very exciting and I know that SBTS is the organization to get it done and done right with maxiumum benefit to the local community.Michael E Spady - 5/4/2020


SBTS trail building and maintenance keeps me and my family returning to the region multiple times each year for mountain biking, hiking, and community events. The dream of more trail and more access is real, and SBTS will get us there. The work to date on Mt Hough is world class and the prospect of continuing that work is exciting. Michael E Spady - 5/4/2020


SBTS trail building and maintenance keeps me and my family returning to the region multiple times each year for mountain biking, hiking, and community events. The dream of more trail and more access is real, and SBTS will get us there. Michael E Spady - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the San Diego Mountain Biking Association and the California Mountain Biking Coalition. These non-profits share the passion that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and have similar missions to improve and increase trail access on public lands in California. SDMBA would like to encourage the grant approval sought by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) for ground operations on the 80 miles of trails surrounding Downieville and CAL-Ida. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails, in turn, provide important local employment to a variety of businesses and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. They build sustainable trails that require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of utmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Respectfully, Susie Murphy Executive Director, San Diego Mountain Biking Association Secretary, California Mountain Biking Coalition Susie Murphy - 5/4/2020


I am in full support of the work being done by SBTS. They are invigorating life in to the California economy and culture in a beneficial, sustainable manner. Bryson Malone - 5/4/2020


I strongly support this grant, as it will create recreation opportunities for visitors and locals, generate local employment, creates sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance, and keep trails open and safe while protecting watershed. Theodore Gilliland - 5/4/2020


I'm writing in support of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and its trail building efforts. The SBTS provides invaluable support to local communities, creates economic opportunities, and helps protect the watershed. Matt Dambrov - 5/4/2020


I have recreated in the Downieville area on both my dirt bike (moto) and mountain bicycle since the 1990s. This is a beautiful and unique area, and whenever I am in the area I make sure to spend some money in the local restaurants and grocery shops for food and whatever else I need. I think trails should be maintained and the trail network expanded. It is crucial that trails be FUN and SUSTAINABLE, for both excellent recreation and responsible environmental stewardship. Please fully fund this important grant. Thank you!Frank Giraffe - 5/4/2020


The trail system around Downieville is incredibly important to me for recreation and probably more so to the businesses and residents that depend on me and my groups visiting the area multiple times per year. Proper maintenance is also important to maintain a safe and sustainable watershed. Please support the area by approving the grant request.Andrew Waite - 5/4/2020


Downieville is such an important place for outdoor recreation. Properly maintaining the trail system is essential to the continued success of the town. Improving trails beyond the standard system decrease rider density and improves return visits. The more we can do to improve and expand rideable trails, the greater the positive economic benefit. Jesse Passafiume - 5/4/2020


I think it's important to continue to develop trails systems for many reasons. We visit this area as a family every year to ride bikes on excellent trails. It's great to get the kids out to remote areas away from the urban sprawl where they can pedal for miles without seeing any buildings. New trails and maintaining existing trails is of high importance to me.Gabe Brown - 5/4/2020


I am writing today representing the California Mountain Bike Coalition, a non-profit organization that supports mountain biking organizations across the state of California. Trail stewardship is one of our highest priorities. CAMTB would like to encourage the grant approval for trail maintenance on 70+ miles of trail including Mt Hough Trail System, Claremont, Nelson Creek, Mt Fillmore. These trails provide important recreation opportunities for both locals and visitors. Thousands of our constituents are among those who rely on these trails for their outdoor experience. The trails provide important exposure to nature and offer a great opportunity to both exercise and enjoy riding bikes. These trails in turn provide important local employment to a variety of business’s and have provided economic relief to struggling communities. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has a strong reputation for their knowledge and skill in sustainable trail construction and maintenance. Their commitment to seeing these trails last for future generations is exemplary. The care they show to the environment is also impressive. I’ve attended many of their volunteer trail days so I have first hand knowledge of the high standards that SBTS holds themselves up to. They build sustainable trails which require less maintenance over time. They also keep these trails safe for the users while protecting the watershed at the same time. Again, we support the grant application as funding this work is of upmost importance to those that rely on the trails, and to the environment on which they exist. Best Regards, Vernon Huffman, Board Member, CAMTB Vernon Huffman - 5/4/2020


I'm writing to support the grant request for the Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue Team. As you may have read, they are a 100% volunteer organization. No member including the Board of Directors has ever taken payment for there services. You may also know, in there over 45 years of serving the state of California, they have rescued nearly 600 people. Many of these victims have been OHV users including Snowmobilers, Off Road ATV's and Motorcycle users, Snowcat's and Snowbikes. Please help support this very important organization by fulfilling there grant requests. If needed, I'm happy to further discuss why TNSAR is a great organization and a worthy recipient of the grant funds. Sincerely, Chris McConnell Chris McConnell - 3/25/2020


I was born and raised in Tahoe City (58 year resident). I have seen many changes over the years. I retired in 2012 from North Tahoe Fire Protection District, with 33 years of service. I retired at the rank of Captain. I have been a Search and Rescue team member for 33 years, 23 of those with Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue and the other 10 years with Placer County Sheriff's Department-Tahoe. As a professional firefighter and a SAR volunteer I have seen the demand for EMS, Fire, Law and Rescue services grow exponentially not only in Tahoe City, but the entire Lake Tahoe area and beyond. I've seen the demand on volunteers to provide services and specialized equipment that are not available or paid for by the local agencies. These volunteers not only provide time, equipment and expertise, they also conduct fund raising to meet the ever changing financial needs of the organizations they volunteer for. If not for the dedicated members of TNSAR, many backcountry skiers, snowmobilers, ATV/UTV, Jeepers and other back country explorers may have lost their lives waiting to be rescued. I totally support TNSAR and their request for an OHV grant. Respectfully, Brandnew Ray O'Brien Ray O'Brien - 4/6/2020


Tread Lightly, Inc. is very helpful in our OHV endeavors here in California and it is important that we carry a consistent theme in our efforts to tread lightly. Please approve this grant.mike johnston - 5/1/2020


This request should be funded. The "Tread Lightly" program is instrumental to responsible OHV use. Their outreach and social media communication efforts are essential to educate OHV users and the general public about how and what is meant by responsible OHV use. They provide sensible and understandable guidelines which can (and are) support by organizations and individuals advocating responsible use and stewardship of our outdoor recreational resources. Their focus on young people will pay dividends to all of us in the future. I am current president of the Eastern Sierra 4x4 ClubJohn Shepherd - 5/4/2020


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