Skip to Main Content
Menu
Contact Us Search
OHV Title

2017/2018 Public Comments to Preliminary Applications

AGENCIES SUBMITTING PRELIMINARY APPLICATIONS

Please click on an agency to view the public comments received for that agency's preliminary application. All agencies submitting preliminary applications are listed below and only those agencies shown in bold received public comments.

BLM FIELD OFFICES

BLM Arcata Field Office asked for more than the allotted amount for their field office. Please reduce requested amount to less than $45,113. Thank you Jesse Irwin - 3/26/2018


We are disappointed once again to see that the Bakersfield office has once again submitted applications only for law enforcement funding. We understand that the BFO's primary focus is O&G development, but the area covered by that office also has significant recreational opportunity, and there needs to be more consistent management of that opportunity. The BFO manages areas with significant OHV opportunity, including Keyesville and the Temblors. The BLM has spent much effort at Keyesville with refining the travel plan, installing signage, and doing historical preservation. Additional ground operations funding is badly needed to manage the area The current practice seems to be leaving the area to be managed by the adjacent Sequoia National Forest OHV program. As for the Temblors, much work has been done toward planning use for that area. Although an OHV planning grant was funded for the Temblors, the project remains partially completed. In addition, the road and trail system in the Temblors has seen considerable erosion over the last few years and is badly in need of maintenance. Once planning is completed for the Temblors there will be a great need for management and maintenance, and we would like to see additional staff positions funded by a ground operations grant for that area. bruce whitcher - 4/1/2018


The Bishop BLM actively engages the OHV community and it is a good agency to partner with. The funds will be put to good use in the premier areas of Tinemaha, Tungsten and Alabama Hills. This is just a start on the work that needs to be done in the Alabama Hills area. As visitation continues to increase there will be a greater need to educate and provide services to the user groups (like restrooms). The Eastern Sierra 4x4 Club is glad to partner with this BLM office. Mike Johnston - 3/21/2018


The Bishop BLM office covers an immense area and their law enforcement helps to remind the OHV community that if you abuse it, you lose it. Their area has many historic sites and fragile areas that are too easily damaged and need the additional protection of law enforcement. Mike Johnston - 3/21/2018


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. It is general knowledge in our area that there are very few Law Enforcement Officers patrolling our public lands. While the vast majority of OHV users obey the regulations and respect our public lands, there are those few that do not. The people that violate protective laws on our public lands need to know that Law Enforcement is out there and that they may be caught and prosecuted. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help. Thank You Pat Woods - 4/1/2018


I support the BLM grant proposal for their ground operations grant and their Law Enforcement grant. We need the Law Enforcement to help better educate the public. Randy Gillespie - 4/1/2018


I support the BLM grant proposal for their ground operations grant and their Law Enforcement grant. We need the Law Enforcement to help better educate the public. Randy Gillespie - 4/1/2018


I support the BLM grant proposal for their ground operations grant and their Law Enforcement grant. We need the Law Enforcement to help better educate the public. Randy Gillespie - 4/1/2018


Increasing the Law Enforcement presence in the BLM Bishop Field Office management area will be a benefit to all users. As a respectful OHV user I am disappointed when I see the impact of a small faction of other users who choose to not follow the rules. Unfortunately it is the few abusers that seem to establish the reputation of all OHV users. There is increasing evidence for abuse by non-motorized (i.e. bicycle) users. No matter what the source, a higher Law Enforcement profile in the back country will encourage everyone to respect our public lands by following the rules. . John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


This project should be approved and funded. It has been several years since I visited the Tinemaha overlook but the access road was in need to repair at that time and the 2016-2017 winter season was several and road erosion is probably much worse now. Many of the trails in the Tungsten Hills need refurbishment. If the trails are not maintained or obstructions removed, “work abounds” and “alternates” soon appear! The Alabama Hills Entrance is getting rather shabby. Installed shade, picnic tables and bear-proof trash receptacle will significantly improve its utility and use. Monitoring trails and roads will improve BLM’s ability to identify needed maintenance t and repairs and plan efficiently so available funding is used wisely and to the greatest benefit to the public. Proving educational information, keeping the staging and trail heads clean will encourage visitors to treat the areas with respect. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


The Lassen Motorcycle Club has worked closely with the Eagle Lake Field Office for many years and continues to do so. As the Lassen MC Legislative Officer, we strongly support the 2018 Eagle Lake Law Enforcement grant application. The BLM Ranger, along with other BLM Rangers from other Field Offices have provided more presence then the amount of the OHV application. The BLM Ranger provides excellent communication to the OHV community. Scott Maas - 3/21/2018


As the Legislative Officer for the Lassen Motorcycle Club, our organization works closely with the Eagle Lake Field Office. We strongly support the Grounds Operation grant application. The Eagle Lake Field Office does a lot more ground work than the application is requesting. Scott Maas - 3/21/2018


I am the Legislative Officer for the Lassen Motorcycle Club. The Lassen MC works closely with the Eagle Lake Field Office on their grant applications. The Lassen MC strongly supports the 2018 Acquisition grant application. These acquisitions are important for existing and future use at Fort Sage and the Wendel OHV riding areas. Scott Maas - 3/21/2018


The El Centro BLM manage OHV areas that enjoy a huge amount of visitation and require large grants to provide effective management. When they mention heavy equipment at the dunes, there have been times during major weekends when overnight blowing sand has put a foot high fresh sand on the only road leading out of a camping area. Campers, who had to leave, were able to because the BLM had heavy equipment and opperators ready to go. All the grants here are very reasonable and should be fully funded. Ed Stovin CORVA Ed Stovin - 3/27/2018


The Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) is one of the most used motorized recreation areas in the state and currently contains area closures due to critical habitat of Peirson’s Milk-vetch. The visitors to this area need the have some way to know where these closures are located so they don’t inadvertently enter these areas. This Grant will allow the resources for the BLM to adequately mark the boundaries of these closures. I support this Grant Richard Holliday - 4/1/2018


The Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) is one of the most used motorized recreation areas in the state. This use of motorized recreation vehicles is not without some risk. By having experienced professional Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and rescue vehicles available can offer medical support for visitors that may need assistance. This Grant is essential to have the required staff on hand and the equipment they need to help visitors when the need may arise. Please fully support this necessary grant request. Richard Holliday - 4/1/2018


This Ground Operations Grant, requested from the El Centro field office, will help keep El Centro BLM area recreation areas open, clean and available for visitors. The requests for maintenance workers allow the BLM personal to keep the restrooms clean and the roads cleared for visitor access. By having trash receptacles available should help reduce the amount of trash in the area and reduce the amount of time required by the BLM personnel in picking up the wind deposited trash. Having seasonal staff available to answer visitor questions and explain the rules for the area will help visitors have a better recreation experience. I support the full funding for this Grant. Richard Holliday - 4/1/2018


Given the severity of the dual crises facing life on Earth these days (global mass extinction and climate disruption), it is dumbfounding that a small minority group of privileged people continue to be granted so much control over so much land. It makes me ill to think that nearly a quarter million dollars of Californian tax dollars go to support such a destructive and polluting fringe sport on the BLM lands of the Shasta region alone. From a purely logical stance rooted in seriously addressing the crises we face, these dollars should be used to eliminate OHVs, reforest the trails and roads, and hire local police departments to refuse BLM access to anyone carrying on OHV. The majority of the population favors ideas like those I've suggested above! I can hear OHV boosters claiming all sorts of rights, and this is the problem. Rights for living communities of life are subordinate to the rights of individual humans. If these people actually were concerned about life on Earth, they wouldn't be drawn to such an abusive way to "experience wilderness." If OHV groups have enough money to bribe the forest service, BLM and the state to have access to public land, they can certainly pool their money and go buy their own land to destroy. Brien Brennan - 3/8/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org (BRC), a national non-profit recreation group, supports grants # G17-01-14-G01 and G17-01-14-L01. BRC has reviewed the proposals and believes they are appropriate based on the fact the agency manages a critically important destination OHV facility that services the rider community from the S.F. Bay Area, Greater Sacramento Area, and many other population centers in Northern California and Southern Oregon. The Chappie-Shasta OHV Area has embraced the use of diverse partnerships as a synergistic force multiplier when it comes to the management of motorized use on designated roads, trails, and areas. This unit also contributes to the local economy according to recent studies. Last year, the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) published its 2017 Outdoor Recreation Economy Report that outdoor recreation generates $887 billion dollars in consumer spending and employs 7.6 million Americans. LINK TO OIA 2017 REPORT https://outdoorindustry.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/OIA_RecEconomy_FINAL_Single.pdf This report highlights and details the significant economic impact that both motorized and non-motorized recreation has in this country. The OIA report is further supported by new prototype statistics from the Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account (ORSA) released on February 18, 2018 by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) show that the outdoor recreation economy accounted for 2.0 percent ($373.7 billion) of current-dollar GDP in 2016. In addition, the outdoor recreation economy grew 3.8 percent in 2016, compared to growth of 2.8 percent in the overall economy. The BEA stated that the historical lack of detailed federal data regarding outdoor recreational activities has handicapped both the private and public sectors. They also said the release is a milestone for business executives, small-business owners, entrepreneurs, and government officials, who will rely on these detailed data to plan, grow, and gain new insights into this dynamic part of the U.S. economy. LINK TO BEA REPORT https://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/industry/orsa/orsanewsrelease.htm The BEA data showed that Motorized Vehicles was the largest activity within conventional outdoor recreation in 2016, accounting for $59.4 billion of gross output. Recreational vehicles accounted for more than half of this value at $30.0 billion. Legal and well managed OHV recreation at Chappie also aids local law enforcement efforts to address illegal riding by directing OHV use to designated facilities designed to offer sustainable OHV recreation (both casual riding and permitted events) for current and future generations. BRC believes this unit serves as a national model for managed OHV recreation in the 21st Century. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/21/2018


As a long term property owner in the Knoxville Area of Napa County, I strongly support the "Restoration" Grant Application dated 3/5/18 that BLM has submitted to the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division. A good (or bad) example is the destruction of the McNab Cypress Trees at the intersection of Devil's Head Road and Adams Ridge Road. Joseph Erasmy - 3/21/2018


I have reviewed the grant application submitted by the BLM - Redding Field Office for Ground Operations. I have also viewed and inspected many of specific trails and components addressed in the narrative after working directly with the Outdoor Recreation Supervisor and staff. In short, the BLM personnel continue to show a strong dedication and continuity in the management of the Chappie-Shasta OHV Recreation Area. They have demonstrated the ability to provide quality operations and maintenance to meet the public and OHV users needs. I totally support the continued financial support for this program as submitted. Michael Mitchell - 3/25/2018


As a long term property owner in the Knoxville Area of Napa County, I strongly support the "Restoration" Grant Application dated 3/5/18 that BLM has submitted to the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division. A good (or bad) example is the destruction of the McNab Cypress Trees at the intersection of Devil's Head Road and Adams Ridge Road. Joseph Erasmy - 3/21/2018


US FOREST SERVICE

This grant request reads as though it is business as usual at Wildomar OHV area. $83,00 to manage this area. Problem is the area is closed now. Closed due to a fire in the area recently. I don't know when it will open, but until then I'm not sure if we need to fund all the specialists and regular maintenance work such as cleaning the rest rooms etc when there are no visitors. I hope the forest can get the area open soon. If the CNF would like help, maybe coordinating volunteers to work out there, please let me know. I have volunteered in the Descanso District in the past and would come up there if it would help get the area opened. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


This is my home area, so I am happy to comment on this grant. I am also happy to have supplied a few of the volunteer hours there. All the items appear to be in line for smooth operations there. I fully support the purchase of an excavator for the area. The area can go for many months with no rain at all, then get violent rain events which can move a lot of soil. After the rain, there is a short amount of time to fix areas in need work due to rapid drying of the soil. This purchase would allow more sustainable management of the area, which helps everyone who wants to see the area succeed. I would love to see the hand pump well in the Corral Canyon Campground get fixed. I used to use it to get water. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


SO... Last year it was a whopping $111,000. THIS CYCLE, they greedily demand just under $84,000 for an area, by their OWN ADMISSION, is scheduled to be CLOSED OFF to ALL PUBLIC ACCESS until after 2020 (or longer). In their own words, " In October of 2017, approximately 60-70 % of the OHV Area trail network was burned over in the Wildomar Fire"!! As stated by others - "If there is even a HINT of a light misting from a few wayward clouds OR even an coincidental appearance of a light breeze coming from the Pacific Ocean, they RUSH UP THE MOUNTAIN with great haste in efforts to SLAM SHUT EVERY GATE WITHIN THE SANTA ANA MTN RANGE in the Trabuco Ranger District". This district has proven itself to be ANTI-OHV at every turn (except when it comes to asking for OUR green sticker funds, of course). NO ONE who believes in equal access for all, should EVER support such an agency with OUR MONEY !!! UNTIL ISSUES ARE CLEARED UP AND UNLAWFUL ORDERS ARE DEALT WITH, I RECOMMEND THE FOLLOWING: AS A TAXPAYER & OWNER OF SEVERAL GREEN STICKER VEHICLES, I STRONGLY ADVISE THE OHV DIVISION DENY ANY AND ALL FUNDING TO THE TRABUCO RANGER DISTRICT (NORTH) !!! Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


I have a comment on the Eldorado National Forest Ground Operations project. I believe that the Eldorado forgot to include a much needed chemical toilet for the Barrett Lake Trail/Campground in this year's OHV grant application. I would like to see them add this and all of the associated costs to their final Ground Operations application. If this addition constitutes a Development category project, then I would like to see them submit a new Development project for this purpose in the final application stage. Thank you. Lyle Hobart - 4/1/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. We are an active partner with the Humbolt-Toiyabe Nation Forest’s Bridgeport Ranger District and have adopted the Mount Patterson trail in the Sweetwater Range. We have provided trail maintenance on the Mount Patterson trail and provided education to other users of this unique trail. Our club will continue to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to off-road enthusiasts. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. We are an active partner with the Humbolt-Toiyabe Nation Forest’s Bridgeport Ranger District and have adopted the Mount Patterson trail in the Sweetwater Range. We have provided trail maintenance on the Mount Patterson trail and provided education to other users of this unique trail. Our club will continue to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to off-road enthusiasts. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


With growing use in recreation and motorized sports in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area our goal is to serve the public and resources. With changing days, we strive to keep our avalanche center and recreation area open. We are handing out maps and daily permits and keeping records of the constant use in this area. We work together with many departments to maintain and operate in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area to protect seasonal closures with changing conditions. As partners with the biologist we are recording all sightings of endangered species and protecting the habitat that they strive to live in. Daily we are contacting as many users as we can to give them information on current conditions. Working together we manage the Pacific Crest Trail crossing for snowmobile use and patrol wilderness boundaries by marking a clear route with poles. We would like to gain a larger staff to help with the growing use and make purchases of new gear that would aid in the ability of the staff to safely and efficiently manage the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area and Bridgeport Avalanche Center. Brett J Flaharty - 4/1/2018


With growing use in recreation and motorized sports in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area our goal is to serve the public and resources. With changing days, we strive to keep our avalanche center and recreation area open. We are handing out maps and daily permits and keeping records of the constant use in this area. We work together with many departments to maintain and operate in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area to protect seasonal closures with changing conditions. As partners with the biologist we are recording all sightings of endangered species and protecting the habitat that they strive to live in. Daily we are contacting as many users as we can to give them information on current conditions. Working together we manage the Pacific Crest Trail crossing for snowmobile use and patrol wilderness boundaries by marking a clear route with poles. We would like to gain a larger staff to help with the growing use and make purchases of new gear that would aid in the ability of the staff to safely and efficiently manage the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area and Bridgeport Avalanche Center. Brett J Flaharty - 4/1/2018


With growing use in recreation and motorized sports on the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest in the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area during winter months we are in need of more funding to promote education and safety in dangerous avalanche terrain. We strive every year to reach out and enhance and improve awareness with our free snowmobile avalanche awareness clinics. We offer an avalanche beacon checker at the trailhead and have an avalanche beacon park to brush up on your rescue skills. The hope would be to make these classes bigger and better to bring safe backcountry use to the user group. This season we made it on to avalanche.org with weekly goals of getting to know the snow pack and conditions and put out observations and avalanche summaries. We are in need of growing our staff and avalanche center to grow our forecast zones to continue to serve the public by putting out a great product that can help them recreate safely. Brett J Flaharty - 4/1/2018


With an overactive contingent of recreationists on the National Forests, the need to support & fund programs that manage such functions are critical. With one of the largest public land areas in the lower 48 states, the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, is a huge resource with financial needs. Off Highway & Over Snow Vehicle recreation is growing in popularity, with the demand falling on the responsibility of the local forest rangers & their decomposing infrastructure. The California OHV grant is an essential cache of capital that could compliment the underfunded programs that people rely on for safety & enjoyment. In particular the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area, near Sonora Pass on the H-T National Forest, is such a program that could benefit from this financial allocation. Not only does this program protect natural resources & threatened wildlife, it allows for beneficial USMC training to be conducted on public land with permitted restrictions. The mostly snowmobile dominated recreation area has been a refuge for those backcountry travelers with expert skills & a desire to sled in an extreme alpine environment. This area is managed by only a few but supports the recreational opportunities for so many locals & those who travel here for this unique experience. The ground operations personnel at the BWRA have an overwhelming agenda. Not only do they patrol Wilderness boundaries & closures but they create areas where non-motorized Pacific Crest Trail thru-hikers can maintain their solitude. The forest rangers here check for CA OHV registrations & also provide free permits, which track usage but also display needed regulations & travel advice for patrons. The terrain is dynamic & it takes an experienced rider to safely navigate these mountains, which correlates to a need for reliable equipment such as snowmobiles & PPE. Not only does travel here require skill but it also takes a high level of avalanche education to be successful. The Bridgeport Avalanche Center is another important function of the BWRA. This symbiotic relationship allows for both public & ranger safety, by way of snowpack summaries & avalanche observations being published. At bridgeportavalanchecenter.org anyone can reference or contribute updated avalanche info that is particular to this region. The avalanche advisory is posted at the trailhead & on social media outlets, & is constantly interjected into public contacts. This season the BAC met all the necessary requirements to make it to the National Avalanche Centers website avalanche.org. With the publicity of the website this small avalanche center is looking to expand its audience, network, & geographic area. Only funding can allow for this to happen successfully. The benefit of putting out an avalanche bulletin compliments the educational gain of attending the free avalanche awareness clinics offered. At the two-day clinics one can obtain the knowledge to assess terrain & the dynamic snowpack conditions to make informed travel decisions. Three opportunities exist for attending such a session & the participants’ feedback has been very positive. This foundation of avalanche education can broaden ones perspectives of dangerous situations that may have been unbeknown prior. Sometimes referred to as a stepping-stone, these informative clinics get people to think about the unknowns, engage in the avalanche forecast, & retain the life-saving gear necessary. Emphasis on companion rescue is one of the main focal points & is exercised through multiple scenarios. The ground operations & educational components of running a safe & successful recreation program are restricted by funding. An inherent responsibility looms over the National Forest System to provide recreational opportunities while securing for public safety. It is a gargantuan task to accomplish these objectives & one that will demand financial support from the State of California OHV Grant. Please consider funding the recreation programs on the Bridgeport Ranger District. Ryan Lewthwaite - 4/2/2018


With an overactive contingent of recreationists on the National Forests, the need to support & fund programs that manage such functions are critical. With one of the largest public land areas in the lower 48 states, the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, is a huge resource with financial needs. Off Highway & Over Snow Vehicle recreation is growing in popularity, with the demand falling on the responsibility of the local forest rangers & their decomposing infrastructure. The California OHV grant is an essential cache of capital that could compliment the underfunded programs that people rely on for safety & enjoyment. In particular the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area, near Sonora Pass on the H-T National Forest, is such a program that could benefit from this financial allocation. Not only does this program protect natural resources & threatened wildlife, it allows for beneficial USMC training to be conducted on public land with permitted restrictions. The mostly snowmobile dominated recreation area has been a refuge for those backcountry travelers with expert skills & a desire to sled in an extreme alpine environment. This area is managed by only a few but supports the recreational opportunities for so many locals & those who travel here for this unique experience. The ground operations personnel at the BWRA have an overwhelming agenda. Not only do they patrol Wilderness boundaries & closures but they create areas where non-motorized Pacific Crest Trail thru-hikers can maintain their solitude. The forest rangers here check for CA OHV registrations & also provide free permits, which track usage but also display needed regulations & travel advice for patrons. The terrain is dynamic & it takes an experienced rider to safely navigate these mountains, which correlates to a need for reliable equipment such as snowmobiles & PPE. Not only does travel here require skill but it also takes a high level of avalanche education to be successful. The Bridgeport Avalanche Center is another important function of the BWRA. This symbiotic relationship allows for both public & ranger safety, by way of snowpack summaries & avalanche observations being published. At bridgeportavalanchecenter.org anyone can reference or contribute updated avalanche info that is particular to this region. The avalanche advisory is posted at the trailhead & on social media outlets, & is constantly interjected into public contacts. This season the BAC met all the necessary requirements to make it to the National Avalanche Centers website avalanche.org. With the publicity of the website this small avalanche center is looking to expand its audience, network, & geographic area. Only funding can allow for this to happen successfully. The benefit of putting out an avalanche bulletin compliments the educational gain of attending the free avalanche awareness clinics offered. At the two-day clinics one can obtain the knowledge to assess terrain & the dynamic snowpack conditions to make informed travel decisions. Three opportunities exist for attending such a session & the participants’ feedback has been very positive. This foundation of avalanche education can broaden ones perspectives of dangerous situations that may have been unbeknown prior. Sometimes referred to as a stepping-stone, these informative clinics get people to think about the unknowns, engage in the avalanche forecast, & retain the life-saving gear necessary. Emphasis on companion rescue is one of the main focal points & is exercised through multiple scenarios. The ground operations & educational components of running a safe & successful recreation program are restricted by funding. An inherent responsibility looms over the National Forest System to provide recreational opportunities while securing for public safety. It is a gargantuan task to accomplish these objectives & one that will demand financial support from the State of California OHV Grant. Please consider funding the recreation programs on the Bridgeport Ranger District. Ryan Lewthwaite - 4/2/2018


With an overactive contingent of recreationists on the National Forests, the need to support & fund programs that manage such functions are critical. With one of the largest public land areas in the lower 48 states, the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, is a huge resource with financial needs. Off Highway & Over Snow Vehicle recreation is growing in popularity, with the demand falling on the responsibility of the local forest rangers & their decomposing infrastructure. The California OHV grant is an essential cache of capital that could compliment the underfunded programs that people rely on for safety & enjoyment. In particular the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area, near Sonora Pass on the H-T National Forest, is such a program that could benefit from this financial allocation. Not only does this program protect natural resources & threatened wildlife, it allows for beneficial USMC training to be conducted on public land with permitted restrictions. The mostly snowmobile dominated recreation area has been a refuge for those backcountry travelers with expert skills & a desire to sled in an extreme alpine environment. This area is managed by only a few but supports the recreational opportunities for so many locals & those who travel here for this unique experience. The ground operations personnel at the BWRA have an overwhelming agenda. Not only do they patrol Wilderness boundaries & closures but they create areas where non-motorized Pacific Crest Trail thru-hikers can maintain their solitude. The forest rangers here check for CA OHV registrations & also provide free permits, which track usage but also display needed regulations & travel advice for patrons. The terrain is dynamic & it takes an experienced rider to safely navigate these mountains, which correlates to a need for reliable equipment such as snowmobiles & PPE. Not only does travel here require skill but it also takes a high level of avalanche education to be successful. The Bridgeport Avalanche Center is another important function of the BWRA. This symbiotic relationship allows for both public & ranger safety, by way of snowpack summaries & avalanche observations being published. At bridgeportavalanchecenter.org anyone can reference or contribute updated avalanche info that is particular to this region. The avalanche advisory is posted at the trailhead & on social media outlets, & is constantly interjected into public contacts. This season the BAC met all the necessary requirements to make it to the National Avalanche Centers website avalanche.org. With the publicity of the website this small avalanche center is looking to expand its audience, network, & geographic area. Only funding can allow for this to happen successfully. The benefit of putting out an avalanche bulletin compliments the educational gain of attending the free avalanche awareness clinics offered. At the two-day clinics one can obtain the knowledge to assess terrain & the dynamic snowpack conditions to make informed travel decisions. Three opportunities exist for attending such a session & the participants’ feedback has been very positive. This foundation of avalanche education can broaden ones perspectives of dangerous situations that may have been unbeknown prior. Sometimes referred to as a stepping-stone, these informative clinics get people to think about the unknowns, engage in the avalanche forecast, & retain the life-saving gear necessary. Emphasis on companion rescue is one of the main focal points & is exercised through multiple scenarios. The ground operations & educational components of running a safe & successful recreation program are restricted by funding. An inherent responsibility looms over the National Forest System to provide recreational opportunities while securing for public safety. It is a gargantuan task to accomplish these objectives & one that will demand financial support from the State of California OHV Grant. Please consider funding the recreation programs on the Bridgeport Ranger District. Ryan Lewthwaite - 4/2/2018


Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments in support of the Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest, Bridgeport Ranger District grant application to the California Department of State Parks, Off-Highway Vehicle Grants and Assistance Program for 2018-2019. The Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership is a coalition of organizations and individuals working toward the permanent protection of the Bodie Hills, an American treasure with exceptional scenic, historic, and recreational values. The northern portion of the Bodie Hills is part of the Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest, managed by the Bridgeport Ranger District (BRD). We feel that the Bodie Hills, a special and irreplaceable landscape, offer great values to residents and tourists alike in their lasting legacy as undisturbed and functioning open-space. We also feel that public education, such as that provided by the BRD for over-snow travel is important for visitors to have safe and enjoyable experiences on our public lands. We support the Bridgeport Ranger District vision and program to provide avalanche safety information and snowmobile specific avalanche awareness education to winter users of the area known as the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area (BWRA) for the 2018-2019 winter season. The (BWRA), located at Sonora Pass in California's Eastern Sierra Mountains is managed as a congressionally designated winter recreation area providing snowmobile access to extreme terrain; high peaks, deep drainages, steep chutes, wide-open cirques; which is coincidently, prime avalanche conditions. Avalanches occur routinely in the BWRA, and we support safe an informed visitation and appropriate recreation on our public lands. The grant application includes funds for avalanche personnel, website support and avalanche supplies. Thank you for your consideration of our comments and we hope the application is approved. Best, April Sall, Director Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership - 4/2/2018


To Whom it May Concern, Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments in support of the Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest, Bridgeport Ranger District grant application to the California Department of ,,,, Off-Highway Vehicle Program for 2018-2019. The Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership is a coalition of organizations and individuals working toward the permanent protection of the Bodie Hills, an American treasure with exceptional scenic, historic, and recreational values. The northern portion of the Bodie Hills is part of the Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest, managed by the Bridgeport Ranger District (BRD). We feel that the Bodie Hills, a special and irreplaceable landscape, offer great values to residents and tourists alike in their lasting legacy as undisturbed and functioning open-space. We also feel that public education, such as that provided by the BRD for over-snow travel is important for visitors to have safe and enjoyable experiences on our public lands. We support the Bridgeport Ranger District vision and program to provide avalanche safety information and snowmobile specific avalanche awareness education to winter users of the area known as the Bridgeport Winter Recreation Area (BWRA) for the 2018-2019 winter season. The (BWRA), located at Sonora Pass in California's Eastern Sierra Mountains is managed as a congressionally designated winter recreation area providing snowmobile access to extreme terrain; high peaks, deep drainages, steep chutes, wide-open cirques; which is coincidently, prime avalanche conditions. Avalanches occur routinely in the BWRA, and we support safe an informed visitation and appropriate recreation on our public lands. The grant application includes funds for avalanche personnel, website support and avalanche supplies. Thank you for your consideration of our comments and we hope the application is approved. Best, April Sall, Director Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership Bodie Hills Conservation Partnership - 4/2/2018


Road repair on the road from Coyote Flat to Big Pine has been neglected for years. The road provides ingress and egress from Coyote in case of fire. The road is also an existing loop except for the lack of maintenance. This repair should be added as a priority over other less important projects identified here. The reopening of the Peterson Mine road should also be a priority. That road in on INF maps as a 4wd road and should be reconsidered to open and remain open. The road has no erosion problems and has been used for decades until it was closed two years ago. There would be little to no cost to reopen this popular route. Randy Short - 3/16/2018


I have been camping at Glass Creek cpgd for the last 2 years. I ride UTVs on the road system in the between June Lake and Mammoth Lakes area. The main road system is in severe need of maintenance. The whoops are so bad my wife through her back out just traveling at slow speeds. The main access roads from the campgrounds need the most attention. The recreation experience is a -10. We will not come back until conditions improve. There were know signs of maintenance performed within the last 2 years. Please focus some of your maintenance activities on this area of your road system... Steve Cowdrey - 3/27/2018


The Inyo National Forest (INF) Project Administrator, Todd Ellsworth, did a nice job at the public Open House explaining the grant and responding to questions. There are a couple issues that can hopefully be improved upon. There have been several changes in personnel at the INF and the OHV community is optimistically looking forward to an improved relationship. 1. The first issue is the stream crossing repairs to Birch Creek. The grant application mislabeled the road # as 03E392 and the correct number is 30E302. This road and stream crossings are in relatively good condition and this is a very low priority repair. 2. The highest priority OHV trail repair is on the Coyote loop at the Onion Creek crossing, but it is not included int the grant request. This has become a major mud hole and virtually impassible. The CTUC map calls this loop "one of the premier riding experiences in the area". It attracts users from all over the State and therefore gets significant use. This creek crossing and meadow area has been in need of repairs for years but became very bad this last summer due to the high runoff. The area should be fixed ASAP. 3. The Pizona area is an important repair and falls in line after the Coyote loop. 4.The INF and Friends of the Inyo have spent approximately 21/2 million dollars in road restorations since the 2009 Travel Management Decision. Numerous closures are still being violated and much of that is due to the poor location. Does it make sense to put a barricade where the is no turnaround area? or in the middle of no place? It is time to re-evaluate some of the closure points. There have also been some legal roads that were mistakenly closed and why are there cherry stems but no roads in them? The INF Motorized Travel Management Record of Decision (ROD) said the INF will "continue the examination of the adequacy of the designated system of routes and recommend modifications or adjustments to the system to be addressed in subsequent decision documents "(pg.11). The ROD also states the INF will "continue working with collaborative groups interested in the management and implementation of the NFTS roads" (pg.11). It is time to implement these parts of the decision and re-examine the problem areas collaboratively. 5. The 2015/2016, the 2016/2017 and now the 2017/2018 OHMVR grant application, all three state "members of the ES4WD will assist the Forest in monitoring conditions of the system roads and trails, and help document the status of the routes considered low- or no use routes, using Trimble GPS units purchased previously through OHMVR grant funds". The Eastern Sierra 4 Wheel Drive Club (ES4WD) agreed to help but the INF never responded. Lets get together and make our trail system the best ever. I want the INF to get as many grants as possible. Forest Rec Officer Diana Pietrasanta and District Ranger Linda Riddle have been good to work with I think we can accomplish a lot going forward. Hopefully we can make some changes to this grant request and go full speed into 2018. Mike Johnston - 3/28/2018


I would really like to support the USFS-Inyo on there grant proposals. Some problem I have is that they don't seem to listen to our concerns that the public has in certain areas of the forest. I would really like to see the loop route repaired in Coyote Flats area (Sugarloaf). We keep bringing that area up in our discussions but seems to be at deaf ears. I hope they consider doing the repairs to that area. It is a big safety issue and will be until repaired. I hope someone doesn't have to be injured to get this area repaired. This area has a tremendous OHV use. Randy Gillespie - 4/1/2018


This request for funding should be approved. There is an overwhelming need for maintenance and repair of many (if not most) of the OHV trails in the INF. The high level of run off last year caused extensive damage throughout to INF and a number of trails have become all but impassable, even with the most capable 4x4 OHV’s. The proposed projects certainly warrant the requested funds, however, as noted by other commenters, the INF should consider repair of the Coyote loop at the Onion Creek crossing as a higher priority than the Birch Creek crossings in the Sand Canyon area. The Coyote loop road is effectively closed because of the quagmire at the base of a rather difficult pitch. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


To whom it may concern - I am writing on behalf of the 2,300 member Tahoe Rim Trail Association (TRTA). The TRTA is the U.S. Forest Service’s primary private partner in the management, maintenance and protection of the Tahoe Rim Trail (TRT) system. Thank you for this opportunity to comment on the LTBMU's OHV Ground Operations Grant Application. The TRTA would like to express its support for this grant application. While none of the TRT is open to motorized traffic the TRT and its 400,000 annual users would directly benefit from the increased funding requested in this grant application. This is because the trail is crossed by or in close proximity to a number of OHV trails in California managed by the LTBMU. It is not uncommon for the TRTA to receive complaints of motorized vehicles trespassing on the TRT or to observe resource damage on the trail that is clearly caused by such activity. The funding requested in this grant application would provide the LTBMU with the resources needed to properly manage OHV trails through additional maintenance, sign improvements and barrier installation. Those activities will help to keep OHV trail users on OHV trails and discourage their trespass on the TRT. The LTBMU has made an effort to assist the TRTA in our work to exclude motorized traffic from the TRT and the success of this grant application would allow them to implement the ideas we have discussed. Therefore we strongly encourage the full funding of this grant request. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on this grant application. Please contact me if I can be of further use in review of this application. Thank you, Chris Binder Director of Trail Operations Tahoe Rim Trail Association Chris Binder - 3/7/2018


I support the use of OHV funds for creating and maintaining motorized OHV recreational opportunities Stu Wik - 3/7/2018


United Trail Maintainers of California supports this Ground Operations grant for the Los Padres National Forest. We recognize significant improvements to the grant that will help OHV volunteers on the Mt. Pinos Ranger District to play a larger role in maintaining public trails. We appreciate the forest putting in everything that MPRD volunteers have asked be changed in the grant to support a productive maintenance program for MPRD. We are pleased to see Porterville Crew taken out as they are not usually available, the cost is too high and the work performed is not usually a good use of their time and the funding. We support the hiring of the Student Conservation Association (SCA) to perform general trail maintenance alongside OHV volunteers. This will result in less returned money to the division as is currently happening. What is lacking is a MOU between the OHV community and the Mt. Pinos District as requested by volunteers. This grant has components to support a volunteer proposed Plan of Work that has been submitted but not responded to by MPRD despite region attempts to mediate by helping with the formation of a MPRD Plan of Work and MOU. United Trail Maintainers of California - 3/24/2018


Comments on Los Padres OHV grant In general we support the Los Padres Ground Operations grant application. It includes critical funding for the Los Padres OHV trail system, including funding for many items requested by volunteers for items such as tools, supplies, and fuel and equipment maintenance. Although these comments reflect some of the challenges we face we are nevertheless grateful for the support provided by the Los Padres, which is operating under dire funding constraints that have decimated their developed recreation program. We provide these comments not to be critical, but to point out some of the problems that we have encountered that deserve solutions. In reviewing the overall application it is apparent that the funding requested is out of proportion to the OHV trail mileage in each district. The MPRD has requested approximately half as much funding as the SLRD despite having nearly double the mileage of OHV trails. The request appears to reflect district level support, volunteer support, and the effectiveness of each district in managing their OHV program rather than the amount of OHV opportunity. The amount of volunteer time spent for each district was similar despite there being almost twice the trail mileage on the MPRD, with the MPRD reporting approximately 793 hours and the SLRD reporting 891 hours for G15. This difference may be partially due to record keeping practices, volunteer recruitment, reporting and other factors. This difference is also reflected in Los Padres’ request for grant funds to support OHV work leaders, with the MPRD requesting approximately $19,000 and the SLRD requesting $64,000. In addition, grant funds are often returned unspent. In some cases there have been legitimate reasons for returning funds, such as crews not being available due to wildfires, poor conditions due to severe drought, but in other cases this has been due to poor planning. There is a narrow window during which soil moisture is sufficient for compaction in this semi arid area, and plans for work need to be in place well in advance to take advantage of good conditions. A major problem facing the Los Padres is the lack of available trail crews. It is commonplace for crews from the CCC, Cal Fire, and Porterville to make commitments for work during the maintenance season only to cancel at the last minute. To be effective crews require close supervision by leaders who understand trail work and can be on site. The Los Padres has very limited staff that is able to perform this function. Volunteers are often unavailable due to work commitments when crew work is scheduled with little advance notice. Grant funds have supported the use of mechanized trail crews on the Forest for the past several years. This is an effective alternative to using traditional trail crews that use only hand tools. Mechanized trail work is highly specialized and requires the use of small equipment. The Forest often uses fire crews with large dozers for trail maintenance, but this is inappropriate for anything other than roads and should not be used simply because they are available. In addition fire crews are frequently needed for their primary mission and are often unavailable for trail maintenance. We note that the Forest has requested $15,700 for fire this year and we hope they will be able to utilize this funding. Mechanized crews from the Forest Service Enterprise Unit have significantly improved trail conditions on the SLRD and should be used on other districts as well. But mechanized trail crews are a scarce commodity and must be scheduled over a year in advance. Due to scheduling difficulties the Enterprise unit and the Angeles mechanized unit frequently arrive when conditions are unfavorable. Work is often done when conditions are poor and whether or not it is actually needed. This can be detrimental to the trail system. Volunteers have obtained the qualifications necessary to perform mechanized maintenance but remain under utilized for a variety of reasons. It is clear that volunteer operators will need to play a larger role in performing mechanized trail maintenance. We look forward to working with the Los Padres and the OHV grants program in addressing the many challenges to maintaining the OHV trails on the Forest. It is only though a cooperative effort that we can have a successful program. Bruce Whitcher Central Coast Motorcycle Association bruce whitcher - 4/1/2018


Conservation Congress encourages any grant funding be directed to law enforcement (so that trespass and resource damage can be prosecuted), for installation of barriers to deter trespass in problem areas, and for restoration of damaged areas. Law enforcement and restoration should be the priorities for grant funding, not any new OHV route construction which is already plentiful, or even routine maintenance. What is lacking is enforcement and restoration. Conservation Congress - 3/7/2018


Given the severity of the dual crises facing life on Earth these days (global mass extinction and climate disruption), it is dumbfounding that a small minority group of privileged people continue to be granted so much control over so much land. It makes me ill to think that nearly a million dollars of Californian tax dollars go to support such a destructive and polluting fringe sport in the Mendocino Forest alone. From a purely logical stance rooted in seriously addressing the crises we face, these dollars should be used to eliminate OHVs, reforest the trails and roads, and hire local police departments to refuse USFS access to anyone carrying on OHV. It is definitely an indication of the era of post-truth when OHV use is touted as follows, per the application: "Fewer OHV funded personnel would result in limited public contacts and less public information and education, would likely lead to increased route proliferation, and potentially facility damage from lack of maintenance. Additionally, reduced funding would limit the Forest's ability to prevent incursions/trespass onto private property or closed areas such as wilderness." Not if you seek funding that is in alignment with the goals of the majority of the population like those I've suggested above! I can hear OHV boosters claiming all sorts of rights, and this is the problem. Rights for living communities of life are subordinate to the rights of individual humans. If these people actually were concerned about life on Earth, they wouldn't be drawn to such an abusive way to "experience wilderness." If OHV groups have enough money to bribe the forest service, BLM and the state to have access to public land, they can certainly pool their money and go buy their own land to destroy.Brien Brennan - 3/8/2018


This letter of support for Grant # G17-02-10-G01 is being submitted on behalf of the BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org (BRC), a national non-profit trail-based recreation group. BRC has reviewed the grant request and believes its size and scope is appropriate given the Mendocino National Forest manages – for both casual OHV use, touring, permitted events, and motorized access to non-motorized recreation - the largest destination Forest Service OHV area in California. This grant will provide critical funding to help support the Forest’s ongoing trail maintenance program where recreation staff and skilled operators keep the route network in compliance with related soil erosion and water quality standards. BRC commends the Forest’s ongoing volunteer program on both Ranger Districts where trail volunteers are utilized as a force multiplier to help maintain a high-quality designated road and trail network and associated camping and/or staging areas. Those trail volunteer efforts are also important to help in the care and management of the Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument. BRC also notes the agency’s effective use of signs, rider education, maps, enforcement, wet weather closures, trail delineators, and appropriate barriers (e.g. rocks, woody debris, fencing, etc.) as OHV management tools. Don Amador - 3/15/2018


The Mendocino National Forest is a very popular OHV area used by families and has been for years. This would be a good use of $$ form the OHV program and I would much rather see it go to the USFS folks who work the Mendocino OHV area who continue to strive to keep the area open for future generations to enjoy. "Other" outside 3rd parties that are requesting grants in other OHV areas only strive to ultimately shut down our California OHV areas by using our own funds against us. I support the Mendocino USFS Grant request 100%. Good people, I know many of them. Thank you and God bless. Jason - 3/16/2018


Conservation Congress encourages any grant funding be directed to law enforcement (so that trespass and resource damage can be prosecuted), for installation of barriers to deter trespass in problem areas, and for restoration of damaged areas. Law enforcement and restoration should be the priorities for grant funding, not any new OHV route construction which is already plentiful, or even routine maintenance. What is lacking is enforcement and restoration. Conservation Congress - 3/7/2018


Modoc County is in full support of this project. There are few snowmobile opportunities on the Modoc National Forest and it is important to maintain and upgrade Doorknob so it continues to provide good service for our snowmobiling public. This is a popular location, located near both the Lava Beds National Monument and Medicine Lake. Repairs for transportation components are hard to find and its important to have good access and parking for this facility. The Modoc National Forest has increased vacancies within its staff combined with an increased workload. The funding for the various specialists requested will allow the project to go forward as the current staffing doesn't have the available expertise. We urge the agency to fund this worthwhile project and continue to provide this important winter activity in a community with limited options during the snow months. Modoc County Natural Resources - 3/29/2018


Modoc County works closely with the Modoc National Forest on transportation issues. There are many county roads within the Forest which requires close coordination with the road crew and the engineer. The County has been working with the Forest on the Travel Management Policy for some time which includes both trails and non-system roads that are often used for OHV use. With this work comes a need for good signage that identifies which roads are available for use and which aren't. Good signage is also a critical safety issue with search and rescue. We are aware that road maintenance is a woefully underfunded component of the Forest budget and OHV trails are often at the bottom of that poorly funded priority. Lassen Creek is an extremely popular OHV area, both because of its prime location for camping and fishing, but because it also serves as the gateway to the Northern Warner Mountains. It is important to keep these trails serviceable. Without timely maintenance, the trails will fall into worse disrepair and require considerably larger funding amounts. Summer OHV recreation is an important part of our local economy and Lassen Creek is especially important to the small community economy of Davis Creek. Modoc County urges your consideration for funding this project. Modoc County Natural Resources - 3/29/2018


Modoc County has worked closely with the Modoc National Forest during their Travel Management Policy evaluation. It is important to the County that a strong OHV program exist on the Forest, but one that is compatible with sound resource protection. We support proper use of OHVs and rehabilitation and protection of areas that have suffered from improper OHV use. The Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee has previously funded resource work on Bald Mountain and support the proposal as outline in the grant application. There are sensitive riparian areas on Bald Mountain that, in places, are not compatible with OHV use. It is important that these areas be protected and rehabilitated. We urge the funding of this project. Modoc County Natural Resources - 3/29/2018


This area is amazing. I've only been here once but it's a hidden gem. Wilman Dea - 3/21/2018


As a mountain biker and motorcycle rider who uses the trails in this area, I support this grant and the Plumas National Forest's efforts on this grant anc activities. Kevin Sevier - 3/21/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC supports the need to protect resource areas such as meadows and wildland areas from encroachment by OHV users, and supports restoration efforts along these lines. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


I support this project as it is a great example of local government working with US Forest Service to maintain trails on the Plumas National Forest. The trail maintenance completed protects habitat and watersheds while keeping access to public lands open and safe. As Plumas County grows and diversifies its economy, these recreation based trails help bring visitors to the area while increases local's quality of life. Engaging the public and volunteers shows the support of the community for this project. Johnnie Smith - 3/30/2018


I support this project as it is a great example of local government working with US Forest Service to maintain trails on the Plumas National Forest. The trail maintenance completed protects habitat and watersheds while keeping access to public lands open and safe. As Plumas County grows and diversifies its economy, these recreation based trails help bring visitors to the area while increases local's quality of life. Engaging the public and volunteers shows the support of the community for this project. Nica Lorber - 3/30/2018


I support the Plumas National Forest, Mt Hough RD and their restoration project on Mt Hough. Over the last 5 years there have been significant increases in usage and trail mileage on the Mt Hough Trail System. Its great to see a compressive plan that includes recreation and restoration as combined focus. As a frequent user of the Mt Hough Trail System I appreciate that as sustainable routes are developed, unsustainable ones are decommissioned. Due to the light understory layer, user made trails are easily made but also cause havoc on the hillsides and watershed. It would be great to see this project funded so the trails that are designed to handled heavy use are available and the user made/unsustainable grade trails decommissioned. As a person who both rides and birds- I believe its important that while recreation use grows on the Mt Hough Trail System we protect what brought us to Mt Hough and Quincy in the first place. Michael Hall - 3/30/2018


I support the Plumas National Forest, Mt Hough RD and their restoration project on Mt Hough. Over the last 5 years there have been significant increases in usage and trail mileage on the Mt Hough Trail System. Its great to see the Plumas National Forest have a compressive plan that includes recreation and restoration as a combined focus. As a frequent (daily) user of the Mt Hough Trail System I appreciate that as sustainable routes are developed, unsustainable ones are decommissioned. Due to the light understory layer, user made trails are easily made but also cause havoc on the hillsides and watershed. It would be great to see this project funded so the trails that are designed to handled heavy use are available and the user made/unsustainable grade trails decommissioned. Amanda Beatty - 3/30/2018


This restoration grant will benefit these areas by restoring travel ways that are causing resource damage. By reducing the impact of resource damage, additional OHV routes in sustainable locations could then be constructed. Peter Hochrein - 3/30/2018


These routes should be closed to reduce their impact on important natural resources. With reduced impacts, additional sustainable OHV trails in these areas can then be constructed. Julie Hochrein - 3/30/2018


Thank you for the opportunity to comment.Im a 30 yr resident of this area and I just wanted to get my 2 cents in on how important I feel this and other projects of this kind are to our communities.when I first came to this area it was a vibrant and growing concern, logging was full speed ahead, mining was as well ,folks were moving to this beautiful area life was good.Over time we lost those ways of making a living and people had to move on to greener pastures.Now we have an opportunity through recreation to make this beautiful area vibrant and alive again . Our economy has a chance if only we embrace this opportunity and realize that recreation is our yellow brick road.I would ask that when you read these comment's please take the time to really understand how much good can come and how many live's you can impact. Thank you for your time marc cosbey - 3/31/2018


Looking at this grant one part bothers me. Staff-Forest Protection Officer sounds a lot like a law enforcement officer and should go in a LE grant instead of a restoration grant. Ed Stovin - 4/1/2018


This is a big grant, but it is for an area with a lot of miles of beautiful trails that have a lot of people using them. I love the ride from Highland on the south up to Big Bear, which I did twice last year. I like the ATV Dumpbed Trailer. It is way less expensive than the $47000 dump truck California City wants to buy and may do the same, just with more trips. The Sweco dozer is expensive, but can really help fix trails when the moisture is just right in the soil. I hope this can get funded to make more sustainable routes in the SBNF. Ed Stovin - 4/1/2018


$78,000 + dollars for even MORE of OUR GREEN STICKER FUNDS to facilitate their agenda. So... an upgrade to two OHV staging areas on the Front Country District? One being Baldy Mesa? OK, maybe THAT will benefit the OHV public-at-large (perhaps)! BUT... An upgrade to the Cranston OHV Work and Skill Development Course? This so-called Cranston Work Center is an isolated compound and NOT open to the OHV public-at-large. This center is SOLELY an outpost to the minions of secret-society "volunteers" ONLY !!! Unless this facility is opened up for use and training of ALL members of the public (both "VOLLEYS" and GENERAL PUBLIC alike), this should be flatly TURNED DOWN! I SAY NO TO DISCRIMINATION AND EXCLUSION OF THE OHV PUBLIC !!!! Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


Last year, it was $591,444 applied for by the San Bernardino National Forest… THIS YEAR, they are up to a whopping $699,314 (an increase of $108,000... WOW !!! So, once again, I see that within this O&M Grant, the SBNF is asking for $76,380 which is up from $68,541 just last year, for an Assistant OHV Program Manager with a mere $22,800 match from the USFS Fed Fund (up from $20,460 last year). This brings this person's salary up to $99,180 (up from $89,001 just last year) which would be absurdly high when compared to the salary being some $20,000 more than previously applied for funds for an actual OHV Program Manager just two years ago. Of course, they claim the acting OHV Manager is actually the Recreation Manager whom has historically been in charge of overseeing every other type of recreation OTHER THAN “Motorized OHV Recreation”. So, why so much for an assistant position? And are we STILL funding an OHV MANAGER in addition to an Assistant OHV MANAGER? Especially since they claim the OHV Manager is the Recreation Manager (comparatively little experience with OHV when accessed in relation to Senor Hoffman)! In years past, the applicant asked for just about $65,000 for the main OHV manager. Accountability should be paramount as I can see no reason an ASSISTANT position would demand such an exhorbanant salary! If the person who had been the acting (in name and in function) OHV MANAGER is in fact, now the Assistant OHV Manager (rhymes with “KAUFMANN”). Two years ago, the applicant asked for $20,000 for yet ANOTHER Polaris RZR UTV. There were already two (2) within the fleet which I have yet to see ANY OF THEM EVEN ONCE on the forest. This amount of $$$ could easily have funded two ATVs or maybe even three motorcycles. Why do the FPOs and LEOs need to travel in such extravagant comfort? Maybe a rite of passage, perhaps? If so, I submit not at the expense of OUR green sticker funds. Two more FPOs at a cost to US of over $90,000 that, per the SBNF description, ONLY patrol the Northern border adjacent to BLM lands??? AND piling on SO MANY other toppings to the pizza pie (HMP monitor, botanists, "wildlife" botanists, Arch monitor and ANOTHER archaeologist, hydrologist AND MORE)!!! So much frosting on the cake can only serve to hasten the onset of a DIABETIC COMA upon the body they claim to serve and protect !!! Two years ago, the applicant requested an allotment for a Road Maintenance Contractor (for green sticker routes) to the tune of $65,000... WOW!!! Last year, it was a WHOPPING $100,000 !!! FAST FORWARD TO THIS YEAR and now applying for same position to tune of $75,000… Such the Gausian Curve you selectively SURF with your WAVE OF WANTON DOLLAR DESIRE !!! The Adopt-A-Trail Program has over 48 active clubs with over 3000 active members with each club adopting a trail within the forest and THEY claim to be routinely doing MOST of the trail maintenance on their prospective trails. "These volunteers perform trail monitoring & maintenance (hand work) on Green Sticker routes and notify staff where mechanized work is necessary". 12,000 hours claimed two years ago at a proposed value of $331,080 (up from $322,000 a year prior = real dollars, not monopoly money). This year, it is $275,000 of REAL GREENBACKS !!! SO ... WHY the need to pay an outside (or inside) contractor? Have the Adopt-A-Trail clubs and their respective volunteers not been carrying their own weight lately? If so, no need for $90,000 to fund an assistant OHV Program Manager to manage the AAT volunteers when this forest says a route maintenance contractor is required to, let's say "take up the slack"! Money better spent on another deserving forest - spread the wealth - but not like Bernie Sanders proposed (He LOST - sorry, SNOWFLAKES - Suck it up, buttercups)! Now, I see that $15,000 is being requested for MC/ATV/Excavator/Trailer Maintenance (up from $10,000 last year… AGAIN, just like the year prior. This looks to be ONLY for service costs incurred by taking these vehicles to a dealership. IMPORTANT - This forest HAD at least one competent, manufacturer-certified mechanic who volunteered their time to the AAT program AND to SCMF diligently and selflessly for over 7+ years. The SBNF squandered and exploited this resource by way of (ahem... alleged) DISCRIMINATION & CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATIONS and NOW has repeatedly requested for this towering amount of funds for simple, routine maintenance... much of which can be completed 'in house' by one of the thousands of capable VOLUNTEERS at their disposal. Or maybe they've just 'scared' off the capable ones and are left to ask for OUR funds. I say cut this amount in HALF and utilize their considerable volunteer base for routine maintenance. SPREAD THE FUNDS THROUGHOUT OTHER MORE WORTHY APPLICANTS... THE GREED OF THE SBNF CAN OBVIOUSLY NOT BE QUENCHED. TURN OFF THE TAP !!! Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


SO... Over $855,000 applied for within a so-called 'restoration grant'. This is another attempt to fund "empty pockets" with OUR GREEN STICKER FUNDS in order to facilitate paid positions that do not directly benefit the OHV experience. YEAR AFTER YEAR, gov't agencies (and non-profits alike) look to the RESTORATION grants as a way to fully fund positions within their agencies and organizations that may not have funding (OR NEED) otherwise should this particular grant be made available to them. THE GREASY, GRUBBY HANDS ARE EAGERLY AWAITING AN ANSWER AND I SAY ... ENOUGH IS ENOUGH !!! Yet another covert effort by Eco-Activists masquerading as OHV-friendly gov't officials to CLOSE EACH AND EVERY OHV TRAIL... ONE BY ONE !!! That being said, I see this exhorbanent amount OVER THE TOP. This money would be better spent elsewhere upon public lands which employ personnel more receptive to volunteer interaction and public involvement. Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


United Trail Maintainers of California supports the Sequoia NF Ground Operations Grant proposal. Sequoia National Forest has a strong relationship with its OHV partners and has maintained a quality system of trails to standards for many years in collaboration with its community of volunteers. United Trail Maintainers of California - 3/24/2018


Conservation Congress encourages any grant funding be directed to law enforcement (so that trespass and resource damage can be prosecuted), for installation of barriers to deter trespass in problem areas, and for restoration of damaged areas. Law enforcement and restoration should be the priorities for grant funding, not any new OHV route construction which is already plentiful, or even routine maintenance. What is lacking is enforcement and restoration. Conservation Congress - 3/7/2018


Please see attached document. Michael C. Mitchell - 3/31/2018


I'm submitting public comments in support of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest Maintenance, Operations and Patrolling. This winter the snowmobile community, in our area, was provided daily up to date information about riding and avalanche conditions. This was a pleasant surprise. In past years our snowmobile club operated a website. This website was only updated when information was provided to our club president, and rarely did it ever contain avalanche conditions. Throughout this winter, snowmobilers were able to access, not only avalanche conditions, but also riding conditions for a variety of areas. In the past we were only given snow park conditions, but this season, on the Shasta Avalanche website, we were provided snow park conditions and specific information about riding conditions in various areas. My hope is to see this continue for years to come. Kale Riccomini - 4/2/2018


I wish to see all motorized trails/roads/areas remain open and maintained, as this provides the public with an amazing opportunity to view nature, find ourselves, and challenge Man Vs. Machine Vs. nature's elements. I am On OHV user, and I also do volunteer trail maintenance in areas including Kern River Ranger District and Los Padres National Forest. I hope these Grants/Funds are put to good use, and volunteers are utilized accordingly. If possible, could a Website Developer be used as part of the OHV grant? Hard paper maps are great, but in the 21st century, online/PDF maps are much more practical ! just a thought. Thanks for all your hard work! Sean Riener - 3/10/2018


I'm writing in favor and in support of the Sierra National Forest receiving this grant. The funding has been cut and cut over the years. Their operating budget is not enough to sustain the OHV Program. The community of OHV Enthusiasts who access the SNF trails need the forest service and their management of the SNF. The SNF need as much help as possible for road and trail maintenance. Much work is needed to insure that legal OHV trails and forest roads are kept open for public OHV use and to reduce potential adverse conditions. The continued reduction of the Forest Service road and trail maintenance budget has caused roads and trails to deteriorate to an unacceptable condition. Lack of proper maintenance has led to drainage structure failure and water quality degradation. Brush encroachment and downed trees on some roads and trails has begun to restrict motorized access and use. Many of these roads and trails provide access to and from developed campgrounds, dispersed camping areas, and recreational destination points. This work activity will be focused on roads and trails that provide a variety of motorized uses. Trails provide varied levels of difficulty from easy, to difficult, to more difficult. This project will improve motorized access, water quality, signage, and enhance the overall OHV experience within the SNF. Michael McGarity - 3/27/2018


Our non-profit organization — the Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center (CSERC) -- recognizes the staffing and resource challenges that the Forest Service faces in managing OHV and OSV use on the Stanislaus National Forest. For this reason, CSERC provides our Center’s general support for the grant application proposal that has been submitted by the Stanislaus Forest to fund operations and maintenance, purchase needed supplies and equipment, and to otherwise manage the Forest Service's OHV and OSV program in the Stanislaus Forest. John Buckley - 3/9/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org has reviewed Ground Operations Grant # G17-02-19-G01 and Safety and Education Grant # G17-02-19-S01 and strongly supports both proposals. The Stanislaus NF’s OHV/OSV programs have one of the largest partnership efforts in Region 5. BRC commends the Forest’s ongoing efforts to maximize its OHV/OSV management efforts via partnerships with the following non-profit organizations and clubs including, but not limited to, the Merced Dirt Riders, OutKast Jeepers, 4x4 in Motion, Tri-County Off-Road Vehicle Club, Stanislaus NF Trail Riders, Stewards of the Stanislaus, and Sonora Posse. BRC appreciates the Forest’s ongoing efforts to protect natural and cultural resources while still providing for a high-quality OHV recreation experience. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/22/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. A long-term partner with the Stanislaus Nation Forest, we attended their open house on this grant opportunity to provide input and to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to California residents. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. A long-term partner with the Stanislaus Nation Forest, we attended their open house on this grant opportunity to provide input and to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to California residents. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. A long-term partner with the Stanislaus Nation Forest, we attended their open house on this grant opportunity to provide input and to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to California residents. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


Waste of OHV funds, could be put to better use maintaining and adding to the existing legal OHV single track. I oppose the use of OHV funds to close this area Stu Wik - 3/7/2018


I support this grant application. I would like to see maintenance and the ground work described in the application to continue. Dennis Davenport - 3/16/2018


I support this grant application. I would like to see maintenance and the ground work described in the application to continue. Dennis Davenport - 3/16/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org has reviewed Restoration Grant # G17-02-20-R01 and has the following comments and suggestions. BRC is generally supportive of restoration grants which are an important element of the CA OHV Grant Program. However, BRC is concerned that the proposal to obliterate and block approximately 30 miles of user-created unauthorized routes may preclude any of those routes from consideration in ongoing (or future) post subpart B travel planning efforts --- such as G15-02-20-P05 which seeks to analyze unauthorized or new routes for possible designation as OHV single-track trail opportunities in or near the restoration grant project area. BRC also suggests that the agency engage with local OHV clubs to ground-truth those 30 miles of routes for environmental impacts and/or potential for inclusion in the area’s designated road and trail network. BRC appreciates the Forest’s enhanced efforts to both protect natural resources and provide sustainable OHV recreation in the Truckee area. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/21/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org has reviewed Ground Operation Grant # G17-02-20-G01 and stands in strong support of the proposal. BRC commends the Tahoe NF for its ongoing efforts to provide high-quality sustainable OHV recreation on a substantive network of designated roads, trails, and areas. BRC supports various tenets of the grant including, but not limited to, purchase of a mini-excavator on the ARRD, ongoing wet weather soil testing on trails which may allow for additional riding opportunities, and use of many partnerships including trail work performed by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship organization. Also, those partnerships include many outstanding volunteer trail projects done by local OHV clubs. BRC suggests that the Forest allocate grant funds to Districts and programs based on a decision-matrix that includes soil moisture studies and/or implementation of management prescriptions which may allow for OHV use during dry periods in the winter, conversion of roads to trails, creating new OHV trail opportunities including looped routes, connectivity for green-sticker vehicles, quality of trail experience or challenge, and use of partnerships as force-multipliers. Again, BRC appreciates the Forest’s commitment to provide high-quality sustainable OHV recreation for residents of California and tourists who appreciate motorized opportunities in the project area. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/22/2018


Please fund this grant to support quality maintenance of a world renowned OHV trail system. Peter Hochrein - 3/30/2018


It is difficult to provide informed comments on this project without more information. There isn't anything noticed on the TNF SOPA or the other usual sources and no maps are included. We are aware that many trails on the TNF were closed following Travel Management, and that some did not receive much analysis due to the short time frame and lack of resources available. That said, the TNF has one of the strongest OHV programs in California, and has accomplished significant amounts of work on their system post Travel Management. In general we have supported their past projects. This project states that it will obliterate 30 miles of previously closed trail, an area of 7 acres, but this seems misleading because it probably represents the total surface area restored, and the trails undoubtedly occupy much more than a 7 acre area. Although we are encouraged by the statement that the area will be evaluated for future single track trails, there is a history of broken promises made during Travel Management that leaves us skeptical of such statements We look forward to commenting on this project further once the Forest Service documents become available. Central Cost Motorcycle Association bruce whitcher - 4/1/2018


US FOREST PATROL DISTRICTS

The Inyo National Forest law enforcement personnel have worked well with the OHV community. Like any public lands user group, there are individuals that violate rules due to lack of knowledge or malice behavior. Due to the large number of roads, and many times lack of signage, it is important to have the personnel needed to stem unlawful activities and thereby protect our access to the backcountry. I fully support this grant request and look forward to continued relations with the INF law enforcement personnel. Mike Johnston President Eastern Sierra 4x4 Club Mike Johnston - 3/26/2018


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. It is general knowledge in our area that there are very few Law Enforcement officers patrolling our public lands. While the vast majority of OHV users obey the regulations and respect our public lands, there are those few that do not. The people that violate protective laws on our public lands need to know that Law Enforcement is out there and that they may be caught and prosecuted. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help. Pat Woods - 4/2/2018


This proposal should be approved and funded fully. As pointed out by the INF there is a minimal law enforcement presence in the forest which is even less on week-ends and holidays. There is an acute need for better education on what is legal and appropriate OHV use and what is not. More FPO's would help this situation as well as LEO's to assure that closed areas are not improperly used or accessed. Unfortunately it is the few illegal users that seem to establish the reputation of all OHV users. An increase in law enforcement would be beneficial of all the INF users. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC)) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is supportive of law enforcement grants and related activities on OHV utilized public lands, and of the need for equipment designed to effectively traverse these challenging roads and trails. Most importantly, the LUCC would like to see increased OHV patrols during holiday and weekend late afternoons and nights to minimize incidents of resource damage. Also, since there is a fair amount of resource damage that occurs when wheeled vehicles go off road in limited snow cover, perhaps a snow patrol would be advised. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


We appreciate the role that the Patrol District plays in enforcing laws and regulations on the Los Padres. The Los Padres is a very large Forest and presents an enforcement challenge. It is an unfortunate fact that off trail vehicle use is a significant problem on the Forest. The amount of off trail use appears to be in proportion to the amount of public use of the Forest, with larger areas such as the MPRD having proportionally more trespass. In addition OHV use is difficult to enforce due to its transient nature. It seems that the significant effort necessary to carry out enforcement against a relatively small number of transgressors doesn't provide much incentive to make this a priority. Perhaps the patrol district could enlist a high tech approach to conduct at least minimal spot enforcement in problem areas. The perception among the public is that currently there is almost no enforcement presence at all and that illegal use will go unpunished . I am concerned because this causes environmental damage that reflects poorly on the majority of the OHV community who obey the rules. This community does what it can to increase awareness of the problem, but in the end is reliant on the law enforcement agencies to carry out enforcement. bruce whitcher - 4/1/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is supportive of law enforcement grants and related activities on OHV utilized roads and public lands, and of the need for equipment designed to effectively traverse these challenging roads and trails. Most importantly, the FAC would like to see increased OHV patrols during holiday and weekend late afternoons and nights to minimize incidents of resource damage. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. A long-term partner with the Stanislaus Nation Forest, we attended their open house on this grant opportunity to provide input and to offer our help and support of the Forest’s efforts to continue to provide these recreational opportunities to California residents. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


CITIES AND COUNTIES

CITIES

I read your grant and most of it looks fine, but there is one part I am not sure of. Its about the dump truck. $47800 is a lot of grant money for a truck that I don't believe will get used much. I have read hundreds of grant requests and can't remember anyone asking for a dump truck. I would think most earth moving work in ground operations would be fixing roads or smoothing out parking areas. Can you rent a dump truck when you really read it? Then you wouldn't have to maintain or store it. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


We would like to express our full support for the City of El Centro's application for the Education and Safety Project. The students attending school in el Centro elementary School District will benefit greatly providing safe avanues for recreation and development of skills that will prepare them to becme responsible and productive citizens. The students who are actually involved in programs such as NYPUM (National youth Project Using Minibikes) have improve school attendance and behavior by more than 20%. We believe in a strong communication and collaboration for the beter of our youth. Celina Gonzalez - 3/19/2018


I have been a TSS (Track Safety Supervisor) for the El Centro NYPUM program for about two years. Before then I was a volunteer. Looking back to before I joined I had no real interest much less any real concerns for getting to know anything about our desert. Today I see it as such a beautiful opportunity for not only our youth, but for everyone to get to know our own backyard. Being introduced to this program has allowed me to see our hometown and desert in a new perspective. I had no idea of all the amazing experiences you could embark on while out in the desert, whether it be camping or going out riding. I joined about 2-3 years ago because my younger brother and cousin needed something else to do other than your everyday sports and videogames to entertain them. They needed a change of scenery and although I didn't know it at the time, my sister and I both needed it as well. Starting off in the program I was very worried about how hard it was going to be and honestly about how dirty it would be to play around in the dirt all day. Today, the dirt is my friend. The desert is my home and through this program I have learned to appreciate it as well as care for it. Before my family and I were involved with NYPUM, we would spend all our time on the phone, computer, or videogames. Getting out of my comfort zone and participating in learning how to ride a motorbike and take it apart has given me this deep appreciation and realization that there is way more to being involved with not only your community, but your family as well. I'm grateful that the city had this program otherwise I honestly don't know if I could appreciate the desert, my home, the way I do now. Joining NYPUM with my family was the best thing that could have ever happened to not only myself, but for all of my family. We built bonds not only with the other participants of this program, but strengthened our own as well. We learned to communicate better with one another and spend way much more time outside. I have seen how much all of the participants in this program have grown. I hope you consider our program for funding. Marissa - El Centro NYPUM Track Safety Supervisor Marissa Hernandez - 3/19/2018


Our Community has limited programs for our youth. NYPUM is a program that has been an absolutely positive experience for all of its your members. Pat Ureña is an amazing role model for the kids and a tireless advocate for them and the program. Thanks to this program a lot of children have an opportunity to engage in activities that they would otherwise not be able to engage in due to lack of money and adult leadership. I have had the pleasure to witness the positive interaction between Pat, parents, and students. The students are able to learn and simultaneously strengthen their self-esteem through hands on training. I hope that this program continues for a long time because loosing such a program would definitely be a detriment to our community. Monica Lepe-Negrete - 3/19/2018


The City of El Centro has been offering this program that gives our underserved youth the opportunity to ride our great desert. My son has been involved helping with the program because he is an avid desert rider and he's been riding since 5 years old. I work in another department with the city but seen how these kids enjoy working on the motorcycles and have been busy with community projects. It gives our kids a chance to see our desert and without this program it might not ever give them this chance to see the beauty of the desert and the dunes! Please consider them for this grant they can surely use it!! Mike Reed - 3/19/2018


I am writing this comment in support of the El Centro NYPUM program. The program helps merge these young kids with outside agencies such as our International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 569 to talk about careers in the area of electricity, carpentry and other possibilities. I have been fortunate enough to work with some of these young kids to teach them how to use tools of the trade and how to use their minds to create and build things. Teaching these kids tool identification so they can properly remove a carburetor and reinstall it properly. Teaching kids how to use their hands is so important in this program. It also teaches them responsibility. Very impressed with this group of kids and their interest in the outdoors. Hope you consider this program! Dan Machain IBEW 569 Dan Machain - 3/21/2018


I have been involved with the NYPUM Program for about a few months and till this day, it still amazes me how there is a program for young kids to do something other than the usual sports and from them being inside all day. When I first became involved with NYPUM, I had no idea how to ride a Mini-Bike (Dirt bike) nor did I ever think I could. I honestly never heard of NYPUM until one of the Members asked me to check it out since I love working with mechanics. After that, I put in as many volunteer hours as I could put down. I wanted to be a part of this program. Teaching our youth how to respect the desert as well as to have fun in the area around you is just wonderful. This is a program in which not only do they focus on the desert but they focus on family values and giving back to the community. NYPUM is definitely a program I would recommend every child along with everyone else to become a part of . I am still currently a volunteer on my way to becoming a Track Safety Supervisor (TSS), for this program. NYPUM has inspired me to not only work with kids but to give back to my community and to appreciate the environment around me. I hope you consider to fund this program so that it may continue not only to help our Youth to grow, but also allow us to educate and inspire our community. Jose Fajardo - 3/20/2018


My son has been a part of the NYPUM program for about 3 years and enjoys every moment of it. The moment he joined, he has been setting achievable goals in school and has been spending more time with his family. He has learned so much through this program, from learning about dirt bikes, to the environment around him. The most important thing he has learned in NYPUM is to give back to our community. This program has not only greatly benefitted my son, but all of the other children in the program as well. I highly encourage you to fund this program so that more kids have the opportunity to not only learn, but to have fun while supporting our community and respecting our environment. diana aguilar - 3/22/2018


Dear OHV, I am the Chief Mechanic at the City Shop for the City of El Centro and I just wanted to say that the El Centro NYPUM program offers our kids a great opportunity to learn the mechanics of the motorcycle. I have worked with some of these kids and staff and I think this is a wonderful program for the kids and parents. Hope you consider them. Sincerely, Alex Cortez - 3/21/2018


I've had the opportunity to work closely with City of El Centro Community Services in the past 8 years. As the executive director of the Imperial County Sheriff's Activities League I have reached out on several occasions to the Community Services to work together on youth sports and activities. During this time, I have seen the staff work well with the youth, making each opportunity a learning experience. They are taught responsibility, working well with others, and inclusion with special needs youth. Sandy Liera - 3/26/2018


I have had the pleasure of working with the City of El Centro Community Services with their NYPUM program and various other youth programs. This past year, I had the distinct honor of traveling to the Rose Bowl with the NYPUM program. They learn far more than just about how to ride a motorcycle. They learn about responsibility, respect for the laws, teamwork and sportsmanship. The El Centro Community Services would be very deserving of this grant to help further their efforts to provide much needed services to the youth in a community that is severely lacking in youth activities. Tina Garcia - 3/26/2018


The American Red Cross Imperial Valley Service Center is eager to see that this grant materializes for the City of El Centro Community Services NYPUM Program. We have had the privilege of seeing this program grow within our community, whose close proximity to the Desert makes for a perfect match. The NYPUM program offers the opportunity to our children who may not otherwise have the experienced the chance to learn to operate, observe and engage in the sport of Desert Trail Riding in a safe manner - respecting, learning desert/equipment safety and the environment that hosts this fantastic activity. I am encouraged to have had the opportunity to see some of the youngsters turn out to be community leaders in the seventeen years I have served as Manager of the Red Cross office. The program's facet of Safety and Respect engage the youth's molding to be responsible and confident citizens. This grant is an opportunity to help our locally under-served youth participate in a sport activity that may otherwise be out of their financial reach. We are proud to support and comment on the grant process the City of El Centro Community Services is pursuing and we are so encouraged to see that the children are also receiving First Aid, CPR and Heat Safety as part of their training. Bravo, OHMV and City of El Centro! Sylvia Preciado-Platero, Manager Imperial Valley Service Center American Red Cross of San Diego/Imperial Counties Chapter Sylvia Preciado-Platero - 3/28/2018


This is a great program of which there are not near enough of. I wish I could have done this when I was 8! I hope this program can be fully funded to help these great kids have a little fun. I spoke with Patricia at the dunes cleanup and it's great to see her doing positive things in our little world. Good luck Patricia and welcome to the commission. I'm sure you will do a fine job. Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


I think NYPUM is an amazing program especially for my son Brandon who was diagnosed with Autism. Its been extremely helpful with his dexterity and helped him focused better. Its been amazing for us to see him ride this motorcycle safely and to be able to take apart and put together a carburetor. He wants to continue riding and get better at it and he keep progressing in his motorcycle skills. His doctors are saying taking that taking apart the carburetor is going to be great for him. He enjoys the outdoors and super enthused when he rides with his new friends. Hope you can consider this program it has done so much for our son. Adolph and Araceli Prieto - 4/2/2018


I think NYPUM is an amazing program especially for my son Brandon who was diagnosed with Autism. Its been extremely helpful with his dexterity and helped him focused better. Its been amazing for us to see him ride this motorcycle safely and to be able to take apart and put together a carburetor. He wants to continue riding and get better at it and he keep progressing in his motorcycle skills. His doctors are saying taking that taking apart the carburetor is going to be great for him. He enjoys the outdoors and super enthused when he rides with his new friends. Hope you can consider this program it has done so much for our son. Adolph and Araceli Prieto - 4/2/2018


If you could spend half a day with the City of El Centro NYPUM kids, you would see the life changing impacts this program has on a particularly vulnerable population. We are a rural, geographically isolated community with tough economic challenges, including an unemployment rate that fluctuates between 16 to 23%. Our NYPUM program provides a unique outdoor recreational opportunity that would not otherwise be available to our kids. NYPUM gets kids off the sofa and away from their video games to enjoy the beauty of our desert. NYPUM teaches responsibility, leadership, collaboration, and lifelong recreation skills. El Centro has successfully collaborated with American Honda and the Imperial County Probation Department to open the program to as many of our kids as possible. This grant funding will ensure we can continue to reach students who are motivated to do well in school because the reward is a really fun ride in the desert with friends. Cheryl Viegas Walker, Mayor, El Centro Cheryl Viegas Walker - 4/2/2018


We feel that the support for equipment and training that this grant would provide are necessary and vital to the safety of the patrolling officers, and ultimately for the general public in Hesperia. We feel that this is a valid use of California tax dollars, and fully support and encourage the award of this grant. - Competetive Edge MX Park Mark - 3/28/2018


We feel that the support for equipment and training that this grant would provide are necessary and vital to the safety of the patrolling officers, and ultimately for the general public in Hesperia. We feel that this is a valid use of California tax dollars, and fully support and encourage the award of this grant. - Competitive Edge MX Park Mark - 3/28/2018


test. Crystal - 3/23/2018


Although I love the idea to help the kids from Los Angeles, and introduce them to an OHV experience, the labor costs seem way out of line. Why does the grant need to pay overtime for all of these workers? I would think that for almost $163,000 we could run a much larger program using OHV specialists and more volunteers. Out of the $178,000 grant, only $3,450 is in direct support of the kids. Seems way out of proportion. Also, I'm not aware of any OHV riding areas in the City of Los Angeles, but maybe I'm missing something. Aimee Harrison - 3/31/2018


First, I wonder why the safety education grant is not shown in the general application requirements? I have seen grants missing elsewhere also. I love the minibike program and hope it can be successful. Is this in conjunction with El Centro? I don't see Patricia in the general application requirements. Anyway, good luck and I hope your kids have a lot of fun. Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


I would like to comment on the LAPD, Education and Safety OHV grant application evaluation criteria. My suggestions are: Question 4- The applicant should explain how NYPUM will participate in this project. Question 6- I think the applicant forgot to explain how the public was notified about the meeting listed. They also forgot to explain how the identified stakeholders are stakeholders in this project. Question 7- I think the applicant should number the parts of the narrative that support the selections and revise their answers. Question 8- I think the applicant should explain how the “Interpretive talks, rides, events” selection is relative to the project. Question 9- I think the applicant’s narrative only supports the “1,000 to 10,000” selection. They should add to the explanation to support the “Greater than 10,000” selection. Question 10- The narrative does not state whether or not the participants will receive MSF certification at the conclusion of the training. Thank you for considering my comments. Jon Baker - 4/1/2018


After reviewing the Law Enforcement document G17-03-46-L01, my comment is that I concur with the requirement for the Ridgecrest Police Department to continue patrolling the desert areas within the city and the unincorporated desert areas that border the city limits. I have personally witnessed dangerous/illegal behavior occurring in these areas over the last twenty years I have lived here. I think that the support equipment and training that this grant would provide are necessary and vital to the safety of the patrolling officers, and ultimately for the general public in these areas. The issues remain not only with the seasonal influx of desert off road vehicle users, but year round with the local riders as well. In the interest of the public's safety and well being, I feel that this is a valid use of California tax dollars, and fully support and encourage the award of this grant. Jennie Norris - 3/7/2018


I have owned a home in Ridgecrest for 38 years. My grandchildren and great grandchildren who frequently visit me are OHV enthusiasts. After reviewing the grant proposal in Project Number G16-03-46-L01 I fully concur with the request and recommend approval. The proposal is complete, concise and very well written. Brian E. Immings, Sr. - 3/17/2018


I have owned a home in Ridgecrest for 38 years. My grandchildren and great grandchildren who frequently visit me are OHV enthusiasts. After reviewing the grant proposal in Project Number G16-03-46-L01 I fully concur with the request and recommend approval. The proposal is complete, concise and very well written. Barton E. Immings Sr. - 3/17/2018


I disagree with the Ridgecrest Police Department application. There are no legal OHV opportunities within the Ridgecrest city limits. OHV use within Ridgecrest is banned by city ordinance. The legal OHV opportunities just outside the city limits fall under the jurisdiction of the BLM Ridgecrest office and the Kern County Sheriff. On a daily basis the Ridgecrest Police Department turns a blind eye to illegal OHV activities in the city. Illegal OHV use on property the city owns occurs on a daily basis and is not enforced despite the city ordinance unless a complaint is made. The BLM office in Ridgecrest and the Kern County Sheriff has an actual need for these funds, not the City of Ridgecrest. Unfortunately your organization doesn't believe in checks and balances or any accountability to the taxpayers of California. You grant some money to any organization that applies and are not concerned with the facts, or lies the applying agency tells. Please send more money to the city of Ridgecrest again to put in their "general fund" to be used on anything but OHV. Thanks for letting me vent the truth and be ignored. J. Davis - 3/30/2018


This Planning Grant is an excellent use of the OHMVR grant funds. The Town of Mammoth Lakes is a hub for recreation and they have recognized the need to adequately plan for the growing use of OHVs in this area. I wish other towns in our area would do this. The Eastern Sierra 4x4 Club gets numerous request throughout the years about where to go in the Mammoth area. I suggest the Town get input from additional user groups such as Adventure Trails, Eastern Sierra 4x4 and CORVA. Mike Johnston - 3/21/2018


The request of funding for planning should be approved. Future use and enjoyment of the recreational opportunities would be enhanced by approval of this grant request. Comprehensive planning is essential to the identification, development, and management of existing and new OHV and non-OHV recreational opportunities in the Mammoth Lakes areas. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


COUNTIES

until we see Alameda County support the Carnegie Expansion publicly so legal ohv people can use already purchased state property then no money should go to Alameda county Edward Santin - 3/17/2018


The Alpine Watershed Group (AWG) supports the Alpine County Sheriff Department’s 2017/18 OHMVR grant application. In June 2017, AWG finished working under an OHMVR grant to provide ecological restoration to habitats damaged by out-of-bounds OHV use in sensitive, streamside areas of the East Fork Carson River in Alpine County. Funding provided to the Alpine County Sheriff’s Department can benefit our OHMVR restoration projects. As stated in the grant application, the Alpine County Sheriff Department’s enhanced law enforcement efforts would not only help ensure the protection of this restoration work, but would also reduce future impact to the sensitive riparian habitats. In our support letter for the Alpine County Sheriff’s Department’s application last year, AWG encouraged the Sheriff to include the East Fork Carson hot springs as a priority enforcement area and apply for additional staff funding for enforcement at and along access to the hot springs. AWG was happy to see that this year’s application does request more funding for staff and overtime. Even though the East Fork Carson Hot Springs are not specified as a priority area in this application, we encourage the Sheriff’s Department to use some of that time to work with the US Forest Service to increase patrols at the hot springs as well as our recently restored sites along the East Fork Carson where it parallels Highway 89/4. This is particularly important at the Hot Springs after the river drops during the summer – the Forest Service has more trouble accessing the site by land than the Sheriff might, and more vehicles attempt to cross the river causing serious ecosystem damage. AWG supports the Alpine County Sheriff’s Department grant application and its ability to encourage low impact and sustainable OHV use. AWG looks forward to working with the Sheriff’s Department to explore collaborative opportunities around public education, including outreach to OHV clubs and local schools. AWG also encourages the Sheriff’s Department to let us know if they see or hear of ecosystem damage caused by improper OHV use. We hope that you will support this important funding request. Gavin Feiger - 3/22/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is supportive of law enforcement grants and related activities on OHV utilized roads, trails and public lands, and of the need for equipment designed to effectively traverse these areas during the winter snow season. The LUCC supports the need for increased staff hours to patrol OHV and OSV areas, and is especially concerned with law enforcement presence during OHV peak use times (weekends and holidays, especially late afternoon and nights) to prevent resource damage on public lands. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is strongly supportive of this grant application and the vital need for the purchase of the snowmobiles and related safety equipment to better enable safe access to snow covered areas in the local OHV areas for the Butte County Search and Rescue units. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


As a resident of the Low Divide OHV area in Del Norte county, I support this project. Any improvements to OHV access will help to better our economy by encouraging more forest recreation tourism. This has long been an important part life on the north coast. Thank you! Jesse Davis - 3/7/2018


This is a public comment on the grant proposal to enhance off-highway motor vehicle recreation on National Forest Services lands. I found this information seeking public input in the Daily Triplicate in Crescent City. My comment is: Off Highway Motor Vehicles do not belong in the National Forests, which are used by visitors and non-motorized recreationists, such as hikers, campers, fishermen, wildlife watchers and others. These are often tourists who come to our Six River counties, and spend tourist dollars to escape noise and pollution, and seek the beauty and quiet of nature. Marcia - 3/20/2018


I support this grant application. I think it would be very beneficial to the SO and volunteers to have the necessary personal protective equipment to ensure their safety while giving them the ability to help with locating missing and injured publics. Lisa Dailey - 3/14/2018


This sounds like a reasonable request from the SO. Saftey of volunteers and officers is paramount in reacue operations. Jacob Jahnke - 3/14/2018


As a volunteer member of Shasta County Sheriff's Search and Rescue Snowmobile Team I strongly support this proposal. Our team responds to victims lost and/or stranded in remote winter areas. Often we operate in areas of potential avalanche threat in some areas of Shasta County as well as occasional mutual aid incidents in the north state. Quality personal protection equipment is paramount to our members safety. Avalanche beacons, probes, shovels and hi-visibility winter safety jackets will greatly improve our team's ability to respond to often dangerous winter condition incidents. Other SAR teams benefiting are Mountain Rescue, Ground Search, and Motorized (UTV/ATV/Jeep Patrol) who may also respond to search and/or assist in victim recovery as well as responding deputies. Thank you for your consideration in this grant proposal Ron Keown Ron Keown - 3/14/2018


Shasta county has a great program for OHV. please support their efforts to make it better Edward Santin - 3/17/2018


shasta law enforcement has a great program to keep OHV going forward Edward Santin - 3/17/2018


I would like to comment on the El Dorado County CAO’s General grant application. I believe that the applicant made some errors and omissions in the Evaluation section: 4- The applicant should provide a date for the reference document. 11b- The applicant should revise the narrative to better explain the specific applicant and/or Land Manager initiated educational events to support the selection. Applicant should also note that the instructions to this section state to “Count only organized, scheduled events; do not include routine visitor contacts.” Thank you for considering my comments. Jon Baker - 4/1/2018


I would like to comment on the El Dorado County CAO’s Ground Operations grant application, evaluation section. My suggestions are: 2- The applicant should ensure that their response that supports each selection is sufficient and revise if necessary. 4- The applicant’s narrative to support the first selection is good. For the second selection, the applicant should revise their narrative to specifically name each and more than one stakeholder and explain how each identified stakeholder is a stakeholder in this Ground Operations project. The applicant should note that RTF is a paid participant in this project and is thus not a stakeholder. 5- I think the applicant has listed too many individuals and organizations as only a minimum of four are required to secure the maximum 4 points in this question. The applicant should list only five or six which are organizations as the question asks for (not individuals) and provide a detailed explanation for how each listed partner will participate in this Ground Operations project. 6- I think the applicant misunderstood this question. The applicant should revise their selections and revise their narrative to provide a detailed explanation for each statement that was checked, as related to this Ground Operations project, and not to what was done to the project area in previous projects. 8- I think the applicant should ensure that each of the selections are mentioned in the Project Description. It appears that they forgot to discuss fishing and forgot to select “Equestrian trails”. Thank you for considering my suggestions. Jon Baker - 4/1/2018


I would like to comment on the El Dorado County CAO’s Education and Safety grant application. My suggestions are: Project Description: The applicant should remove reference to any non-motorized activities such as bicycles and hiking and adjust any cost items accordingly. The applicant forgot that last year they lost a significant portion of funding in the final review stage due to the inclusion of ineligible non-motorized activities in an OHV Education project. The applicant should also reference and discuss all items selected in evaluation question 8. Evaluation Criteria: 6- The applicant should revise the narrative supporting the first selection as the applicant did not identify how the public meeting was noticed. For the second selection, the applicant must identify more than one stakeholder by name and explain how each stakeholder is a stakeholder in this Ground Operations project. The applicant should remove reference to RTF as they are a paid participant in this project and not eligible to be a stakeholder. 8- I think the applicant should ensure that they did not forget to select all related methods of education utilized in this project, and also ensure that each selection is discussed in the Project Description. They forgot that last year they lost points in their final application for this reason. Thank you for considering my comments. Jon Baker - 4/1/2018


Evaluation 2. Applicant should explain answer to Sensitive Areas and threatened and Endangered listed species. 6. Verify funding information and source 7. Verify meeting dates? Terra Nelson - 4/1/2018


Ground Operations There is no discussion of what they need a Combi Hammer for? Equipment Use Expense Equipment Expense-The notes for the razor expense does not make sense? Evaluation 5. How do the partners participate in the project? 6. How do they relate to this project? 8. Can equestrian use the use the trail or does it provide access for equestrian use? Terra Nelson - 4/1/2018


Project Description This is an OHV grant why are bicycles and hiking mentioned? Evaluation 6. How was this meeting publicly noticed? 8. How are these methods of education used? Terra Nelson - 4/1/2018


Evaluation 6. How do the partners participate in the project? Terra Nelson - 4/1/2018


I know Imperial County sheriffs do a great job of keeping peace in OHV areas of Imperial County. I have never, however, seen a restoration grant from a sheriffs office. In the grant there is talk about rock and fence to stop OHV from going on the Playa, but there are no line items in the grant request for materials, other than a patrol vehicle. I like this agency, but feel this grant request is a stretch on what restoration grants should be. Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


Inyo County is a wonderland of historical sites, artifacts, unique geography and a web of OHV trails. These gifts should not be protected "from OHV enthusiasts", but protected from abuse by the public so that access can be maintained. The OHV community encourages the assistance of law enforcement to help us maintain lawful access to the backcountry areas. Hunting, fishing, bird watching, wildlife and wildflower viewing are just some of the many uses of OHVs in this amazing area. The OHV community wants to see active participation by the Inyo County Sheriff's Dept. and fully supports this grant request. Their assistance in maintaining lawful use of trails will help keep our roads open and the advancement of the Adventure Trails pilot program. Thank you. Mike Johnston - 3/26/2018


This grant proposal should be approved and fully funded. It is general knowledge in our area that there are very few Law Enforcement Officers patrolling our public lands. While the vast majority of OHV users obey the regulations and respect our public lands, there are those few that do not. The people that violate protective laws on our public lands need to know that Law Enforcement is out there and that they may be caught and prosecuted. Even the low level of law enforcement presence requested in this proposal will help. Thank You Pat Woods - 4/1/2018


I continue to do a lot of hiking up above Palmdale's west side in the hills above the aqua duct and south of Godde Pass. There are a growing number of hikers, runners and bicycle enthusiasts that use that area for recreation and exercise. I imagine this area is busier than most parks in Palmdale and Lancaster on the weekends. Most people are courteous, friendly and everything goes well. The biggest issue continues to be the dirt bike riders who continue to rocket through the area and tear up the countryside. Immediately behind my house I have seen them pull out fencing along the aqua duct that happens to be in their way. The noise and damage to desert landscape is annoying. There is also continued problems with trash dumping and obvious signs of drinking parties up in the hills. My wife and I would appreciate the most patrols possible in this growing "recreation area" above Palmdale. As is usually the case, it is only the presence of law enforcement that keeps things under control and safe for all of us to use! Thanks Ron Tucker - 3/9/2018


I have lived in Acton, CA for 17 years now. During this time period we've been inundated with Illegal Dirt Bike riding, OHV's (including Polaris type vehicles and homemade dune buggies) and the like. Despite putting up signs and verbally telling the offenders that their activities are illegal, it has continued. Not only do they disturb the peace, but they tear up our roads, our hills, trespass through properties, they are rude and inconsiderate, they create a lot of dust, noise, cause ruts in the roads and hillsides which lead to erosion and flooding of various areas where people like us live (in the dirt). There have been a number of other times when I've been on horseback and had illegal dirt bike riders or Quads come out of nowhere and scare my horses who in turn run and become out of control causing great danger to not just myself but also to the horse and anyone else who may end up in the path of an out of control horse. We need the Palmdale Sheriff Station to continue the OHV Team in charge of patrolling and catching these offenders on Sheriff Department Dirt bikes. There is no other way to catch these offenders as Deputies in patrol vehicles have no way of getting their patrol vehicles through skinny tight paths, or up on the SCE Roads, or other steep areas, etc. Since the OHV Team this has been patrolling our area and responding to complaints, the number of offenders has gone down greatly. Some offenders remain a problem but it is being worked on by the Enforcement Detail. I ask that this Grant be given to the Applying agency so they may continue doing the outstanding job which they have been doing. Cathy Norman - 3/11/2018


To Whom It May Concern: This letter is in support of the continued funding of the Off Highway Vehicle Enforcement Team, Law Enforcement, Palmdale. My town of Agua Dulce, California, has a population of about 4,000 people and we have one “resident deputy” to patrol our entire area. The resident deputy program doesn’t actually require the deputy live in the area. This area is a rural equestrian community with mountainous terrain, vast vegetation and mostly dirt roads. Local residents live here to enjoy the Pacific Crest Trails, Angeles National Forest, and the other informal trail systems maintained for equestrians. However, the serenity of this rural nature is often destroyed by illegal motor vehicles and their frequent criminal behavior. Here are a few incidents the OHV team assisted with this year. First, a large, organized motorcycle ride was stopped by the team. That day, I saw 7 trucks loaded with motorcycles. I stopped 2 of the vehicles and told the occupants they could not ride in this area and that is was patrolled by LASD. The vehicles drove past me anyway, trespassed onto private property, unloaded their motorcycles and began carving up our beautiful, peaceful valley. The OHV team arrived and put an end to it. We need OHV teams to access these areas because a patrol car physically cannot utilize these trails to track down the wrongdoers. After OHV issued threats of citations from that incident, we experienced a significant drop in motorcycle riding. In addition to needing the OHV for targeting the off-road nuisance, we also need their services as a law enforcement presence in our area. The team has investigated a variety of other types of illegal activity for us: a stolen and stripped vehicle that was abandoned in my area, trespassers on our property, and a squatter who was growing marijuana. This last situation turned out to be a heavily armed parolee out of Texas. Kids and women often road past this growing operation and I hate to think of what could’ve happened if the OHV team hadn’t discovered the situation. Our community is often targeted by criminals because we have only 1 deputy assigned to us and the larger stations are so far away that the response times are long. The criminals have engaged in home invasion robberies to mailbox theft here. The more present the law enforcement units, hopefully the more deterrence of crime. As an equestrian and trail runner, I often think about emergency situations that can occur out in the open area here. My family knows if I were not to return from one of my outdoor adventures, to contact this team because they know these trails as well as the locals. I know they could find me faster than a regular patrol. Having this unit available isn’t just for crime fighting, but also for emergency situations. Finally, I want to thank the OHV and specifically the retiring Sgt. Jeff Acton for the continued communication with my family to help us feel safe and secure in our area. Due to the hostile nature of the off-road trespassers, I often feel vulnerable to their threatening behavior. However, Sgt. Acton is only a phone call away and that gives me peace of mind. Even when he isn’t on duty, he gets a patrol unit to us as soon as possible. I like personally knowing the law enforcement officers who are protecting my family and relying on them for our safety. Sgt. Acton exemplifies community-based policing and our community NEEDS this unit! The Calnan Family - 3/11/2018


Hello I would first like to thank you for your work. I am a proud Palmdale resident who supports the city. I would like to say I am in favor of the grant but with some suggestions. What better way to police the police in allowing local residents to be part of the patrols and clean ups of deserts. Also will deter homeless camps from popping up. Kids could joins as part of community clean up in exchange for riding safety from an officer. They can meet and get to know the local residents.I respect everyone’s privacy and peace so I would say a bi monthly desert meetings during riding seasons? In return It would allow law enforcement the documentation of riders and equipment to deter from theft and violations. A civilian tag or permit to ride. Clean up of local areas or report issues while riding. Extra set of eyes . Thank you again Palmdale Resident, Heber Ventura - 3/11/2018


Following are my comments in support of the 2017-2018 Law Enforcement Grant Application dated 2/21/2018 that the Napa County Sheriff’s Office has submitted to the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division: Without the involvement of the Napa County Sheriff’s Department OHV Team patrolling the Knoxville Area and Devil’s Head County Road in particular, lawlessness would return to a dangerous and unacceptable level. This includes trespass onto private property, illegal hunting and poaching, garbage dumping, the unlawful and unsafe discharge of firearms and marijuana cultivation. In addition the OHV team has played a large role in reducing accidents involving the unlawful and unlicensed operation of OHVs and motorcycles on Devil’s Head County Road to the benefit of local property owners and the general public. BLM does not have adequate law enforcement staffing to provide a meaningful presence in the Knoxville area. It is unfortunate that BLM has failed for an extended period of time to properly designate Devils’ Head Road as a Napa County public road. This exclusion includes on site signage, brochures and maps provided to the general public. The designation as a county road is important not only from a legal standpoint but also from a safety and law enforcement point of view. The proper designation of Devil’s Head Road as a county road versus just an undesignated BLM road or trail is a very important distinction. Correct road designation signage and directions will make a big difference in the public’s perception of lawful road usage, safe vehicle driving, law enforcement and proper OHV/motorcycle operation in particular. Irrespective of the very positive effect that the Napa County OHV team has in controlling unlawful OHV/motorcycle use and other illegal activities in the KRA they cannot be on site 24/7. Properly placed signage would certainly help the Sheriff’s OHV team responding to emergencies and law enforcement issues. Search and rescue operations are another very important function provided by the OHV team and would be aided by adequate signage. It is not unusual for deer hunters or hikers to become disoriented and lost in such a rugged and remote area. OHV/motorcycle breakdowns and accidents may also involve search and rescue activities by the OHV team. I think it is quite accurate to say that local property owners and the great majority of individuals seeking recreation activities in the Knoxville Recreation Area look upon Napa County’s OHV law enforcement patrolling as being a very important and necessary activity. As a long-term property and homeowner on Devil’s Head Road, I strongly support Napa County Sheriff’s Department’s 2017-2018 application for grant funds from the California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Division. Joseph Erasmy Devil’s Head Road Napa County Joseph Erasmy - 3/16/2018


-Recreation opportunities for locals and tourists. -Educational opportunities for local recreation programs. -Creates local employment. -Economic viability for our community through tourism. -Sustainable trails mean more fun with less work and maintenance. -Protect environmental resources through sustainable development. Saylor Flett - 3/15/2018


-Recreation opportunities for locals and tourists. -Educational opportunities for local recreation programs. -Creates local employment. -Economic viability for our community through tourism. -Sustainable trails mean more fun with less work and maintenance. -Protect environmental resources through sustainable development. Saylor Flett - 3/15/2018


These grants are very important to our rural community. They provide recreation that improves community health, attract tourism, and promote environmental stewardship among users. Plumas County has several advantages that allow investment in this infrastructure to provide excellent benefits to the community. The terrain is excellent for recreation activities and the climate is perfect during the summer months when people are most likely to vacation. The rural community would benefit from the trail network by providing: direct and indirect employment, fitness and recreation opportunities, and attracting newcomers to settle in the area. Regards, Lauren Miller - 3/15/2018


This project increases recreation opportunities for locals and tourists through the creation of sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance. elizabeth sorrentino - 3/15/2018


Create sustainable trail systems that require less maintenance Becca - 3/15/2018


As a partner organization with SBTS, I am enthusiastically providing support for ground operations grants to continue the excellent work they do throughout the Feather River region to provide stewardship and recreational opportunities. Aubrey Pickerell - 3/16/2018


My name is Stephen Pappas and I am asking you to award the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) grants which will provide them the funding to maintain their existing trail systems. These trails are used by thousands of mountain bikers and recreationalists annually, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars into the local and regional economies. Without trail maintenance such as removing obstructions and smoothing out the trails, there will be a significant increase in accidents and injuries resulting in emergency personnel having to respond in remote areas and possibly death. Secondly, if the trails are in poor condition, and word of injuries became widespread via the internet and personal communication, this could lead to a sharp decline in user numbers which in turn would negatively affect the local and regional economies. Being an avid mountain biker living in Northern California, I ride these trails often, donate to the SBTS, and help volunteer when possible, but it is mostly the grants from the State, Federal, and Local agencies that allow the SBTS to expand, maintain, and provide stewardship for these amazing trails which are recognized as some of the best trails in the country. Thank you for your consideration for these grants. Stephen Pappas - 3/16/2018


My name is Stephen Pappas and I am asking you to award the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) grants which will provide them the funding to maintain their existing trail systems. These trails are used by thousands of mountain bikers and recreationalists annually, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars into the local and regional economies. Without trail maintenance such as removing obstructions and smoothing out the trails, there will be a significant increase in accidents and injuries resulting in emergency personnel having to respond in remote areas and possibly death. Secondly, if the trails are in poor condition, and word of injuries became widespread via the internet and personal communication, this could lead to a sharp decline in user numbers which in turn would negatively affect the local and regional economies. Being an avid mountain biker living in Northern California, I ride these trails often, donate to the SBTS, and help volunteer when possible, but it is mostly the grants from the State, Federal, and Local agencies that allow the SBTS to expand, maintain, and provide stewardship for these amazing trails which are recognized as some of the best trails in the country. Thank you for your consideration for these grants. Stephen Pappas - 3/16/2018


Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has continued to do a great job with trails in Plumas and Sierra counties. Their efforts really give back to the public with access that had been lost or made very difficult due to lack in trail maintenance. I very much enjoy seeing grant money go to organizations that give back to the public in return. Mt Hough is a great example of SBTS efforts and would love to see them receive continued support in grant money to expand on the trail system in this area. I'm not a fan to 'shuttle' riding, where you take a vehicle to the top and ride down, I like to ride up as well as down. Having trails optimized for riding up would be great. Thanks for the opportunity to provide feedback! Tom Embree - 3/16/2018


Sierra Buttes trail stewardship has done an incredible job bringing new recreation opportunities to Plumas County AND in attracting visitors who would otherwise never come to our area. Not only do visitors come, stay, and spread the word about our area, they are changing our towns demographic and economy. I support SBTS trail projects in Quincy because I see a positive impact on locals, our economy, and our community health. The trails are sustainable, ecologically sound, and user friendly. Michael Hall - 3/16/2018


The Plumas County OHV Trail System is an important resource for the area & those who love to ride the trails. Because of their annual use & location, the trails require annual maintenance. The SBTS is the best of Northern California at trail stewardship. Pleae help fund this work to keep this trail system open & viable. Mike Chaplin - 3/16/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Morgan Fletcher - 3/16/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Morgan Fletcher - 3/16/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Melissa Mache - 3/17/2018


Our family loves Plumas County and uses many of the trails. These improvements will provide more recreational opportunities, economic improvements, and continue to improve wonderful Plumas County. Definitely a project that should be approved. Thank you! Karen and Family karen siroky - 3/16/2018


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's vision and work in the Lost Sierra. For the past 9 years I have regularly visited the area 2-3x a year to assist with and enjoy the fruits of their labor. The trails bring me and my family back to swim, bike, camp, dine, buy gear, etc. Without maintenance and upkeep, these trails would wither and I would look elsewhere to spend my precious time and money. BRIAN KELLY - 3/20/2018


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's vision and work in the Lost Sierra. For the past 9 years I have regularly visited the area 2-3x a year to assist with and enjoy the fruits of their labor. The trails bring me and my family back to swim, bike, camp, dine, buy gear, etc. Without maintenance and upkeep, these trails would wither and I would look elsewhere to spend my precious time and money. BRIAN KELLY - 3/20/2018


I live and work in Quincy and I am a weekly if not daily user of the forest via foot, bike, ski and moto. The proposed trail work which would be funded by this grant would be another large step in the right direction for the trails in the PNF which surround Quincy. As our area continues to be discovered as a recreation destination these trails will see more user days and will require dedicated maintenance to keep them fun and sustainable. The trail systems on Claremont and in the Snake lake area can be improved easily to be more usable and they also are major links in the chain of trails which at this point nearly surround the American Valley. Nelson Creek trail is an amazing connector through incredible country which would allow for access from the American Valley side over to the Downieville trail system, as a mountain biker and moto rider I believe this would be a fantastic addition to our area. The current state of the Nelson Creek trail is primitive and will benefit hugely from this grant funded work. Thank you Cameron Falconer Owner, Falconer Cycles Quincy, CA Cameron Falconer - 3/21/2018


Please consider providing the grant for continual ground operations for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in the Quincy region. I live in Paradise and travel out to Quincy and surrounding area at least 1-2x a month during MTB season. The team is amazing, and the work they provide is extremely necessary to provide maintenance for the trail system. While providing recreational opportunity for everyone, they are also sustaining the trail system by properly building and maintaing all trails. Thanks! Torey Feldhaus - 3/20/2018


Please consider providing the grant for continual ground operations for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in the Quincy region. I live in Paradise and travel out to Quincy and surrounding area at least 1-2x a month during MTB season. The team is amazing, and the work they provide is extremely necessary to provide maintenance for the trail system. While providing recreational opportunity for everyone, they are also sustaining the trail system by properly building and maintaing all trails. Thanks! Torey Feldhaus - 3/20/2018


I own a vacation home in the area (in Graeagle). Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has markedly improved the trail systems through out the Plumas County area. The rides are more fun and the trails better maintained. This has increased trail usage and increased recreational tourism to the area. I believe this is a very positive effect on the area and community and support this grant. Mike Eglington - 3/20/2018


The magnificent trail work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is what attracted my partner and I to move to Quincy. They are bringing a much needed economic revenue to Plumas County. And more importantly, providing amazing recreational opportunities for residents and future generations. I use the network of trails on Mt. Hough and South Park almost daily and those trails are the primary reason I live here. Eric Caubo - 3/21/2018


The magnificent trail work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is what attracted my partner and I to move to Quincy. They are bringing a much needed economic revenue to Plumas County. And more importantly, providing amazing recreational opportunities for residents and future generations. I use the network of trails on Mt. Hough and South Park almost daily and those trails are the primary reason I live here. Eric Caubo - 3/21/2018


The magnificent trail work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is what attracted my partner and I to move to this area. They are bringing a much needed economic revenue to to Plumas and Sierra County. And more importantly, providing amazing recreational opportunities for residents and future generations. I regularly use many different trails maintained by SBTS and look forward to the new trails they are working on. Eric Caubo - 3/21/2018


The Mt Hough trail system is very important to my family for summer recreation. Thank you for supporting their mission. Daniel Kuhns - 3/22/2018


I'm sending you this email to voice my support for the ground operations grant for trail work in the Mt. Hough trail system. The trails in this area get hammered each winter and always need general maintenance. Please award Plumas County this grant so they can keep the trails in the Mt. Hough trail system safe, sustainable and fun to bike/hike, etc. Regards, James Alcorn - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Jonathan Lamb - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Jonathan Lamb - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Joel Wilson - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Joel Wilson - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. lindsay - 3/23/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Lindsay - 3/23/2018


Love SBTS, great work done by a great group of folks! Doing a great job of building and maintaining multi use trail networks. Brings and promotes multiple forms of responsible recreation to the area. Cody Leuck - 3/23/2018


Love SBTS, great work done by a great group of folks! Doing a great job of building and maintaining multi use trail networks. Brings and promotes multiple forms of responsible recreation to the area. Cody Leuck - 3/23/2018


I am a regular trail user and recreational mountain biker who supports the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship because of the quality and efficiency of their work and the benefits that trail maintenance provides to local communities. Eric Richter - 3/23/2018


I fully support continued maintenance grants to Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in the Mt. Hough Ranger District, as they are keeping system trails open and passable to the public. Each season trail maintenance is required, especially after winter storms that can bring trees down big enough to block passage. I am particularly excited to hear that Nelson Creek Trail is now a part of this Ground Operations grant, as it is a historic trail in great need of maintenance, including heavy brushing, drainage improvements and log out. Nelson Creek Trail is a vital connector trail that can eventually link Downieville to Quincy via single track. Having an OHV legal single track connector between these two Lost Sierra communities will be an enormous boost to the regional economy, attracting recreationists from around the country while providing increased connectivity for local residents. Thank you California OHV for providing much needed grant dollars for these important public lands projects. Kurt Gensheimer - 3/23/2018


We fully support the annual maintenance activities to the Mt Hough area including multi-use OHV trails as proposed and managed by the SBTS. My family enjoys the use of the Mt Hough area trail system and we participate in maintenance when we can, but like many families we do primarily rely on the extraordinary efforts of the SBTS. Thank you. The Simone Family Don Simone - 3/23/2018


Please provide annual maintenance throughout the entire length of the Mt Hough Trail System, Snake Lake, Claremont, and Nelson Creek to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. Jenine Beecher - 3/23/2018


Having been a resident in Quincy for 17 years, access to recreation in the national forest is extremely important to myself and our community. I strongly support the SBTS grant proposal because it promotes the growth of Quincy and the surrounding communities and will improve the local economy by maintaining access to the amazing resources we have here in Plumas County. It will also create new recreational opportunities for many outdoor enthusiasts by creating and maintaining world class multi-use trails. Mason Werner - 3/24/2018


I fully support Plumas county and SBTS being given this grant. By allowing them to maintain the trails, it will help provide many more years of use, allowing both locals and tourists to get out, exercise, and enjoy the beauty that this area has to offer. Elisabeth Johnson - 3/26/2018


The Mt. Hough trail system has a lot going for it already. Smooth, flowing trails, beautiful creekside scenery, and a local appreciation that is only growing. As the trail systems become more popular and more riders come from farther away, the trails will need to withstand heavy use along with their current seasonal challenges of tree/debris clearing etc. More trails will need to be added to this network, and the canvas is there. With the proper funding, the groundwork can be set for this trail system to blossom into a world class network that attracts riders near and far. Murphy Gardner - 3/27/2018


I had the pleasure of growing up in Plumas county, and coming from a family deeply rooted (5 generations) in the area. Over the years I have definitely witnessed an overall decline in the area. After watching the positive impact that the extensive trail work done by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship had on the Downieville area, I was very excited to see them focusing some of their energy on Mt. Hough. I've personally seen their trail work draw people in from a great distance, and it brings a lot of outside money into a very isolated local economy. It's so refreshing to hear people in Sacramento and the Bay Area talking about Mt. Hough, planning trips up to Quincy to visit. I really like the way they promote the whole concept of "stewardship" and get people involved in work days and as a whole creating a feeling of respect and ownership of the trails among the people coming to use them. People get the idea that "these are my trials and I need to take care of them", I think it's an overall positive thing for the community, and as a person with a vested interest in the area I look forward to future projects and see it as a positive thing for the community. Tony McCutcheon - 3/27/2018


SBTS's does great work in sustainable trail building and I have only heard about the Mt Hough area trail system because of their work with Plumas County and look forwarding to visiting Nate Boom - 3/28/2018


I look forward to visiting the Mt Hough area because of the work Plumas County and SBTS have already done in trail building there, and they need support in continuing and maintaining the excellent trail work Nate Boom - 3/28/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Eduardo F. Llach - 3/28/2018


This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Eduardo F. Llach - 3/28/2018


his trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. William Watt - 3/28/2018


his trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: logout, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. William Watt - 3/28/2018


We look forward to working with the US Forrest Service and Plumas County. We believe that driving economic growth through government and non-profit partnerships is a sustainable model. We love recreating in Plumas county and because of projects like this, my great-grandchildren will enjoy this amazing place. Thank you for your consideration. Jesse Passafiume Board President Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship Jesse Passafiume - 3/29/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC supports this grant application for needed maintenance and improvements to single-track trails, quad trails, and 4x4 trails. This is particularly needed after the heavy rains experienced in 2016-17, which have done tremendous damage and erosion to roads and trails frequented by OHV riders that must be mitigated to prevent erosion and additional resource damage. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is supportive of law enforcement grants and related activities on OHV utilized public lands, and of the need for equipment designed to effectively traverse these challenging roads and trails. The LUCC is especially concerned with law enforcement presence during OHV peak use times (weekends and holidays, especially late afternoon and nights) to prevent resource damage on public lands. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 3/29/2018


Mt Hough Trail System, Snake Lake, Claremont, and Nelson Creek! This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. Morgan Lashley - 3/29/2018


Mt Hough Trail System, Snake Lake, Claremont, and Nelson Creek! This trail system needs annual maintenance throughout the entire length to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. Morgan Lashley - 3/29/2018


This organization and the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) are doing great work for a wide variety of trail users. They have an excellent volunteer program where volunteers are able to work to create new trails and maintain existing ones. In addition to local users who benefit from the trail stewardship provided by SBTS, this work also helps to bring in the tourist dollar, strengthening the local community and economy: the trails created and maintained by SBTS have a nationwide following. Please support this program. Thanks David Martin - 3/29/2018


I would like to voice my support of this grant for maintenance of the Mt Hough trail system. Annual maintenance is required and needs funding to sustain and enhance, the quality of the current trail network. Many thousands of volunteer hours have been invested in these trails and the grant represents a commitment and sustainability of the hard work. These multi-use trails attract many people to Pumas County and the economic impact is a real driver to the local economy. I strong support SBTS and Plumas County being awarded this grant to ensure the current trail network continues to be maintained and improved. Frank Nann - 3/29/2018


Mt. Hough is special place, please give the resources Plumas needs to maintain and expand the trail network. adam schwarcz - 3/29/2018


I support this project as it is a great example of local government working with US Forest Service to maintain trails on the Plumas National Forest. The trail maintenance completed protects habitat and watersheds while keeping access to public lands open and safe. As Plumas County grows and diversifies its economy, these recreation based trails help bring visitors to the area while increases local's quality of life. Engaging the public and volunteers shows the support of the community for this project. Johnnie Smith - 3/30/2018


Please fund this grant to support quality maintenance of a world renowned OHV trail system. Peter Hochrein - 3/30/2018


I want to add my name to the chorus of voices asking for support for maintaining and expanding the Mt. Hough Trail System. It's a worthy project that deserves the grant funding. Colin Duwe - 3/30/2018


 

OHMVR Commission, I would like to express my strong support for the Riverside County Regional Park and Open-Space District's grant application for the potential of an OHV facility in the county. Such a facility is desperately needed in Riverside County to serve the families and youth that call the county home. In an age where quality family time is encroached upon by the various demands of increasingly busy lives, this facility will provide a place where parents and children can recreate together. As we see more and more of our youth slide into obesity and inactivity, where they spend more time in front of device screens, OHV recreation has the potential to offer them a healthy alternative. Further a project like this can attract visitors from outside the county who also have limited options for OHV recreation in their home counties. These visitors will positively impact the tax base as they spend not only their recreation hours, but their recreation dollars as well, purchasing fuel, food, and other goods and services from the county businesses. I hope that you will join me in lending your support to this grant application. Respectfully submitted, Russ Brenan Russ Brenan - 3/7/2018


An OHV park built in Riverside county is critical to support the local businesses in the area. It will also provide a much needed location for OHV users to responsibly use our great outdoor environment! Daniel Fahie - 3/7/2018


I've been fortunate to have enjoyed many years of OHV riding and soon will be looking to introduce my children to this great outdoor family activity. There are too many influences from social media, gaming, and smart phones, that have isolated our youth to a sheltered lifestyle. I can see that trend with many of our youth and our outdoor industry is suffering. Having more accessible OHV areas give families like mine opportunities to enjoy this lifestyle and teach our children there is more to life than what they perceive. Walter Toniolo - 3/7/2018


hello, I am in support of the riverside county regional park & open space district's grant application for the OHV facility in riverside county. not only will such an area benefit local families, providing them opportunity to get outside & away from technology, time to bond, but will bring revenue to the county. surrounding families will also benefit as counties such as orange county (where I live) does not have an ohv area. this would bring even more revenue to riverside county w/not only your local families, but visitors as well, spending their money on fuel, food, & supplies while enjoying an OHV park. please support this grant application. thank you, jady enomoto jady enomoto - 3/7/2018


I support and encourage Riverside County to approve a feasibility study for an OHV park project that would benefit the community and families in Riverside County. Kim Harris - 3/8/2018


My family and I are very excited about the possibility of having a OHV park in Riverside. This would be a lot closer to our home in Tustin than the options we visit now. looking forward to a riding place close to home carlos johnston - 3/8/2018


As a life long resident of California, I have seen the decline of off road riding space. OHV recreation areas are needed to offset the loss of use of public lands. OHV recreation is most often a family recreation activity. It strengthens family bonds through interaction, collaboration and shared adventure. That's certainly worthwhile in these times. It would also make sense that there is an economic benefit to areas in the proximity of an OHV area. I know that we spend significant amounts of money on OHV outings and a portion is always spent in the vicinity of the area we visit. Please develop an OHV opportunity in Riverside County. Stephen Prockl - 3/10/2018


This is a needed study. Riverside needs an OHV park where the community can ride in a safe and controlled area. Jeff Dawson - 3/13/2018


This study is important and needed. Howard Hamlin - 3/13/2018


Off Road Society, here in Orange County and Riverside County I was a Yamaha Dealer here in Costa Mesa, Orange County, there is NO LEGAL OFF ROAD RIDING in Orange County. The Power sport Industry is all based here in Orange County. The Off Road Society is been pushed out by the Money People with Development. This is a subject that needs to be addressed! Lets put together Off Road Park Riverside County. Jim Berry - 3/17/2018


I feel like I have seen this grant a number of times in the past. Where is the fruit from those? I agree, Riverside County desperately needs a quality off-road park. I support this grant and really hope you can get somewhere with it. And I hope you can build more than one park. You need an area close to the population and a larger park out to the east. Please consult the California Off-Road Vehicle Association (of which I am a director) for assistance with this project, as we are very knowledgeable and willing to help with this project. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


Putting more law enforcement in parks won't make the parks safer for anybody. Without a plant on how to support and rehabilitate people living there, extra enforcement will only result in displacement and hardship without making anyone safer, and the cost will be a waste. Dustin Heron - 3/14/2018


We feel that the support for equipment and training that this grant would provide are necessary and vital to the safety of the patrolling officers, and ultimately for the general public in Hesperia. We feel that this is a valid use of California tax dollars, and fully support and encourage the award of this grant. - Competitive Edge MX Park Mark - 3/28/2018


This is a good grant that will help with OHV is the county. I have met sheriff's from this group in the past and like that they are willing to work with SDORC. I see in your equipment line items a large quantity of gear. I see 40 sets of goggles. I ride often and one good set can last me for years. Granted, I rinse them out with water after each use. It strikes me funny how many gloves, helmets and goggles you want. Compared to all the grants, its a very small amount of money, so go get the bad guys. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


Why on earth would we want even more reason to be fined? We already can't go to the beach in Lompoc due to "snowy plovers" and pretty much all opportunities for recreation either cost money or have so many rules it's not worth it. 4 wheeling in the river bed is not in anyone's way and while it may be dangerous it's one of the only things left you can do that'd free. Leave the cops on the roads and in the cities, they make up enough to do as it is. - 3/06/2018


I have lived 2 miles west of Buellton on property on the Santa Ynez River for 23 years. During that entire time I have repeatedly posted our property with no trespassing signs which have been repeatedly destroyed by trespassers, many on ATV's. A few years ago one ATV/truck driver, without my permission, brought his bulldozer across the river to my land and made roads for his ATV driving pleasure. Another took a shot at my employee who was in my field working from his ATV with a rifle. This evening I can hear someone with a motorcycle riding on my land. Recently my willows near the river have been cut and run down by trespassing ATV's. This is a constant problem and a serious violation of habitat protection and of peaceful enjoyment of private property, I urge you to patrol and protect the Santa Ynez River from rampant ATV and motorcycle and truck drivers. Mary Jane Edalatpour - 3/7/2018


I strongly support the County of Santa Barbara's request for grant money for off road vehicles to provide public safety to areas not accessible by on road vehicles. Illegal use of the Santa Ynez River bed is harmful to the riparian environment and near by residents and police have no way of enforcing laws without access. Santa Barbra County has recently endured costs from natural disasters and cannot fund this needed service without help from grants like this. Sharyne Merritt - 3/7/2018


I strongly support the County of Santa Barbara's request for grant money for off road vehicles to provide public safety to areas not accessible by on road vehicles. Illegal use of the Santa Ynez River bed is harmful to the riparian environment and near by residents and police have no way of enforcing laws without access. Santa Barbra County has recently endured costs from natural disasters and cannot fund this needed service without help from grants like this. Sharyne Merritt - 3/7/2018


$220k for a quad the county will sell in the next budget cycle, I don't think is necessary. Now, if the county actually did patrol the riverbed, I would agree. This is just a money grab. There is a couple hundred homeless people living in the same riverbed, being ignored. Sadly, I will be ignored. California has gone down the toilet. However, whoever reads this, if anyone, have a good day! Forrest A Libby - 3/9/2018


Absolute waste of resources - ATV riders are not causing damage- The damage is the 150+ homeless, mixed with drug addicts, illegals and alcoholics cutting out hillsides, starting wildfires, intimidating residents and leaving trash. The sheriffs office is whining about being short staffed, chronically over budget, forced overtime. DO NOT WASTE TAX MONEY giving this grant to Santa Barbara Sheriffs. There are absolutely zero cases of riders causing anything but noise at times, that can be handled by normal patrol. If this is such an issue, the county should block access paths. 150 people move in - start fires and it's ok. A kid rides in a dry sandy riverbed and it's a crime- where deputies will make OVERTIME $70 plus an hour. Not counting the diversion of funds for "training" and "education" Joe Stetz - 3/10/2018


Please see attached document. Hannah-Beth Jackson Senator, 19th District - 3/12/2018


Please review and accept the Grant Application of Metcalf Motorcycle Park, a division of Santa Clara County Parks and Rec. It is imperative to OHV recreation that Metcalf be given supporting budget. Recently, county residents lost the only motocross track within the city that was at the county fairgrounds. Rent became too high. Metcalf is now the ONLY option in the county for OHV recreation. The nearest OHV park is now 41 miles away at Hollister Hills in San Benito County. The closest motocross track is Club Moto, in Livermore, also roughly 40 miles away. In the months since 408mx's closure there has been a significant increase in Metcalf usage. The grant money will go toward maintaining the facility. Thank you! Saul Jacobs - 3/9/2018


Please review and accept the Grant Application of Metcalf Motorcycle Park, a division of Santa Clara County Parks and Rec. It is imperative to OHV recreation that Metcalf be given supporting budget. Recently, county residents lost the only motocross track within the city that was at the county fairgrounds. Rent became too high. Metcalf is now the ONLY option in the county for OHV recreation. The nearest OHV park is now 41 miles away at Hollister Hills in San Benito County. The closest motocross track is Club Moto, in Livermore, also roughly 40 miles away. In the months since 408mx's closure there has been a significant increase in Metcalf usage. The grant money will go toward maintaining the facility. Thank you! Saul Jacobs - 3/9/2018


Metcalf Motorcycle Park serves thousands of dirt bike riders every year and is one of the most popular parks in the South Bay. The grant money that the state provides to Metcalf is extremely important for the continued maintenance of Metcalf Motorcycle Park. Due to the popularity of Metcalf, weekly maintenance of the trails and tracks are required for safe operation. In addition erosion control is also an important safety concern as well as ensuring a sustainable future for OHV activity. The Rangers and staff at Metcalf Motorcycle Park do a wonderful job and we all appreciate their dedication. So the money for this grant is money well spent. Thank you, Andy Bajka Los Altos California Andy Bajka - 3/12/2018


I'd like to express my support for the Santa Clara Motorcycle County Park (MCP) located at 300 Metcalf Road in San Jose. I ride my OHV motorcycle there almost every single weekend and am always impressed by how well maintained and safe it is. The park rangers do a superb job of communicated the conditions of the park to the public via multiple social media apps/services so it is easy to know what you can expect. The park rangers always make safety the number one priority and as a rider, that is the most important thing I look for when choosing an OHV park to ride at. The programs and designated areas that they have for young children are another positive that make the park desirable to a parent like me who has kids that will soon be old enough to enjoy OHV activities. I know that when I do bring my children here that they will be able to learn in a safe and well controlled environment where the park rangers are always making sure the park is100% family oriented. Eric Angel - 3/12/2018


I use MetCalf Motorcycle Park often. It's a gem of a park. It's well run (the rangers are great!) and as safe as can be. I taught my kids to ride there. I still use the park as a way to unwind after a work day, or for a little weekend adventure. Please help maintain and expand the park. It's an important resource for the motorcycling community. Thank you, Alan Alan Gale - 3/13/2018


Metcalf Motorcycle park in San Jose is a silicon valley gem! It is one of the very few places where motorcycle enthusiasts can enjoy this awesome sport so close to home. Metcalf serves thousands like myself who simply cannot travel very far to ride our motorcycles. The rangers at Metcalf do an excellent job. The track and trails are always very well maintained. The rangers are polite and helpful. Metcalf needs the grant money from the state to continue providing this invaluable service to many like myself who enjoy this healthy recreation. Thank you! --Ankur Pai Cupertino, CA Ankur Pai - 3/13/2018


Please approve this grant as it provides an opportunity to play outdoors. This is healthy for the future of the country. Butch Meyner - 3/13/2018


Please approve this grant as operating staff is critical for maximizing safety and the enjoyment of park users Butch Meyner - 3/13/2018


Please approve this grant as law enforcement provides a tremendous service to our community and users of this park Butch Meyner - 3/13/2018


The Santa Clara County Parks and Recreation Department provides much needed OHV opportunities for our area. The increasingly-urban area of Silicon Valley has few other locations to visit for OHV use, and this area is very valuable to riders. Please do grant this request: the site is well run, open, and OHV users will benefit from all enhancements. Thank you. Sean Casey - 3/13/2018


Metcalf Motorcycle Park serves thousands of dirt bike riders every year and is one of the most popular parks in the South Bay. The grant money that the state provides to Metcalf is extremely important for the continued maintenance of Metcalf Motorcycle Park. Due to the popularity of Metcalf, weekly maintenance of the trails and tracks are required for safe operation. In addition erosion control is also an important safety concern as well as ensuring a sustainable future for OHV activity. The Rangers and staff at Metcalf Motorcycle Park do a wonderful job and we all appreciate their dedication. So the money for this grant is money well spent. I look forward to the continued operations of Metcalf and possible expansion of this terrific park for many years to come. Thank you, John wear John Wear - 3/13/2018


Metcalf motorcycle park has been and continues to be one of my families favorite destinations for OHV recreation. It is a fun, well run, and educational park, and we appreciate any efforts to support Metcalf. Antonio Ceccato - 3/14/2018


Metcalf is great for my family! Please grant their grants as requested! Michael Madsen - 3/15/2018


Metcalf OHV park is a great place for me to spend time being active and bonding with my family. All while we enjoy the beauty and nature of our valley's foothills. Please approve Metcalf's grants so our public can continue to enjoy this wonderful resource. David Blacow - 3/16/2018


Metcalf OHV park is a great place for me to spend time being active and bonding with my family. All while we enjoy the beauty and nature of our valley's foothills. Please approve Metcalf's grants so our public can continue to enjoy this wonderful resource. David Blacow - 3/16/2018


Metcalf OHV park is a great place for me to spend time being active and bonding with my family. All while we enjoy the beauty and nature of our valley's foothills. Please approve Metcalf's grants so our public can continue to enjoy this wonderful resource. David Blacow - 3/16/2018


Metcalf OHV park is a great place for me to spend time being active and bonding with my family. All while we enjoy the beauty and nature of our valley's foothills. Please approve Metcalf's grants so our public can continue to enjoy this wonderful resource. David Blacow - 3/16/2018


Education can save the world. We are doomed if people do no understand the interdependence of the flora and fauna and geography. This is taught in a structured way with the Junior Ranger Program, as well as in chats between rangers and riders, and between riders in difficult situations. Educated riders become stewards of the land. We are environmentalists. Butch Meyner - 3/18/2018


Please support this grant. Education helps everyone understand what safety equipment is available and what it can do. Being educated of the discomfort and of the life changing consequences possible without correct gear is a tremendous help for some individuals. Gus Meyner - 3/18/2018


As a regular user of SC county park, I support this application Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


As a regular user of SC county parks, I support this application. Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


As a regular user of SC county parks, I support this application. Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


As a regular user of SC county parks, I support this application. Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


Please support this grant. Education helps everyone understand what safety equipment is available and what it can do. Being educated of the discomfort and of the life changing consequences possible without correct gear is a tremendous help for some individuals. Thank you. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


I am a regular visitor to Metcalf. Metcalf Motorcycle Park serves thousands of dirt bike riders every year and is one of the most popular parks in the South Bay. The grant money that the state provides to Metcalf is extremely important for the continued maintenance of Metcalf Motorcycle Park. Due to the popularity of Metcalf, weekly maintenance of the trails and tracks are required for safe operation. The park does require upkeep and maintenance for riders to enjoy to the fullest and to be safe. The Rangers and staff at Metcalf Motorcycle Park do a wonderful job and we all appreciate their dedication. So the money for this grant is money well spent. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


Metcalf is awesome for me and my family. Please help them with their grant requests. Alex Gray - 3/19/2018


Metcalf is awesome for me and my family. Please help them with their grant requests. Alex Gray - 3/19/2018


Please keep this park funded! This is an outstanding park for OHV activity. The staff is professional and I love the way they run this park. This park must be kept open and funded for the future of our kids and OHV in general. Rick Araujo - 3/31/2018


With less than 5 Deputies and reserve staff this agency can use all the additional funding it can get! This proposal is worthy of being funded, the area is extreme with bone chilling cold to over 100 degree summers these folks have their work cut out for them. The proposal asks only for what is needed unlike other requests from other agencies. This agency although not listed on their application uses numerous volunteers to locate the lost, injured and guide people to the right location in the middle of no where. Keep up the good work Sierra County! Matt Boyd - 3/23/2018


We the LOCAL OHV user who reside within Tuolumne county, would like to see our Forest lands open year-round and much less restrictive, Rather than CLOSED April 27 - October 10. Restricted use is currently in place during summer months and all winter long (especially during drought years, which are much more common). During drought years and years with virtually no snow, we would like increased access to land use. Storm damage has caused much more restrictive use of public lands currently; we would like to see these funds used to provide repairs to lands currently restricted. For Example - Cherry Lake Rd / 1NO7 has been closed intermittently for years and is in great disrepair. Another example is much needed recreational use (boat ramp) at Beardsley Lake (dam) Forest Route 4N39. Local residents not only help educate non-locals (and uneducated locals), but we also help reduce law enforcement and rescue needs by allowing us greater access. We are second pairs of eyes/ears and travel great distances to help fellow recreaters in need. Thank you! Jeannine Ratliff - 3/7/2018


NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

I think Butte County SAR provides a lot of useful assistance to those who use the OHV areas in Butte County and therefore definitely deserves to be awarded this grant. Matthew Van Gent - 3/8/2018


The Sheriff's Search and Rescue Winter OHV response and Safety Equipment Program has helped keep our population safe and happy for many years. This is a vital service, in high elevations, and provides a necessary safety factor to our winter play and enjoyment. They are called on many times. They even rescued my minor daughter when the adult's Christmas Tree party's vehicle broke down leaving them in a remote area with freezing snow on the ground. Robin Bennett - 3/9/2018


What an incredible addition to the Search & Rescue Unit that serves our County. Our Family spends lots of time in that country and between November and April we do get's lot's of snow. Knowing that our Rescuers have the capability to get to us no matter what the conditions makes recreating that much more fun for our Family. I hope they get these resources as they are very expensive to self fund.... Stephanie Greco - 3/19/2018


I OWN A CABIN IN BUTTE MEADOWS AND KNOW HOW THE SEARCH AND RESCUE SERVES THIS AREA WELL. IN WINTER MOST OWNERS HAVE OHV SNOW MOBILES OR QUADS TO GET TO THEIR CABIN AND MANY PEOPLE START AT BUTTE MEADOWS TO RIDE TRAILS. A NEIGHBOR FELL OFF HIS RANGER COUPLE OF YEARS AGO AND THE FIRE DEPARTMENT COULDNT REACH IT SEARCH AND RESCUE BROGHT THEIR SNOW CAT AND BROUGHT HIM TO AN AMBULANCE. I SUPPORT THE GRANT REQUEST FOR SNOW MOBILES IT WILL MAKE OHV SAFER UP HERE. JOHN FERGUSON - 3/19/2018


The Butte County Federal/State Land Use Coordinating Committee (LUCC) supports this grant application. The LUCC is a Board appointed (Brown Act) committee representing Butte County citizens’ interests in the areas of recreation, forest management, tourism/economic development and environment/watershed, working closely with the Plumas and Lassen National Forests and other public land managers. These comments were developed at a public meeting with input from the public. The LUCC is strongly supportive of this grant application and the vital need for the purchase of the snowmobiles and related safety equipment to better enable safe access to snow covered areas in the local OHV areas for the Butte County Search and Rescue units. Peggy Moak, LUCC - 4/2/2018


With regards to the MCRPD "Regional Park Property" at 30900 Highway 20, Fort Bragg CA 95437: There has been NO EIR to confirm that the property is suitable for training purposes. MCRPD turned the property over to the OHV without ANY review of sensitive habitat, bird health, pygmy and bishop pine needs, noise. Before a grant is secured for this project a full EIR needs to take place. D. Location of Training Services We have three secured training sites in Fort Bragg, one site in Ukiah and one site in Samoa. Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District “Regional Park Property” 30900 Highway 20, Fort Bragg CA 95437 This is our primary training location, due to the large flat area with no obstacles and easy access to trails and small hills for use during training. We are the only organization that has legal access to this property, so it allows us to train children in an open area, free of obstacles and other hazards. We do not have to be concerned about our students running into cars, horse trailers or fences. We also use this property for our 4 x 4, dune buggy, and motorcycle demonstrations. We use this facility for our trail ride classes as well. This will be our primary training facility for dirt bikes as well. Melissa Hays - 3/21/2018


The Dorothy King Young Chapter of the California Native Plant Society focuses on protection of, and education about native plant species and natural habitats that occur within coastal Mendocino County, roughly from the Pacific Ocean to the coastal mountains west of Highway 101. One of the most significant and highly imperiled rare natural communities, which is limited in distribution to the Mendocino Coast, is the Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodland (pygmy forest). This community, which includes vegetation of both short and tall stature, was estimated to cover about 4,200 acres in 2006. In 2016, surveys by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) found that only 1,480 acres of pygmy forest remain. Of the remaining, approximately 20% occurs on the 586-acre Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District property that is used by the California Recreation Alliance for OHV training. Another rare natural plant community, the Bishop pine forest, which is also in decline in California, occurs over much of the 586 acres. The highly imperiled and rare “Sholars Bog” is located on an adjacent, downstream parcel. Wetlands are prevalent throughout the property and are critical to the health of the pygmy forest. A magnificent old growth redwood, a rare specimen with cavities that provide valuable wildlife habitat, is also there. The California Recreation Alliance, under an exclusive agreement with the Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District, is now requesting additional funding through the OHMVR Grants Program to continue this use. The grant proposal states that riders are trained to stay on trails to avoid impacts to sensitive areas, however, the trail riding in itself is exacerbating significant impacts to the rare natural communities on the property. The OHV training and use is being conducted with OHMVR funding without having first conducted any environmental review to determine whether the site is appropriate for such activities. The necessary botanical/biological surveys have not been conducted, nor has there been an analysis of the highly erosive and saturated soil conditions that occur throughout the property, and that support the rare plant communities. While CNPS supports the safe use of motorized recreational vehicles, we do not support this use where it serves to further impact rare plant communities and species. We also do not support funding for the continued practice of OHV use in highly sensitive areas prior to conducting legally required and necessary environmental analysis to assess the species and habitats at risk, to develop appropriate avoidance and mitigation measures, and to disclose this information to the public and regulatory agencies through the CEQA process. We encourage the California Recreational Alliance to continue OHV safety and training exercises on lands that can better support these activities without environmental degradation, and not continue this use on the MCRPD property on Highway 20 in Fort Bragg. Renee Pasquinelli Conservation Co-chair (north) CNPS Dorothy King Young Chapter Renee Pasquinelli - 3/21/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org has reviewed Education and Safety Grant # G17-04-54-S01 and strongly supports the proposal. BRC believes rider education is an important cornerstone in the 3E OHV Triangle (Education, Enforcement, and Engineering) of OHV Recreation in California. BRC commends the California Recreation Alliance for expanding its services into Humboldt County and developing strong partnerships with Mendocino Coast Recreation & Park District, Shoreline Riders, BLM-Arcata Office/ Samoa Dunes, and Factory Pipe LLC in Ukiah. BRC understands and appreciates the costs associated with rider education and believes the grant request is commensurate given the size and scope of the service area which includes Mendocino, Lake, and Humboldt Counties. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/22/2018


Regarding G17-07-11-P01 I urge the OHMVR Division to stop providing funding to both the MCRPD and the CRA that further promotes the inappropriate use of this property for OHV park development. The onset of noise, dust, camping, and continued use of this sensitive habitat for OHV vehicles creates a conflict with the animal habitat, walkers, bikers, birders. It is much better for the environment to create a park without noise and petroleum pollution. This park could be used for soccer fields and other activities which are healthy for people AND the environment. Why not restore and respect the property rather than riding loud machines through it. Melissa Hays - 3/22/2018


March 17, 2018 Dan Keyes District Administrator Mendocino Coast Recreation and Parks District 300 South Lincoln St. Fort Bragg, CA 95437 Subject: General comments in opposition to the Mendocino Coast Recreation and Parks District (MCRPD) plan to develop an Off-Highway Vehicle Regional Park on a 586 acre property owned by MCRPD near Summers Lane, east of Fort Bragg Dear Mr. Keyes: I write to express my serious and complete opposition to this current proposal. My wife and I are long-time Mendocino Coast residents and taxpayers (over 70 years here between us). We are passionate about land-use issues, particularly the protection of fragile coastal area lands. We do not reside in the area near the land in question, though we have close friends who do. We strongly believe that any recreational use of this public land should benefit the majority of coast residents/taxpayers and fully protect and preserve the land itself. We believe that the current proposal will neither benefit the majority of coast residents, nor will it protect the land from further degradation To begin, I cite the MCRPD website which states the following about the land at the proposed park site: “This property is owned by Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District (MCRPD) and consists of 586 acres including much of the Newman Gulch Watershed, the municipal water source for the city of Fort Bragg. Unique habitats exist here, including sphagnum bogs and 150 acres of Mendocino Cypress Pygmy Forest. These areas need to be protected from damage.” “This land is currently open to the public for passive recreation including walking and hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding. It is not open for public off-highway vehicle use now.” Following is a brief summary of our reasons for opposing this proposal: Main Concerns: 1. This public land is in need of the fullest protection, as the MCRPD website itself clearly points-out. It is common knowledge that this land has been neglected, abused and degraded for years and is in poor condition. Land degradation caused by off-highway vehicle use is exceedingly common, as is well known due to extensive studies in numerous states. Even under relatively controlled circumstances, these vehicles are inherently destructive to the land and the habitat. Though much more could be said about this issue. We'll simply quote the local Sierra Club, in a current comment on this proposal, and attach a Sierra Club document regarding off-highway use of motorized vehicles: “The Sierra Club feels that designating the entire park as an OHV Park will discourage all other activities and cause unintended destruction of the sensitive habitats (Pygmy Forest and Northern Bishop Pine Forest) as well as threatening sediment pollution of the Newman Gulch headwaters and reservoir. The sensitive habitat areas also include wetlands and a sphagnum bog.” Document attached: “Off-Road Use of Motorized Vehicles,” adopted by the Sierra Club Board of Directors, May 7, 1988, 3 pages 2. Off-highway vehicles are intrinsically intrusive, noisy and disturbing for many folks, even if exhaust systems are properly muffled. Their engines also pollute the air, to a much higher degree than most cars, which have highly engineered, highly regulated pollution control systems. These problems, as well as others associated with off-highway vehicle use (like generation of dust clouds) make other recreational uses of the park site problematic. They also create serious nuisance/disturbance problems for those residences adjacent to or close-by the park site. The noise issue--the ongoing buzz-drone-whine-moan-growl--of these motorized vehicles, especially if multiple vehicles were in use at the site-- could prove to be extremely upsetting and unnerving to area residents, who currently live in relatively peaceful and quiet neighborhoods. My wife and I can both imagine that if such a park site use were proposed near our home, we would be anxious and alarmed, even disheartened. We would vigorously oppose such a proposal. We moved to the Mendocino Coast, as many others have done, to enjoy the peace and quiet of countryside home life. 3. Off-highway vehicles are inherently dangerous, a commonly known fact. Single or multiple-vehicle accidents can result in serious injuries or death. If a certain percentage off-highway drivers are operating under the influence of drugs or alcohol—as is sadly very likely-- risk rises dramatically. If children are allowed to drive such vehicles, even those who have undergone training, the risk of accidents and related injuries rises accordingly. Regarding children's use of off-highway vehicles like ATV's, James Perrin, past President of the American Academy of Pediatrics states: “Children are not developmentally capable of operating these heavy, complex machines. The American Academy of Pediatrics warns all parents that no child under the age of 16 should drive or ride an ATV.” From: “Are All-Terrain Vehicles Safe Toys For Children?” Jennifer Abel, Consumer Affairs, April 24, 2014 As to these issues, Judge Anthony P. Calisi, writing about legal liability issues, notes the following regarding ATV's, the ubiquitous off-highway vehicle: “Of all off-road vehicles, all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs, result in the highest number of injuries and fatalities each year. ATVs come in three-, four- and even six-wheel versions. Their speeds can reach up to 45 miles an hour and they can weigh up to 1,000 pounds. Most states don’t require a driver’s license to operate one, so drivers are often 15 years old or younger. An untrained, inexperienced or intoxicated driver can easily flip one over on top of himself or his passengers. Although some new ATVs have seatbelts, there are few other safety features. Common accidents involve rollovers and collisions with other vehicles and solid objects. Injuries include lacerations, contusions, abrasions, minor burns, and whiplash. More serious injuries are broken bones, back and spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, skull fractures, second- and third-degree burns, and death.” From: “Off-Road Vehicle Accident Settlements,” Judge Anthony P. Calisi (retired), Website-Injury Claim Coach These are very serious issues that would have to be accounted for in planning and execution. They raise the question of the need for full-time supervision/monitoring/enforcement at the park site by trained staff. This of course becomes an ongoing—and no doubt difficult--funding issue. Closely associated is the issue of legal liability for any off-highway vehicle accidents. One questions whether the MCRPD has fully considered these issues, especially the ongoing funding needed to address on-site staffing, user safety, as well as legal risks/responsibilities/costs. 4. A troubling issue regarding this proposal concerns ineffective noticing of the public for related meetings. This issue began at the initial application in 2014/2015, with complaints by interested parties, including residents of nearby homes (noted on the California Recreation Alliance comment website for that time period), that noticing had not been effectively provided. We are also aware that a recent EIR-related meeting was apparently not noticed in a reasonable, common-sense manner easily accessible to the public and interested parties. As a result, some folks who wished to attend could not do so. In the interests of due diligence and fairness, direct notice (in the form of letters, flyers or even brief in-person contact) to all residences potentially affected by this proposal should be given prior to any future meetings. We urge those responsible for noticing to insure this critical task is done ethically and completely. Only then can all concerned parties know about the proposal's details and voice their views and concerns. Summary: This proposal appears to be a special-interest proposal primarily benefiting a very small percentage of the Mendocino Coast population—those who ride on or drive off-highway vehicles. There are those—especially the folks who live in homes close-by the proposed park—who would suffer significant harm from this primary use. They would be harmed especially by the substantial air and noise pollution caused by such vehicles. The land itself, already harmed by many years of neglect and abuse, would certainly suffer further degradation over time from such vehicle use. This use of the park site, due largely to the noise and air pollution caused by such vehicles, would greatly constrain all other recreational uses of this public land, such as hiking, bicycling, picnic use, camping, and other low-impact uses by the general population. Off-highway vehicle use, and the other recreational uses listed here, are in essence mutually exclusive. Folks who want to relax in various ways, enjoying a peaceful, natural park setting, cannot do so in the nearby presence of motorized vehicles being used for recreational purposes. We assert, instead, that this public land should be used to benefit a far greater number of Mendocino Coast citizens, young and old. The park should offer the many and diverse recreational activities cited in your website. The park site should not be opened to the use of off-highway vehicles. Thank you for your attention to these concerns. Please understand that the Mendocino Coast public will be closely watching your decisions in this matter. Respectfully. Chuck Dunbar - 3/23/2018


The Sierra Club, Mendocino Group, welcomes the opportunity to comment on this proposal. The application by the California Recreation Alliance for Education and Safety reveals that the proposed site is already being used for OHV rides with no environmental review having been done. On page 2 of the grant, CRA states that "In 2017, we began having Birthday Party classes. Classes have been hugely successful with full attendance for every class. Each of these classes exposes children to the trails located on the [MCRPD] property...The ability to use the facilities....has allowed us to continue to offer classes without charge. Also on page 2, CRA states that, " 'Our Trail Riding Basics for Kids' Classes have been hugely successful, with full attendance for every class. Each of these classes exposes children to the trails located on the [MCRPD] property. These activities on the MCRPD property on unstable roads and through sensitive habitat need to stop until environmental review is complete. The "safety" grant under Item C, "Identification of Needs" on page 2, states that "In 2017, California ranked number 2 [for ATV fatalities], with a cumulative total of 714 (1982-2016). However, the number of children under the age of 16 killed in ATV accidents has declined dramatically, from 35% in 2014 to 20% in 2016." The latter figures given are percentages; therefore, they are difficult to interpret. Has there been a decline in percentages because there are more adult riders and/or fewer 'under-16' riders? We need to know the absolute numbers as well as something like, "number of fatalities-per-miles-riden-on-OHVs", for the numbers to be meaningful in any way. Item C continues with injury rates and states that "The number of injuries related to ATV accidents for children under the age of 16 increased to 26,800 from 26,700 in 2015." Assuming the first number is for 2016, that is an increase of 1,100 injuries. Again, because we don't know how many children are riding OHVs for what distances, nor of what the injuries consist, this is hard to interpret. I think we can safely say, however, that this is a dangerous sport for children and not one we want encouraged by MCRPD. Clearly MCRPD's focus for the use of their property should be on activities for youth that are more inherently safe. Linda Perkins - 4/1/2018


In addition to the early comments that the Dorothy King Young Chapter of the California Native Plant Society submitted in regards to grant application G17-04-54-S01, we wish to add the following: At the heart of our concerns, is a fundamental lack of scientific understanding about the rare plant communities on the MCRPD property and of the impacts that are occurring with continued OHV use, including training activities. It appears that what the CRA is calling “pygmy forest” is a narrowly defined patch of low stature vegetation that is shown on proposed OHV park development maps as only occurring on the western portion of the property. This environmental determination appears to be based on out-of-date surveys conducted for a 2006 EIR for a previously proposed MCRPD golf course. When in fact, a rare (and legally protected) vegetation type, which is dominated by the Mendocino Pygmy cypress (Heperocyparis pygmaea), occurs on an estimated 70% of the property (based on recent vegetation classification surveys conducted by CDFW). The “pygmy forest” is actually both the shorter forest type that occurs on Blacklock soils and taller versions that occur on better soils. “Pygmy” cypress is still a listed rare plant, whether it occurs as a tall or short tree. As we have written in our comments, continued use of OHV vehicles on the roads, and the visible recent attempts to drain sections of severely eroding road surfaces by using heavy equipment, are compounding cumulative impacts by changing the hydrology, exacerbating severe downcutting, and further mobilizing highly erosive soils. Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodland is characterized by shallow, saturated soils, and the species that grow there have evolved and are dependent upon the wetland environment that is being impacted by OHV use. This is why we have continued to recommend that no additional OHV related activities occur on the property, at least until current protocol-level surveys, as defined by CDFW are completed and avoidance measures can be implemented as is required under CEQA. We have sincerely offered to provide site-specific scientific information and to share our expertise in helping to plan for other uses that may be more environmentally appropriate for the 586 acres. We fear that misinformation, based on a lack of scientific understanding and documentation, is being used to perpetuate a false characterization of the vegetation on the property as one of being highly impacted from former logging activities and illegal OHV use. The majority of the property’s acreage, in fact, supports rare habitats that should be protected and on which meaningful restoration activities can successfully be conducted. Renee Pasquinelli - 4/2/2018


As a longtime resident of Madera County specifically the Oakhurst area I have never seen such devastation due to bark beetle infestations and the number of dead trees falling onto roads and trails on a weekly basis. The Stewards of the Sierra are the hardest working most dedicated group of boots on the ground individuals I have ever had the pleasure to meet. I have reviewed their application for grant funding and believe they should be fully funded. Edward Mann - 3/7/2018


These updated maps are an absolute necessity for public education and direction on the proper routes for legal access. Grant should be funded. Edward Mann - 3/7/2018


This is a great grant idea and will greatly benefit the riding community. I would however, like to see a greater partnership between the applicant and Forest for data collection & sharing, and app development. Deb Schoenberg - 3/13/2018


I've been living in the Santa Barbara area and riding OHVs for the past 5 years. When traveling to areas like Jawbone Canyon or the Eastern Sierras, I've found the CTUC maps to be completely indispensable to having a successful trip. With an up-to-date map, I am able to determine suitable rides for my groups' size and ablity, plan rides across harsh, remote terrain and prepare for emergency situations that may arise while riding an OHV. One of the best features of these up to the date maps is that they can be loaded in an Android app, so I can quickly and easily see my GPS location overlayed directly on the map on my phone, without any cell service. However, when I'm riding near my home, I have to do without any of these features - The Los Padres map is 7 years old, several fires have occurred in that timespan, and since the map is so old, it cannot be loaded in my phone. If an emergency situation were to happen, I would not be able to find the quickest way out. Many of the riding areas contained in this map (such as Ballinger and Hungry Valley) are growing more and more popular with families and less experienced riders. This updated map is valuable tool in helping ensure everyone can enjoy their day and find their way back to their car safely. I would strongly suggest approving this grant. James McGuire - 3/13/2018


I ride a lot in Los Padres and would recommend updating the maps. It would reduce the number of search and rescue calls for lost adventurers... That alone would make this worthwhile Richard Tennant - 3/13/2018


I live in the Santa Barbara area and have been riding OHVs throughout Southern California for about 8 years now. During that time, a riding buddy of mine discovered some of the maps from CTUC for the Jawbone Canyon area and they have been an invaluable asset in terms of convenience and, much more importantly, rider safety. Unforunately there is only an outdated and unusable map available for the Los Padres area, and I can personally say that the riding community and emergency services alike would benefit greatly from the approval of this grant. Colin van Ysseldyk - 3/14/2018


Please support this organization as they add to the enjoyment of of our parks and outdoors, as well as providing a safer environment for the flora and fauna and humans. Butch - 3/15/2018


Please support this organization as they add to the enjoyment of of our parks and outdoors, as well as providing a safer environment for the flora and fauna and humans. Butch Meyner - 3/15/2018


Funding the Stewards of the Sierra National Forest Road and Trail maintenance grant is in the public’s best interest for several reasons including the safety and security of any and all visitors to the Sierra National Forest this year. Due to the high tree mortality rate, trees are falling like flies in the forest. They fall and block the roads frequently that tourists, travelers, and off road vehicles all use to go to and from many lakes, rivers, and hiking spots. The trails and fire roads can easily get blocked leaving travelers and off road patrons trapped with no easy access to get out of the forest. The Stewards are seen frequently clearing these trees from many roads and trails keeping access clear for everyone in and more importantly out of the forest. To further this end for public safety on the OHV trails, the Stewards replace trail markers, repair deeply rutted and dangerous roads, replace broken signs and road markers, and repair and post signs that delineate where OHV riders/drivers are allowed to recreate and post signs to mark where they are not. The Sierra National Forest is safer for the people that enjoy its many recreational opportunities because the Stewards work so diligently to make it that way and complete work that the Forest Service just does not have the manpower or time to complete. The entire OHV and off-roading experience is improved thanks to their hard work for all. Suzanne Rice - 3/16/2018


Please support this organization as they add to the enjoyment of of our parks and outdoors. They also provide a safe, natural environment for us to enjoy. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


The area between Mammoth Lakes and June Lake is a golden opportunity for OHV users with many miles of trails for all skill levels. This area attracts OHV visitors from all over the State. Adequate signage and trail maintenance will help keep the users on the legal trails. There is an abundance of users and trails but we need to keep them on the proper trails. Mike Johnston - 3/21/2018


UTMC supports collaboration between CTUC and the Sequoia National Forest to provide additional resources to SQF. In these difficult times for the Forest Service, strong partnerships are necessary to making up for and augmenting any deficits in hiring personnel to maintain the OHV system. CTUC has a long history of successful grants management and successful partnerships with this forest. United Trail Maintainers of California - 3/24/2018


I’m writing this letter of support of the Stewards of the Stanislaus members’ wish to provide volunteer work with for Sierra National Forest (SNF) to improve OHV opportunities for the greater public. The Stewards of the SNF have been continuously growing in membership and I support their request for grant funding to provide tools, supplies, road and trail directional signs, route markers, safety gear and equipment to support their volunteer efforts up in the Stanislaus National Forest. The SNF need as much help as possible for road and trail maintenance. Much work is needed to insure that legal OHV trails and forest roads are kept open for public OHV use and to reduce potential adverse conditions. The continued reduction of the Forest Service road and trail maintenance budget has caused roads and trails to deteriorate to an unacceptable condition. Lack of proper maintenance has led to drainage structure failure and water quality degradation. Brush encroachment and downed trees on some roads and trails has begun to restrict motorized access and use. Many of these roads and trails provide access to and from developed campgrounds, dispersed camping areas, and recreational destination points. This work activity will be focused on roads and trails that provide a variety of motorized uses. Trails provide varied levels of difficulty from easy, to difficult, to more difficult. This project will improve motorized access, water quality, signage, and enhance the overall OHV experience within the SNF. The SNF have performed several hundred volunteer hours of invaluable time each year toward maintenance activities on roads and trails that have contributed to increased water quality, decreased soil erosion and improved OHV recreational access. They have installed or repaired many trail signs and removed innumerable bags of trash from the forest. They have also repaired vandalism and removed graffiti from natural and manmade objects within the forest. With approval of this grant request they are hoping to take our commitment to the next level by providing a long term product of work to support the SNF and the OHV community. Michael McGarity - 3/27/2018


I use two CTUC map apps now, San Bernardino National Forest and Ocotillo Wells. They are both very good and I appreciate them, having relied on the SBNF one on some trips I did recently. I hope CTUC can be funded so I can have better maps to explore the world with. Ed Stovin - 4/1/2018


This (on-going) effort should be approved and funded. Budget issues in the INF have led to a situation were numerous trails and access roads are in urgent need to maintenance to maintain accessibility. Water rutting and brush incursion is especially acute in many areas. This proposal, using largely volunteers will significantly improve the rapidly degrading recreational capability in the INF. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


The project should be approved and funded. Re-establishing and maintaining the "mobile app" for both iPhone and Android devices is essential for the general availability and use of the CTUC maps. The CTUC maps are a key component to assuring OHV users know the approved routes as well as how to safety use them. The paper maps are very useful and should be continued but, needless to say, without electronic availability a lot of potential users will be missed. John Shepherd - 4/2/2018


This facility is always professionally maintained and safe for riders of all ages. The staff is courteous, safety conscious and keep the restrooms clean. Grant money well spent, keep up the good work. Owen Fitzsimon - 3/26/2018


$647,818.00 dollars. That is money better spent being given directly to the El Dorado Forestry department. The forestry department could do all of this + 3x more at that price. This is a blatant waste of funds being handed over to the Center for something that is really a non issue. Jason Padgett - 3/6/2018


This grant application seems to be a very high cost for the work being done. In this same grant cycle, the USFS, El Dorado district is to restore 28.99 acres at a cost of $190,073.00 This is a cost of $6,556.50/acre. They are not using volunteers either. The Center is restoring 10-20 acres at a cost of $647,818.00. Even at their best - this is $32,390.90/acre. This seems a very poor return on investment. This money would be much better served going directly to the EL Dorado Forest Service, as there restoration cost per acre is 4.94 times better then the Centers cost. If the Center can get their costs under control to a much more realistic value per acre, then they should have funding. Until then, they should not receive funding or they should only receive the USFS established cost of $6,556.00 per acre, for a total of $131,120.00 and verification a full 20 acres have been restored. Sean Cowan - 3/6/2018


This is an appalling cost for restoring a grand total of 20 acres in the forest. That amounts to over $32,000 per acre of restoration that the proposal cites. In reading the proposal, it does not appear to include any volunteer labor, but certainly does benefit The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservancy and their bank account. I see duplicated estimates for superviso rial positions that seem to overlap each other, one for $56k and $95k....and that is an observation of one portion of their proposal. I'm very confident that a deeper dive will expose more cost overlaps and over charges. My immediate concern is that the CSNC is lining their pockets and their contractors and making a profit by fabricating work when the USFS can undertake that kind of project by using their own employees, volunteers, and seasonal employees. Simple math shows the CSNC wants over $32,000 per acre versus the USFS doing a similar restoration project for just over $6,500 per acre. The proposal from the CSNC does mot make any economical sense at all when you compare the two dollar amounts. My vote is to deny the CSNC and the overly inflated proposal, the USFS can do much better.. Thank you, Frank Hock Napa, CA. Frank Hock - 3/7/2018


Sections A, B, C, and D provide no reference control of the scope submitted to perform. 1. What reference is being used to verify APPROVED routes and UNAPPROVED routes for OHV usage? 2. What reference is being used to IDENTIFY OHV presence or absence? 3. What reference is being used to measure impact of OHV use, approved, unapproved, damaged, and expected? 4. What reference is being used to identify OHV use from other uses, approved or other? 5. What reference is being used for appropriate and applicable restoration methods? 6. What is the reference for identifying severity level of disturbance? 7. What reference is being used to identify contributing activities that impact an OHV area? 8. What reference is being used for monitoring methods? Carl Limpus - 3/7/2018


Looking even further into this, this would be a major misuse of OHV funds paid for by the OHV community in the State. OHV funds are supposed to be used to maintain current trail systems and open new. Not to observe conditions where a group "suspects" illegal OHV is taking place in non OHV areas. Jason Padgett - 3/7/2018


On page 2 #C, no specific sites identified. How can monitoring by a third party occur if sites are not identified? In fact, they intend to monitor themselves! Wouldn't that lead to possible fraud and misuse of taxpayer funds? In the past, has this group submitted proper valid grant follow up to the Program? Cost of grant oversight by their own individual is way to expensive. Working only 4 or 5 days a week already provides plenty of time to do paperwork. As to public notice of the Placerville meeting in February, which drew a total of 2 persons, how was this public notice conveyed? I am an interested person with a stake in OHV and in the King Fire restoration (my land burned). I heard nothing about it. Who was responsible for informing the interested public? I have regular contact with Mark Egbert; he never mentioned it. A huge organization that works side by side with El Dorado County in managing off road use, namely RTF, hasn't mentioned the meeting. I say the notice was not made in earnest and another meeting needs to be held before tax payer money is used in this random way. It is an irresponsible use of taxpayer money to fund such a small project in such a loose way to carry on with an effort that the organization admits has not solved any problems. They are an ineffective group that appears to just be asking to be paid by the people for doing what they want to do. Nancy DeRodeff - 3/7/2018


In our current economical environment I personally can see much better use for the over 600,00 dollars requested in this grant. I would also like to see a public announcement and follow up to the impacts and success of the previous grants which this Non Profit was granted. It would be of my opinion that the USFS is far better equipped to take on such projects after all this is in our forest for which the USFS are the caretakers. Judging by previous grants issued to this Non Profit it is clear there seems to be no follow up to the actual success or effectiveness of these monies and projects. We seem to be blindly distributing hard earned tax payers money to very unworthy causes. I strongly disagree with this application for grant funds and feel this money could be used in far better places for the improvement of our public lands. Tim Green - 3/7/2018


In my opinion this grant application seems to be a very high cost for the work being done. In this same grant cycle, the USFS, El Dorado district is to restore 28.99 acres at a cost of $190,073.00 This is a cost of $6,556.50/acre. They are not using volunteers either. The Center is restoring 10-20 acres at a cost of $647,818.00. Even at their best - this is $32,390.90/acre. This is a very poor return on investment. The money would be much better served going directly to the EL Dorado Forest Service, as there restoration cost per acre is 4.94 times better then the Centers cost. If the Center can get their costs under control to a much more realistic value per acre, then they should have funding. Until then, they should not receive funding or they should only receive the USFS established cost of $6,556.00 per acre, for a total of $131,120.00 and verification a full 20 acres have been restored. It is grant application #: 68-108508 Chris Cowan - 3/7/2018


I beleive this grant request is an overreach of misappropriated funds. The actions of years past by the CSNC do not provide any results. Managemant by closure as we all know is not fair or by any means a powerful tool to restore natural wetlands roadways trails and public land. Public land must be accessable to all and by the vehicle of choice wether it be a horse,hiking shoes,jeep,dirtbike,etc. This is GOD's country and is a gift to us all.Patrick McCuiston - 3/7/2018


As a OHV user in Eldorado National Forest, and a person interested in keeping our public lands open to the public, I DO NOT recommend that the CSNC be awarded this grant for the following two reasons: 1. In a previous grant which was similar to this one, grant money was awarded to an individual who bought his own vehicle from himself, and was paid by the mile to drive around and report on OHV activity in Eldorado. He essentially pocketed the grant money awarded to himself. Many people in the OHV community have seen him driving this vehicle for personal use. Is this the way grant funding is supposed to be used? I have used my own 4x4 vehicle on many forest work parties. Can I buy it from myself? 2. This organization, guised as an "environmental" group, is really not interested in being stewards of public lands. This is an elitist group with long track record of being a anti-OHV group. Our National Forests are public lands and need to be managed for all different types of forest users, from hikers to equestrians to OHV users. The forest belongs to all of us. This group's main focus is to push OHV users completely out of the forest. We have already lost thousands of miles of routes and campsites in Eldorado from route designation....and then we lost access during the wet weather season, which has funneled all the OHV users during that time period to essentially one area: Morman Emigrant trail. It's like a football team only playing a football game in a 5 square yard section of the entire football field. That section of field would get way more torn up than if the team was spread out all over the entire field. Now this group will "focus" on reporting on those small sections of forest now packed with users like North-South road? Their sole purpose of this grant is to "catch" OHV users who have been backed into this corner. I was told years ago that the maps of the forest are supposed to be "fluid" meaning that we close routes that may lead to resource damage, but we also work to OPEN routes back up. Which routes in the forest have been opened back up? The ideology of this group is to CLOSE the forest to certain types of forest users, not to create more recreational opportunities. I am an environmentalist. I was raised and literally grew up in Yosemite Valley, and I have studied Muir my entire life. Muir wanted the public to have access to the forest and the mountains. This group wants the exact opposite. I will leave you with the opening sentence of a letter from John Muir to Roosevelt written on September 9th, 1907.. " I am anxious that the Yosemite National Park may be saved from all sorts of commercialism and mark's of man's work, OTHER THAN THE ROADS.......required to make it's wonders and blessing available." Please help to keep our public lands public ands do not fund this grant request. Kurt Schneider - 3/7/2018


I am an avid OHV user in El Dorado County and have been so for the past 21 years. I strongly disagree with giving any grant money to the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation. They have done almost nothing to repair damage to non OHV areas. Furthermore Karen Schambach is openly against OHV use and is consistently trying to get more and more areas closed to OHV use. I believe the grant money should be given to another group that will actually use it for what it is intended for. Matthew Jeffrey - 3/7/2018


I am an avid OHV user in El Dorado County and have been so for the past 21 years. I strongly disagree with giving any grant money to the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation. They have done almost nothing to repair damage to non OHV areas. Furthermore Karen Schambach is openly against OHV use and is consistently trying to get more and more areas closed to OHV use. I believe the grant money should be given to another group that will actually use it for what it is intended for. Matthew Jeffrey - 3/7/2018


I am an avid OHV user in El Dorado County and have been so for the past 21 years. I strongly disagree with giving any grant money to the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation. They have done almost nothing to repair damage to non OHV areas. Furthermore Karen Schambach is openly against OHV use and is consistently trying to get more and more areas closed to OHV use. I believe the grant money should be given to another group that will actually use it for what it is intended for. Matthew Jeffrey - 3/7/2018


When the "Triple As" (Anti-Access A-holes) apply for a $350,000 grant from the State to close trails in Eldo with boulders, and drive around taking pics of "resource damage" and people off trail to build a case against OHVs.....while paying themselves out of that grant $37 an hour and getting .55 cents a mile... This is the public comment I attach to that grant proposal: As a OHV user in Eldorado National Forest, and a person interested in keeping our public lands open to the public, I DO NOT recommend that the CSNC be awarded this grant for the following two reasons: 1. In a previous grant which was similar to this one, grant money was awarded to an individual who bought his own vehicle from himself, and was paid by the mile to drive around and report on OHV activity in Eldorado. He essentially pocketed the grant money awarded to himself. Many people in the OHV community have seen him driving this vehicle for personal use. Is this the way grant funding is supposed to be used? I have used my own 4x4 vehicle on many forest work parties. Can I buy it from myself? 2. This organization, guised as an "environmental" group, is really not interested in being stewards of public lands. This is an elitist group with long track record of being a anti-OHV group. Our National Forests are public lands and need to be managed for all different types of forest users, from hikers to equestrians to OHV users. The forest belongs to all of us. This group's main focus is to push OHV users completely out of the forest. Brian Mulhollen - 3/7/2018


I oppose the awarding of this grant to the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation which is run by Ms. Karen Schambach. In recent years CSNC and Ms. Schambach have attempted through the use various grants and the utilization of nefarious 'sciences' to close legal access to public routes in El Dorado County. This group has a state goal on their web site to down size the national forest road system. The grant application funds a full time employee to monitor activity with no purpose tha close designated routes. This individual has no law enforcement capability. In addition there are funds to pay volunteers where volunteers off set or match provided funds. The application states that less than 10% is a match. The application states that failure to fund will adversely affect streams, soils, sensitive areas and species. Monitoring will not protect these items but funding law enforcement would. this grant will not protect these areas but provide the applicant the means to pay employees. In addition the grant does not provide for restoration of damaged areas just monitors OHV activities that may be off designated routes. Steve Egbert - 3/7/2018


In light of the knowledge that Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation has applied for this grant I wish to bring to light several issues. !. This group is Anti OHV and is applying for funds under dubious means. 2. CSNC members include Karen Schambach who is strongly anti OHV and is a detriment to the OHV community. 3. It is under false pretenses that this grant is applied for and should not be considered as it would do more harm than good to the OHV community. CSVC is an Anti OHV group. It should not be considered for this grant.Thomas Gibney - 3/8/2018


This grant application seems to be a very high cost for the work being done. In this same grant cycle, the USFS, El Dorado district is to restore 28.99 acres at a cost of $190,073.00 This is a cost of $6,556.50/acre. They are not using volunteers either. The Center is restoring 10-20 acres at a cost of $647,818.00. Even at their best - this is $32,390.90/acre. This seems a very poor return on investment. This money would be much better served going directly to the EL Dorado Forest Service, as there restoration cost per acre is 4.94 times better then the Centers cost. If the Center can get their costs under control to a much more realistic value per acre, then they should have funding. Until then, they should not receive funding or they should only receive the USFS established cost of $6,556.00 per acre, for a total of $131,120.00 and verification a full 20 acres have been restored. This is way to excessive use of Tax payer money, that could be better spent buy even hiring private contractors to restore the land Rusty Folena - 3/8/2018


I oppose this selection of this grant for the following reasons. The individuals submitting the grant request have typically been non-OHV friendly, and use previous grant funds to highlight the supposed bad things that OHV users can or might do. They say their grant is for OHV, but did not go into enough detail to highlight if they are for or against OHV use on the forest. Todd Ockert - 3/9/2018


As a OHV user in Eldorado National Forest, and a person interested in keeping our public lands open to the public, I DO NOT recommend that the CSNC be awarded this grant for the following two reasons: 1. In a previous grant which was similar to this one, grant money was awarded to an individual who bought his own vehicle from himself, and was paid by the mile to drive around and report on OHV activity in Eldorado. He essentially pocketed the grant money awarded to himself. Many people in the OHV community have seen him driving this vehicle for personal use. Is this the way grant funding is supposed to be used? I have used my own 4x4 vehicle on many forest work parties. Can I buy it from myself? 2. This organization, guised as an "environmental" group, is really not interested in being stewards of public lands. This is an elitist group with long track record of being a anti-OHV group. Our National Forests are public lands and need to be managed for all different types of forest users, from hikers to equestrians to OHV users. The forest belongs to all of us. This group's main focus is to push OHV users completely out of the forest. We have already lost thousands of miles of routes and campsites in Eldorado from route designation....and then we lost access during the wet weather season, which has funneled all the OHV users during that time period to essentially one area: Morman Emigrant trail. It's like a football team only playing a football game in a 5 square yard section of the entire football field. That section of field would get way more torn up than if the team was spread out all over the entire field. Now this group will "focus" on reporting on those small sections of forest now packed with users like North-South road? Their sole purpose of this grant is to "catch" OHV users who have been backed into this corner. I was told years ago that the maps of the forest are supposed to be "fluid" meaning that we close routes that may lead to resource damage, but we also work to OPEN routes back up. Which routes in the forest have been opened back up? The ideology of this group is to CLOSE the forest to certain types of forest users, not to create more recreational opportunities. I am an environmentalist. I was raised and literally grew up in Yosemite Valley, and I have studied Muir my entire life. Muir wanted the public to have access to the forest and the mountains. This group wants the exact opposite. I will leave you with the opening sentence of a letter from John Muir to Roosevelt written on September 9th, 1907.. " I am anxious that the Yosemite National Park may be saved from all sorts of commercialism and mark's of man's work, OTHER THAN THE ROADS.......required to make it's wonders and blessing available." Please help to keep our public lands public ands do not fund this grant request. Larisa Atkinson - 3/10/2018


Granting OHV funds to this group is counterintuitive to the OHMVR mission statement. This group and their president/CEO Karen Schambach have a decades long history of being outspoken anti OHV activists. The projects this group is requesting funding for would be better fulfilled by the US forest service. Dave - 3/13/2018


I DO NOT SUPPORT giving this grant. Gross misuse of OHV funds. This group is not protecting or conserving public lands. Ankur Pai - 3/13/2018


I do not support this grant request. The requesters disingenuously represent themselves as protectors of the environment while lobbying in support of wealthy landowners. It would be a bad thing to support lobbying efforts from this grant request. Sean Casey - 3/13/2018


My family does not support this grant application. This group is misrepresenting themselves as protectors of the environment when they are really lobyists for wealthy landowners. Antonio Ceccato - 3/14/2018


My family does not support this grant application. This group is misrepresenting themselves as protectors of the environment when they are really lobyists for wealthy landowners. Antonio Ceccato - 3/14/2018


I support the current Grant proposal set forth. Marion Riese - 3/18/2018


I have been a resident of El Dorado County, which has more public land than private land, for almost thirty years and for almost as long I have been a member of the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation formally Friends Aware of Wildlife Needs. For all these years in many ways we have been working to protect and conserve these public lands. For the last few years we have focused on providing protection and restoration to the forest where the unauthorized off-road motor vehicles have created washouts and destruction of sensitive areas. By making these areas not assessable to off-road vehicles the areas are healing and being restored. We are a frugal bunch. Lots of it is our own free labor, donations and fund raisers, but we have equipment and paid labor costs. We are applying for a grant to help us with these costs. We are a good investment. Please grant our request for funds to carry on our work in our El Dorado Forest. Mae Harms - 3/18/2018


To Whom it may concern, I am writing in support of the grant that is being considered for Sierra Nevada Conservation. This group has been a huge help providing the Forest Service with much needed support and manpower in helping with environmental projects. They also support the local businesses by purchasing supplies for these projects locally. Sierra Nevada Conservation has worked hard for years for the benefit of all who live in this community, and they have earned the respect and gratitude of many on the divide. I have lived in Georgetown foe over 26 years and have benefitted from their hard work. Please consider these things when awarding this grant. Alexandra Elliott - 3/19/2018


This project focuses on restoring sites impacted by motor vehicle travel off of designated roads and trails within the ENF and deterring the creation of new routes or areas located in areas heavily used for OHV recreation. It has been shown that in areas where unauthorized travel is quickly closed and restored, unintentional or inadvertent illegal travel is avoided and illegal travel does not expand. Their success in identifying and restoring this destruction should continue and I am in favor of the current proposal. Debra Ayres - 3/22/2018


I support this grant. This grant is for THREE years, or $215,946 per YEAR; 10% of this funding comes from membership dues, donations and fundraising. Several local organizations provide volunteer workers on restoration days to keep costs under control. As a reference, El Dorado County is asking for $259,537 of OHV funding for a SINGLE year to monitor and maintain a SINGLE 19 mile OHV trail – the Rubicon. CSNC will be monitoring over 220 miles of road, spread over 4 counties and restoring about 100 sites EACH year. That’s about $2,200 per site per year. Seems like a lot of bang for the buck and I support this proposal. Thank you for reading my message, Annie Walker - 3/22/2018


I have been involved as a volunteer with CSNC for the past three years. I have been able to visit new areas of the El Dorado National Forest and work with other friendly, dedicated volunteers to help reverse resource damages inflicted on our public lands by negligent OHV activities. A good esprit de corps has developed amongst the volunteers, staff, and the wonderful young Americorps enrollees. My hours spent working on several sites in the three ranger districts have been very worthwhile and rewarding as a way of enjoying my natural resource lands, I encourage your agency to continue the grants which have resulted in such positive gains. Thank you john kipping - 3/23/2018


I am writing to express my support for the CSNC restoration grant proposal. I have volunteered for a few CSNC projects, and found them to be well- planned and well- run. For instance, denying illegal (and only illegal) access to OHV's in sensitive areas by creating natural physical barriers (like "fences" made of fallen tree branches) is proving to be an effective, inexpensive, and mostly unobtrusive way to protect forest resources. In 2017 alone, CSNC identified and restored 110 sites that were being impacted by illegal OHV use. In so doing, CSNC has protected and improved our water quality, wildlife habitat, genetic diversity and general forest fertility. This benefits all of us, today and in the future. The three year grant CSNC is requesting breaks down to about $216,000 per year, to provide continued monitoring and restoration of the illegal resource damage that is occurring all over the Eldorado. That comes to less than $2,200 per restored site. Financially, it does not get much better than that; approving this grant proposal makes good economic sense. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Shellie Perry - 3/25/2018


Dear Sixto Fernandez and the OHV Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program Grant Review Team, I am writing in support of the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation's (CSNC) 2017/2018 Restoration Grant Application. As a member of CSNC, I have continued my support over the years because I have been grateful for the incremental success of the organization in accomplishing their mission to protect the ecological integrity and beauty of Sierra Nevada and Eldorado County by engaging the public in educational projects, with volunteer activities and with various partnerships with the US Forest Service. Through the OHV 2016/2017 Restoration Grant, Karen Schambach, her staff, their tireless AmeriCorps volunteers and dozens of community volunteers were able to restore 110 sites and protect cultural sites, riparian areas, places with rare botanical resources, meadow and water sources from illegal OHV trespass. With renewed Restoration Funding from the OHV Program, CSNC will continue for another three years to monitor areas within the Eldorado National Forest where OHV travel off designated routes has occurred. They will be able to continue to restore impacted areas identified and repair previously restored sites. Field experience on public lands has demonstrated that without follow-up monitoring and repair of previous restoration for more than a few years, some of the protection accomplished can be undone. The outstanding performance and outcomes of the past three years can continue with the approval and awarding the full amount of CSNC's 2017/2018 Grant Request. One change I would suggest to the line amounts of funds requested is that CSNC has underestimated the amount of funding needed per mile for gasoline. I recommend that the Grant be changed to request at least $3.85 per gallon gas for travel to allow for the fluctuations in the oil and gas market over the next three years. I noticed that is the amount that Friends of Jawbone have requested in their grant application. Thank you very much for the opportunity to submit a comment in support of full funding of the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation's 2017/2018 Restoration Grant request. Sincerely, Terry R. Weiner Former Conservation and Projects Coordinator Desert Protective Council Ms. Terry Weiner - 3/26/2018


I strongly support this grant proposal. The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation (CSNC) is proposing much needed monitoring and restoration work to address damage to sensitive resources caused by illegal off-road vehicle use. This is work that is consistent with the approved Travel Management Plan approved by the Forest Service in 2013. CSNC has a proven track record on identifying and restoring sites damaged by illegal OHV traffic. Since 2014 they have received annual funding from OHV Recreation and successfully monitored and repaired damage due to illegal OHV use at around 100 sites per year. These results are summarized in the present grant proposal (page 2, Section C) and in past grant proposals. Given this track record, the 3-year grant is justified and appropriate. Susan Britting - 3/27/2018


Due to the random and widespread nature of impacts from unauthorized off-trail travel, extensive and continual monitoring is required. The Center proposes to monitor these incursions along 220 miles of roads located within four counties. Last year, 110 sites along 12.3 miles of unauthorized trails were identified and restored. Sites ranged from 100 square feet to one acre. The source of CSNC's operating budget includes membership dues, donations and fund raisers. Volunteers will continue to assist in monitoring and perform simple corrective measures to maintain restored sites. Future donations allow for the purchase of materials and tools needed by volunteers. However, it is anticipated that ongoing monitoring will identify additional areas requiring further planning for, or providing, restoration measures beyond volunteer efforts. Therefore, I support restoration funds from the OHV Program be provided to CSNC to continue work to restore areas damaged by those persons ignoring the use of established trails. Pamela Hoover - 3/29/2018


I would like to see this application for grant approved for Clovis Independent 4 Wheelers so I will know my tax payers money is going to be put to actual use to maintain and preserve the appropriate USE OF PUBLIC lands in my county instead of just bureaucracy limbo . Steve Neel - 3/6/2018


I would like to see this application for grant approved for Clovis Independent 4 Wheelers so I will know my tax payers money is going to be put to actual use to maintain and preserve the appropriate USE OF PUBLIC lands in my county instead of just bureaucracy limbo . Steve Neel - 3/6/2018


This organization has worked extremely hard with the local forest manager in maintaining many trails for all users in the Sierra National Forest. This club has been the most active in the area in regards to trail maintenance, and education of proper train use of the local trails. The club's leadership has the ability to call the local forest supervisor and let him know what they have planned, and or work with the forest supervisor on trail enhancements. This is unprecedented in most forests and clubs of this collaboration. I am very supportive of this grant being approved in full. Todd Ockert - 3/9/2018


I have first hand experience working with this club and continue to be impressed with how they maintain the trails with the help of the ohv grants. There continued dedication to providing adequate and environmentally safe areas to enjoy our recreation is humbling. Thank you to Clovis Independent and the ohv grants that facilitate the continued use of these miles of road. Sean Gillespie - 3/16/2018


I’m writing this letter of support of the Clovis Independent 4 Wheelers (CI4W). Their members provide volunteer work for Sierra National Forest (SNF) to improve OHV opportunities for the greater public. The CI4W have been continuously growing in membership and I support their request for grant funding to provide tools, supplies, road and trail directional signs, route markers, safety gear and equipment to support their volunteer efforts up in the Sierra National Forest. The Sierra National Forest need as much help as possible for road and trail maintenance. Much work is needed to insure that legal OHV trails and forest roads are kept open for public OHV use and to reduce potential adverse conditions. The continued reduction of the Forest Service road and trail maintenance budget has caused roads and trails to deteriorate to an unacceptable condition. Lack of proper maintenance has led to drainage structure failure and water quality degradation. Brush encroachment and downed trees on some roads and trails has begun to restrict motorized access and use. Many of these roads and trails provide access to and from Bald Base Camp, a dispersed camping area; including other recreational destination points. This work activity will be focused on roads and trails that provide a variety of motorized uses. Trails provide varied levels of difficulty from easy, to difficult, to more difficult. This project will improve motorized access, water quality, signage, and enhance the overall OHV experience within the SNF. The CI4W have performed several hundred volunteer hours of invaluable time each year toward maintenance activities on roads and trails that have contributed to increased water quality, decreased soil erosion and improved OHV recreational access. They have installed or repaired many trail signs and removed trash from the forest. They have also repaired vandalism and removed graffiti from natural and manmade objects within the forest. With approval of this grant request they are hoping to take their commitment to the next level by providing a long term product of work to support the SNF and the OHV community. Michael McGarity - 3/27/2018


I’m writing this letter of support of the Clovis Independent 4 Wheelers (CI4W). As a current member of the CI4W and lifetime member of the California Association of Four Wheelers, I can attest to the many hours provided doing volunteer work for Sierra National Forest (SNF) to improve OHV opportunities for the greater public. The club has been continuously growing in membership and I support their request for grant funding to provide tools, supplies, road and trail directional signs, route markers, safety gear and equipment to support their volunteer efforts up in the SNF. The continued reduction of the SNF road and trail maintenance budget has caused roads and trails to deteriorate to an unacceptable condition. Lack of proper maintenance has led to drainage structure failure and water quality degradation. Brush encroachment and downed trees on some roads and trails has begun to restrict motorized access and use. Many of these roads and trails provide access to and from Bald Base Camp, a dispersed camping area; including other recreational destination points. This work activity will be focused on roads and trails that provide a variety of motorized uses. Trails provide varied levels of difficulty from easy, to difficult, to more difficult. This project will improve motorized access, water quality, signage, and enhance the overall OHV experience within the SNF. The CI4W have performed several hundred volunteer hours of invaluable time each year toward maintenance activities on roads and trails that have contributed to increased water quality, decreased soil erosion and improved OHV recreational access. They have installed or repaired many trail signs and removed trash from the forest. They have also repaired vandalism and removed graffiti from natural and manmade objects within the forest. With approval of this grant request they are hoping to take their commitment to the next level by providing a long term product of work to support the SNF and the OHV community. Nancy Anderson - 3/27/2018


I’m writing this letter of support of the Clovis Independent 4 Wheelers (CI4W). Their members provide volunteer work for Sierra National Forest (SNF) to improve OHV opportunities for the greater public. The CI4W have been continuously growing in membership and I support their request for grant funding to provide tools, supplies, road and trail directional signs, route markers, safety gear and equipment to support their volunteer efforts up in the Sierra National Forest. The Sierra National Forest need as much help as possible for road and trail maintenance. Much work is needed to insure that legal OHV trails and forest roads are kept open for public OHV use and to reduce potential adverse conditions. The continued reduction of the Forest Service road and trail maintenance budget has caused roads and trails to deteriorate to an unacceptable condition. Lack of proper maintenance has led to drainage structure failure and water quality degradation. Brush encroachment and downed trees on some roads and trails has begun to restrict motorized access and use. Many of these roads and trails provide access to and from Bald Base Camp, a dispersed camping area; including other recreational destination points. This work activity will be focused on roads and trails that provide a variety of motorized uses. Trails provide varied levels of difficulty from easy, to difficult, to more difficult. This project will improve motorized access, water quality, signage, and enhance the overall OHV experience within the SNF. The CI4W have performed several hundred volunteer hours of invaluable time each year toward maintenance activities on roads and trails that have contributed to increased water quality, decreased soil erosion and improved OHV recreational access. They have installed or repaired many trail signs and removed trash from the forest. They have also repaired vandalism and removed graffiti from natural and manmade objects within the forest. With approval of this grant request they are hoping to take their commitment to the next level by providing a long term product of work to support the SNF and the OHV community. Jeff Waughtal - 3/27/2018


This grant is not a good use of state funding. The tortoises are not endangered and their fencing is not effective. They also do not maintain it after installation - they just install some fencing and stick up a few signs and call it good. I do not support this grant. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


Recently helped out with volunteer work in the Desert Tortoise Preserve Western Addition. They badly need new fencing for the property (I saw motorcycle track incursions where the fence was down) as well as invasive plant control. This piece of land can really help offset tortoise habitat removed by solar in that area, but only if it gets restored. I support a grant for this restoration project Thank you. Barb Bane - 3/2Barb Bane/2018


Please approve this grant for providing funding for fencing protection. I recently helped to remove invasive plant species on this habitat and saw how vulnerable this area is to illegal OHV use. There is a lack of signage on the Wildlife Management Area boundaries and legal and authorized nearby areas for OHV use. Any work to rid of unauthorized OHV routes, remove trash and illegal campsites is also very desirable. I volunteered to help remove invasive plants from the expansion area because I love desert tortoises. With all the solar farms popping up all over and rampant OHV use in tortoise habitat, I feel it is very important to provide habitat protection. This grant would greatly help. Please approve of this grant. Thank you for this opportunity to comment. Lynn Inouye - 3/25/2018


Please see attached document. Ed LaRue, Desert Tortoise Council - 4/2/2018


I live and work in Kern County. I regularly enjoy outings to the mountain and desert areas of Kern County. As a taxpayor and voter in Kern County I STRONGLY support the Desert Group Search and Rescue Volunteer, Inc. Education and Safety Grant request #G17-04-09-S01. I urge my State representatives to approve this Grant request to support Kern County Desert Group Search and Rescue Volunteers. Recently in March 2018 I was on the receiving end of the Desert Search and Rescue Group services. I had been OHV riding in the backcounty of Pine Tree Canyon, near Cache Creek when I encountered difficult erroded and rocky terrain on a steep BLM road which caused me to crash - several times. Due to mechanical demage sustained to my vehicle I was unable to drive out of the mountains. I made the difficult decision to park the motorcycle and hike, out of the mountaints, back to my truck. After contacting the local BLM offices, to communicate my predicament, the Desert Search and Rescue Group contacted me and offfered to help recover my motorcycle. Despite the stormy weather in March 2018, the Desert Search and Rescue Team made an early unsuccessful attempt to recover my motorcycle. The dedicated team was able to make another successful recovery of my motorcycle on March 18, 2018. When I met Rick Buckreis to pick up my motorcycle in Boron, CA I received a very professional and courteous explanation of local OHV risks and hazards and appropriate Safety preparations to consider for future trips. The OHV, Communications and Safety equipment elements of the Grant Request will enable the Desert Group Search and Rescue Volunteers to improve their high quality education and safety service supporting members of the public who use the Mojave Desert recreation areas. I am very impressed with the Kern County Desert Group Search and Rescue Volunteers and request your approval to allocate the requested State funding to this worthy organization. Jeff W. Johnson - 3/30/2018


I support this program & Cow Mountain Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


My family supports this program Eric Buchner - 3/17/2018


Please approve this grant and support this organization as their services add to the enjoyment of of the area, as well as providing a safer environment for the flora and fauna and humans. Butch Meyner - 3/18/2018


Please approve this grant and support this organization as the subject project adds to the enjoyment of of the area, as well as providing a safer environment for the flora and fauna and humans. Butch Meyner - 3/18/2018


Cow Valley serves many dirt bike riders every year. The grant money that the state provides to Cow Valley is extremely important for the continued maintenance of the park. The staff does a wonderful job and we all appreciate their dedication. The funding from this grant is well spent. Thank you, Mike Brickner Mountain View, Calif. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


Amazing group of hard working individuals that insure riders have a safe, affordable, and great place to ride, whether a seasoned rider or a beginner. Christian Lepiz - 3/25/2018


Please support this grant. Education helps everyone understand what safety equipment is available and what it can do. Being educated of the discomfort and of the life changing consequences possible without correct gear is a tremendous help for some individuals. I grew up riding in Jawbone and it is a wonderful park. Thank you. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


Hi, is this app ready to download? It says you want to update the older app, but my app store doesn't find the older OwlsheadGPS app. What is the status of the app? Thanks you! Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


This is an interesting grant that I, unfortunately, take issue with. I applaud the sheriffs going out and doing public outreach to young people, I wonder why there are no line item requests for any educational materials. Usually these grants look to print materials to distribute or obtain materials from Tread Lightly or other orgs. I also don't understand the need for 4 wheel drive for outreach purposes. Everyone who stages to use OHV does so in two wheel drive areas. I have staged in Imperial County hundreds of times in two wheel drive and have never been stuck. I still appreciate IC Sheriffs dept, I would just like to see their grant make a little more sense. Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


I support these grant request for L.A.N.D.S as the proposed functions of these grants will improve the visitors knowledge of the areas and the rules associated with the areas . The clean up events allow the visitors to participate in a managed event which showcases responsible actions to remove trash from the recreation areas. These events provide peer pressure for all visitors to promote taking your trash home and not leave it in the recreation areas. These events are historically well attended. Richard Holliday - 3/9/2018


I support this grant request for L.A.N.D.S as the proposed functions of these grants will improve the visitors knowledge of the areas and the rules associated with the areas . The more locations where information is available helps support visitor knowledge. Richard Holliday - 3/9/2018


#1 - Please clarify up front the purpose of the proposed project. #2 - Under "Relation of Proposed Project OHV Recreation", as I understand it the current number of kiosks (29) may be reduced and therefore there needs to be an adjustment to the plan in regards to the number that will be serviced.

#1 - Please clarify up front what the project will do. #2 - Is the quantity listed under Item #6 definite or approximate? In addition, what is the objective of the guide? #3 - Direct Expenses - Contracts and Staff - Isn't the matching amount under contracts actually attributable to staff hours? #4 - Direct Expenses - Contracts - Pleas provide a clear description of the contractor for copy wiring and design of the guide. #5 - Are there any other partners than can help with the re-printing of collateral, such as the BLM? #6 - As per comment #2 above, is the quantity of guides to be printed definite or approximate? Bryan Henry - 4/2/2018


Please clarify up front what the proposed project will do. Bryan Henry - 4/2/2018


There are a couple of sections in the criteria that have XX's or need the information inserted - like the number of people who attended the public meeting. I really hope this project is funded so the current problem areas don't get a whole lot worse. Thank you for submitting it.. Elizabeth Norton - 3/29/2018


I have reviewed the proposal for the grant and believe NYPUM would have a great positive impact on youth in California and fully support them receiving/being awarded the grant. I highly recommend they receive the grant. Joel Painter - 3/13/2018


I am the Director for the NYPUM Program in Fort Collins, CO. I have reviewed this grant and believe that the money would be well spent investing in this venture with multiple NYPUM Program. NYPUM has positively impacted many youth in Larimer County. It is a unique and adaptable mentoring program. And we have found it also positively impacts youth with complex and compound trauma. Please consider starting this program in California! Meghan Jordan - 3/13/2018


As a former 27 years volunteer Certified NYPUM Instructor, I have seen the positive affect it has made in the youths I have worked with through out the years. Edward Contreras - 3/13/2018


Great program and investment opportunity for youth in California. The Forest Service is happy to participate and provide riding venues for this program to further expand opportunities for exposure to nature and the outdoors. Deb Schoenberg - 3/14/2018


Please approve this grant application. This program is a critical tool to steer young people from a destructive lifestyle to healthy outdoor activities. Butch Meyner - 3/18/2018


What a great cause. I grew up riding with my Dad, and this program will allow many other kids to learn and enjoy riding motorcycles. Please fulfill their grant so they can open many more programs. Mike Brickner - 3/19/2018


I would like to comment on the NYPuM grants request regarding the following issue: The project description doesn't explain how the Robert Kennedy Action Corp. will contribute financially to this effort. It is also not clear to me how the 70 motorcycles will be paid for, are they coming from NYPuM or Honda? Nick Haris - 3/20/2018


Please see Attached DocumentMatthew Harper, Assemblyman, 74th District - 3/23/2018


I would like to comment on the National Youth Project using Minibikes, Education and Safety OHV grant application. I looked it over and I think some things need improving and better explanations. My suggestions are: Project Cost Estimate: I didn’t see any reference in the Project Cost Estimate referencing how the Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Action Corps will contribute match to the project. Please comment on this in the relevant line item narratives. Under Equipment Purchase, the cost per unit for each motorcycle seems low. The applicant should reevaluate the cost per unit and increase it if necessary. Evaluation Criteria: Question 4- Applicant should add one more partner entity if possible to total 4 partners for additional points, and explain how they will contribute to the project. Applicant should also explain better how Honda dealers provide no charge services in receipt and assembly of OHM’s, and delete reference to maintenance and repairs because they are paid to do this part. Question 6- I think the applicant forgot to select the first selection about how they held publicly noticed meetings and also explain how the public was notified about these meetings. They also forgot to explain how the identified stakeholders are stakeholders in this project. Question 7- I think the applicant should number the parts of the narrative that support the selections and revise their answers. It looks like they forgot to explain how they plan to implement the project. Question 8- I think the applicant should number the parts of the narrative that support the selections and revise their answers. It looks like they forgot to explain how self guided trails are part of methods of education in the project and also forgot to select “Advertising” and explaining how their website advertises and promotes this project. I think the applicant forgot to explain how “social media” educates the public and recruits participants. Question 9- I think the applicant forgot to consider how the “social media” increases the total number of times individuals are exposed to the educational message. They should also revise their selection to “Greater than 10,000”. Question 10- The narrative does not state whether or not the participants will receive MSF certification at the conclusion of the training. If the training covers all of the components of MSF certified training and above and beyond that, the applicant needs to state so. Thank you for considering my comments. Jon Baker - 4/1/2018


The area within the Eastern Kern County Onyx Ranch SVRA has its own ecologically required reports. This grant would not qualify for studies within the SVRA according to PRC 5090.50 (b) (2) (D) " (iv) Scientific and cultural studies regarding the impact of off-highway motor vehicle recreation not otherwise required by state or federal laws." Bruce Brazil - 3/6/2018


 

I have ridden in our CA deserts my entire life. there is no safer feeling than knowing Rescue is out in force making sure everyone is safe. Please make sure they are funded correctly. Justin Shultz - 3/7/2018


Having R3 in the desert is a life saver. I have seen it many times, they need to have all the safety equipment, please make sure they do. Justin Shultz - 3/7/2018


I consider this group to be very deserving of this grant. They spend countless hours in our local deserts not only helping with vehicle and personnel recoveries, but also saving lives. They go above and beyond what I consider the "call of duty" . Thank you. Scott Hughes - 3/7/2018


Recue 3 has been a volunteer organization assisting recreational desert users for many years. In most cases, their volunteers have been the first responders providing timely medical assistance when & where no other help is available. This is a very responsible volunteer organization. I hope this grant will be awarded. Gene Altobelli - 3/7/2018


As a long time OHV user and having been hauled out of the desert not once but twice by Rescue 3. I encourage the State of California to allocate funds for this grant request. The current leadership is outstanding and I strongly feel that the funds will be used appropriately and put to good use saving lives. As the President of Southern California Motorcycle Club, District 37 American Motorcyclist Association (So CAL MC) I refuse to even consider having an event without Rescue 3 present. Full disclosure, I became a member of Rescue 3 in the last month due in large part to their outstanding efforts in supporting the OHV community and a personal desire to give back to the sport. Thank you for your time. Ran Hooper - 3/7/2018


Very helpful orginazation.Ken Maw - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 continues to provide first responder services for AMA District 37 and other organizations. They save many people from more serious injury by assessing and rendering aid to those in need. FANTASTIC organization that has been around since the 70's. Donn Nay - 3/7/2018


Would like to recommend Rescue 3 for this grant, this agency is very much needed in our racing community. They provide much needed medical assistance in all of our club races every weekend. Thanks Chris Camara Chris Camara - 3/7/2018


Always great to see you. Keep up the hard work. David Tullar - 3/7/2018


To whom it may concern- Any help that can be given to Rescue 3 would do unimaginable good for the general public who recreate in the deserts of California. The medical attention and care that they show for everyone that they come across is outstanding. Daniel Luther - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 provides a great service for OHV users. Please approve this request. Richie Wohlers - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 provides medical support for us in the desert. They are staffed with well trained individuals that volunteer their time to ensure our safety during district events. Without them, medical response time at our events in the desert would increase dramatically and create an undo burden on the local rapid response units. They are there to assist and assess the rider's the condition to determine if he or she requires further medical attention. Without them, we would be limited to the on-site ambulance and in many of those cases local rapid response units would be called in for no more than minor injuries. Chris Ferguson - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 is an amazing organization who devotes an astonishing amount of time to ensuring the off-road community is safe. Highly recommend them for this grant. Mark Fredrickson II - 3/7/2018


As a long time OHV user and having been hauled out of the desert not once but twice by Rescue 3. I encourage the State of California to allocate funds for this grant request. The current leadership is outstanding and I strongly feel that the funds will be used appropriately and put to good use saving lives. As the President of Southern California Motorcycle Club, District 37 American Motorcyclist Association (So CAL MC) I refuse to even consider having an event without Rescue 3 present. Full disclosure, I became a member of Rescue 3 in the last month due in large part to their outstanding efforts in supporting the OHV community and a personal desire to give back to the sport. Thank you for your time. Ran Hooper - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 has provided much needed support (recovery, first aide, communications) to me personally when I was injured during a desert motorcycle race as well as to many of my OHV friends and family. The people of this organization donate their time and skills to provide professional support and rapid response to injured OHV users in my off-road community and I support their program and grant proposal. Kari Erickson - 3/7/2018


this a awesome group, providing services of many facets in the desert from rescue , first aid , and helping people enjoy and use one of California's great landscapes bill - 3/7/2018


this a awesome group, providing services of many facets in the desert from rescue , first aid , and helping people enjoy and use one of California's great landscapes bill - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 is invaluable in the desert. They possess knowledge and skills that enable them to most effectively extract and care for riders who have been injured. There is absolutely no comparison or substitution for what Rescue 3 provides. They know the terrain, they know riding, and they care for the individual riders that attend events. Many within the desert racing community personally know each other and that show when you look at the commitment of Rescue 3 members. The individuals in Rescue 3 are not out there to monetarily gain for themselves, they are out there to provide a much needed service that cannot be provided by anyone else. The specific skillset that these individuals possess cannot be overstated or substituted. I encourage you to fund this grant. By doing so you would be ensuring the continuation of the service that Rescue 3 provides. Dana Hooper - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 is a great organization which assists OHV users. They are always the first to provide help when needed in any type of emergency. Wesley H Anderson Jr - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 provides a crucial service to the off road community. I have had the great fortune to be able to work with this all volunteer organization of a few occasions. Accordingly I have witnessed first hand the life saving action taken by these true first responders. The existence of Rescue 3 promotes responsible, self sustaining, and properly organized off road racing and other events. These unsung heroes work week in and week out often covering multiple events for various organizations. Please make sure that Rescue 3 Inc. is awarded this sorely needed grant assistance. Jeremy Howard Castaic, CA Jeremy Howard - 3/7/2018


I go out to A.M.A. District 37 races with the entire family almost every weekend. It is reassuring for all to know, that RESCUE 3 is out working the race and if anyone is hurt, RESCUE 3 is there to help. These RESCUE 3 people are all volunteers and I know they could use some financial help. I cannot think of a more worthy organization to receive a Grant. Thank you. Greg Seda - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 is invaluable in their efforts to help injured people get the medical care there need. Chris Burroughs - 3/7/2018


I have ridden with R3 several times over the last 10 years. I'm a member of Desert M.C., an AMA District 37 racing club. If for some reason I'm not participating in a race I'll help out the regular volunteers at R3. Usually once or twice a year. In May of 2015 I had a severe crash at Spangler OHV during a Badgers M.C. event. I suffered a concussion, 8 broken ribs, punctured lung, and a broken collar bone. I was transported back to camp by an R3 member in a SXS vehicle to the ambulance. I spent 5 days in Kern Medical Ctr.. I thank God for Rescue 3! They have saved many lives over the years. PLEASE grant them. Thank you! George Madaris - 3/7/2018


Rescue 3 has been providing medical checks and has performed life saving for many participants in SoCal racing activities long before I started racing. No organization is more deserving of a grant than R3. Jeff Nelson - 3/7/2018


This is a great organization that does great work. I highly recommend grant their request as their work helps save lives. Thanks, Matt ShookMatt Shook - 3/8/2018


After watching Rescue 3 respond to several accidents in the desert and one accident in particular where a young rider broke his leg, I can say that the services Rescue 3 provides are an invaluable part of the OHV experience. In the instance with the young rider, Rescue 3 volunteers responded by travelling to the scene of the accident in the middle of the desert. They stabilized the leg by putting it into a splint, they lifted the young man into their vehicle, and transported him back to his anxiously awaiting parents who took him to the hospital. All this was done in a speedy manner. I can attest to their professionalism and believe they deserve every dime they are seeking in this grant. I cannot imagine a more useful and indispensable organization. Matthew Eberhardt - 3/8/2018


I can think of no other group more deserving of this grant. The lives saved and rescued, deep into the desert is countless. This all volunteer group has worn out more personal and org own vehicles over the years. Let alone the medical equipment that is necessary to provide 1st class service, that needs updating. As one who has received their care in the past, they are on my donation list when ever possible. Rick Nuss Richard Nuss - 3/8/2018


Very important service. Joseph Watson - 3/11/2018


Very important service. Joseph Watson - 3/11/2018


Rescue 3 is a great. I always feel safe knowing that they are there at every race just in case I get hurt. They have help me out before. They deserve this grant without a doubt. Samantha Smith - 3/13/2018


Please award this grant these folks are out helping off-roaders and we're a key role in the safety of my son after breaking his collarbone. Great group of volunteers Isaiah Hall - 3/14/2018


This is an amazing organization! I ride off-road motorcycles in the Johnson Valley and Lucerne, CA area, and I see this group out in the desert all the time. It makes me and my friends feel really safe when we ride knowing they are nearby. If I see their stickers on trucks in the parking areas where I ride, I know they are out there and ready to help. Jacqui Masson Joshua Tree, CA Jacqui Masson - 3/14/2018


This is an amazing organization! I ride off-road motorcycles in the Johnson Valley and Lucerne, CA area, and I see this group out in the desert all the time. It makes me and my friends feel really safe when we ride knowing they are nearby. If I see their stickers on trucks in the parking areas where I ride, I know they are out there and ready to help. Jacqui Masson Joshua Tree, CA Jacqui Masson - 3/14/2018


Rescue 3 is a necessity to all ohv areas. I feel safer knowing there around while I ride or camp or just enjoy an adventure. I've been helped before by them and I can't thank them enough. They are a wonderful group of people as well. Thank You Kevin Dearen - 3/15/2018


Rescue 3 Inc provides life saving services that play a vital role to the overall OHV community . Rescue 3 is typically the first responder's to injured riders and or there passengers which plays a vital role to there survival and recovery . Insuring Rescue 3 Inc has the proper equipment and tools as a first responder is critical to there ability to address the various situations that will arise with victims and the logistics while traversing the California deserts . Felipe Barron - 3/15/2018


Rescue 3 has help many lives. Great bunch of people and very good at their job.. Jim Herrera - 3/17/2018


Rescue 3 is a friend to all in the off-road community. A grant to them will help ensure that they can continue with the rescue services that they provide to anyone in need. Rescue 3 is usually the most prominent organization at off-road events. Their volunteer services free-up the resource's of other emergence services. Knowing that they receive a little bit of help from state, makes paying for land use a little less pain-full. I ask that you please make grant their request and help a great organization. Ron Skjerve - 3/21/2018


comment name - 3/21/2018


Fund Rescue 3 for anything they ask for. They do excellent support work. Charlotte Welch - 3/21/2018


Rescue 3 Inc. should get anything they ask for because they do such good work. Charlotte Welch - 3/21/2018


Rescue 3 has been a great source of education for all desert users. The training that is provided helps everyone who uses the desert. As a previous volunteer I was able to use the trainings to increase my capabilities as a first responder. The visibility of the team puts desert users minds at ease knowing this well equipped team is near by. Robert Sandoval - 3/21/2018


Rescue # has been a source of comfort and safety for all desert users. The ability of the team to respond and render aid before conventional sources can arrive is invaluable to users in the desert. Please assist them in providing this service to all how may ever need it. Robert Sandoval - 3/21/2018


This message is in support of Rescue 3 Inc's request for funding under Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program - 2017/2018, Agency 23-7028969, Reference # G17-04-20-S01. Rescue 3 Inc provides a critical service to California's OHV community. As a an OHV participant for over the past few decades I have personally witnessed the vital services they provide to the offroad community. Please provide the requested funding. terry sterrett - 3/25/2018


This message is in support of Rescue 3 Inc's request for funding under Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program - 2017/2018, Agency 23-7028969. Rescue 3 Inc provides a critical service to California's OHV community. As a an OHV participant for over the past few decades I have personally witnessed the vital services they provide to the offroad community. Please provide the requested funding. terry sterrett - 3/25/2018


Rescue 3 plays an imperative role in providing assistance to us crazy desert racers. Without them these events would be much harder to put together. They need to be allowed to continue to operate! Oran Feiner - 3/25/2018


I participate in the races where Rescue 3 is on hand to help hurt riders. My brother had a couple incidents where Rescue 3 came and helped analyze the problem and get him prepped for the trip to the hospital. I was very glad that they were around. Any support they could receive would go to a worthy cause. Ben Gough - 3/25/2018


Great group of individuals, who insure the safety of riders and racers. Always there when you need them! Christian Lepiz - 3/25/2018


Rescue 3 provides an invaluable resource to the OHV community through direct action and training. There is no other resource that has the combination of experience and training to provide EMT and recovery at remote locations. I have had direct experience with Rescue 3 due to an injury that I sustained while competing at an OHV event. I found them to be very professional and competent in diagnosis and treatment. Regards, Larry Kunkel - 3/26/2018


Rescue 3 is a phenomenal organization that is ALWAYS there to help any and everyone in the desert. I have personally received 1st aid from Rescue 3 on more than one occasion after a race related crash. They are well organized and take this duty seriously! Hats off to Rescue 3! Cody dingvell - 3/26/2018


These guys are literally life savers, there would be countless missing family members if these guys and gals weren't passionate about helping others. Rescue 3 is a very much needed volunteer service, nobody wants a visit from these folks out on a trail but when you do need them it would be awesome if they had the resources to job as well as they can. Sean Flannery - 3/26/2018


Rescue 3 did an amazing job of keeping us all safe on the 2017 Rebelle Rally. I support them for this grant and hope they can continue to provide invaluable support to the offroad community. Susan McPartland - 3/26/2018


Rescue 3 did an amazing job of keeping us all safe on the 2017 Rebelle Rally. I support them for this grant and hope they can continue to provide invaluable support to the offroad community. Susan McPartland - 3/26/2018


This organization provides a very much needed service for off road enthusiasts. Many an injured person has greatly benefited from their prompt reactions to a wide variety of bad situations. They fill a much needed void in todays budget depleted environment. I have seen them in action more than once and they display true professionalism. rod kirkbride - 3/26/2018


I see Rescue 3 out supporting the dualsport community at many events and very much appreciate their dedication and professionalism. They are a worthy and helpful organization. Nelson Handy - 3/26/2018


I support Rescue 3’s application requests. Please approve. James vallecorsa - 3/26/2018


I support Rescue 3’s application requests. Please approve. James vallecorsa - 3/26/2018


Rescue 3 provides vital services to the off road community including life saving medical assistance. Please grant the needed funding to insure this group continues this needed service Glenn Hatzenbuhler - 3/26/2018


I want to give my endorsement for Rescue 3. The men and woman who selflessly serve the OHV community are outstanding at what they do. So many lives could have been lost,if not for their dedicated volunteer members . The ability to respond to an injury in the most remote of places and provide emergency first aid, call the appropriate agency for continued and follow up care is a priceless assert when your the one laying on the ground in pain and 30 miles or more from your friends family or an ambulance. I have seen first hand as a desert racer the dedication and professionalism of the Rescue 3 members. Lives would be lost if this group is unable to efficiently and effectively continue the work it does for the off road community . Approving this grant SAVES LIVES!!!!!!! Thank you.... Phil Brillinger - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is a very well respected organization that plays a very important role keeping ohv areas safe during events. Rescue 3 really would benefit from the help of a grant, and I give my full support. John Zuber - 3/27/2018


what a great organization. They really care about what they do. They have saved so many people out in the desert. They know the area well. Their motorcycle and UTV experience really make Fast response time exceptional. We are so proud and special to have these wonderful volunteers in our deserts looking out for us. Please help RESCUE 3 get what hey need so they can continue helping us. I just saw FaceBook posts showing RESCUE 3 going to Cub Scout Troops and even stopping on a busy street to put out a car fire. Thank you Robert Walker - 3/27/2018


I can’t think of a better organization to receive money from this grant, as they are a key player keeping the desert safe during events. John zuber - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is a stand up operation and an ideal safety net for any off roaders. They have saved me and helped me in various situations. Steve Roberts - 3/27/2018


Pls fund this life saving essential service. It is imperative to continue desert racing enthusist and participation.A neccesary component to the sport and cant be without them. Melinda Endress - 3/27/2018


Pls fund Resue 3 they are critically essential to maintain safe race environment. The sport would suffer without them. Melinda Endrrss - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is very important for me ...they pick me up a couple times when I was racing they really take of care us... Sergio mondragon - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 has been a big support to the district 37racer community. They were so helpful this last weekend. My rider's bike broke down on the course, they gave me a map to exactly where he was. And when I got a little lost trying to find him in my side by side, I found the rescue 3 side by side they had me follow them half way to the check where my rider was waiting. Thank you so much for rescue 3 race support. Nicole Blitz - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is a huge reason why desert racing is as safe as it is. It's a group that is filled with amazing volunteers who spend countless hours making sure myself and other desert racers will be taken care of if an emergency arises. An amazing group who enjoy the desert and racing as much as we all do. Jeremy Foster - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is a much needed progam here in the Desert everyweekend. Please grant them . Thank You Max Eddy - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 provides a very invaluable and needed service to the off road community in the Southern California Deserts. Please support this grant. David Dunacheck - 3/27/2018


I cannot think of a more worthy organization to receive a Grant. Rob Barbon - 3/27/2018


rescue 3 has rescued me several time in desert motorcycle crashes during desert racing .on june 13,2010 i was very badly injured broken femur /hip they were there fast and very caring and well trained and professional. I hope that you will assist them to stay active .they also rescued me when I broke a collar bone with professional care and fast response time. I have also witnessed them treating other injured in the desert operating on meager donations buy gasoline and replacing vehicle tires and parts with very little funding. Thanks THOMAS EDMONDS - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 is a great organization and ensures the safety of riders using our deserts. Mat Brown - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 has saved and recovered my husband for a horrible crash in the desert. Took care of him and brought him in the base camp for him to be transported to the hospital. Can not thank them enough for taking care of him and making sure he was stable enough to be transported. Reassurance and comfort was awesome. Much love to all of Rescue 3. Will always support them. Tamala Abrego-Scudella - 3/27/2018


Sirs, I feel it's important to let you know how important and vital Rescue 3 is to the desert racers of District 37 of the American Motorcycle Association. I'm 61 years old and have raced District 37 desert races since the age of 14. I don't remember a desert race without their presence. As you know D37 desert races are on courses and generally a loop from 8 to 40 miles long. So a racer can crash and get hurt 20 miles from the start line and even further from the nearest paved road. Some races will have well over 200 racers out on a 40 mile loop. Desert racing is high speed and dangerous. Thank goodness for Rescue 3. They are highly professional and trained to respond and care for an injured rider and racers crash every race. At each race I donate money to Rescue 3 so they may maintain their equipment or purchase equipment so they can continue with their mission of caring for injured racers. Since they are a non-profit I don't know how they do it. I know if Rescue 3 became unable to provide services at D37 desert races I would not compete for my own safety. I know others feel the same way. There is no doubt in my mind they have saved lives and prevented further injuries to racers who crashed. I hope and pray their is grant money available for Rescue 3, so they may stay well equipped to continue their valuable service men, women and children who race D37 desert races. Sincerely, Jack Trotter - 3/27/2018


I volunteer with Rescue 3 and assist with recoveries, aid, and rescue at many different OHV locations. The assistance I've seen provided has been as simple as helping families get their vehicles unstuck from soft sand or someone that just needed a band-aid for a small cut, all the way up to responding to a group of friends that rolled their UTV down a cliff and needed an ambulance and motorcycle riders that needed medivac by medical airship. All donations and other financial assistance is put directly in to the organization to increase the capacity and effectiveness of the response units through supplying resources such as medical supplies, GPSs, and long range communication equipment. These units are equipped with a wide range of offroad vehicles such as rapid response motocycles, highly customized specialty UTVs, and specialized Jeeps and trucks that provide a highly capable and effective response fleet. Working with Rescue 3 we practice working with state emergency services and other state resources to help provide a safe environment to everyone who enjoys exploring the outdoors in motor vehicles or all the recreation that California's OHV areas offer. Nicolas Froesch - 3/27/2018


Rescue 3 Serves multiple missions. The most well known is assisting in public safety in OHV areas. In extremely remote desert areas Rescue 3 has been the first responder to injuries and incidents of all types. Skilled in search and rescue Rescue 3 excels in finding people quickly and directing emergency services as needed. Without boasting Rescue 3 has literally saved many dozens of lives and rescued thousands more. Rescue 3 works closely with many agencies and organizations to fulfill its mission. BLM, federal law enforcement, ambulance, sheriff and CHP have all worked with and cross trained with Rescue 3. Rescue 3 has other missions including public education in medical related safety and off road safety. Rescue 3's mission has pushed the need for a high level of communication technology, off road travel, off road navigation, and medical training. All of which comes at a remarkable cost. This organization has proven to be indispensable and unmatched in performance and professionalism. Joseph Danega - 3/28/2018


Rescue 3 Serves multiple missions. The most well known is assisting in public safety in OHV areas. In extremely remote desert areas Rescue 3 has been the first responder to injuries and incidents of all types. Skilled in search and rescue Rescue 3 excels in finding people quickly and directing emergency services as needed. Without boasting Rescue 3 has literally saved many dozens of lives and rescued thousands more. Rescue 3 works closely with many agencies and organizations to fulfill its mission. BLM, federal law enforcement, ambulance, sheriff and CHP have all worked with and cross trained with Rescue 3. Rescue 3 has other missions including public education in medical related safety and off road safety. Rescue 3's mission has pushed the need for a high level of communication technology, off road travel, off road navigation, and medical training. All of which comes at a remarkable cost. This organization has proven to be indispensable and unmatched in performance and professionalism. Joseph Danega - 3/28/2018


Rescue 3 is a top notch organization that provides an invaluable service to me and my fellow racers. I have no doubt in my mind that they have saved lives by their quick response to many tragic accidents in the desert. This group deserves every penny available. Justin Gruenberg - 3/28/2018


Please issue grant funding to Rescue 3. Rescue 3 is an imperative element of the network necessary for the health and safety of the general public. An all volunteer organization made up of caring and giving individuals who deserve our maximum support. Thank you Daniel Seagondollar - 3/28/2018


I have found Rescue 3 to be a valuable resource for off road enthusiasts. Not only do they provide first responder support but they are instrumental in the overall safety and stewardship of off road events Ron Byrum - 3/28/2018


Great program for off road riders in the desert. Rescue 3 is greatly appreciated. Kelley Horvath - 3/28/2018


The Rescue 3 organization is an extremely valuable group of volunteers that help get injured riders off of the race course and get them to medical attention ASAP. The grant they are requesting will be used to keep their medical command center stocked and communication systems up to date. The OHV community relies on Rescue 3 to be there for us during organized events, so the OHV grants program is the perfect way to give these wonderful volunteers the right tools to help our OHV Family. Chris Austin - 3/28/2018


Rescue 3 is an outstanding organization that provides a very valuable service to those of us who participate in OHV activities. They are extremely dedicated to rendering aid to injured riders and their presence at off-road races is critical. I strongly support this organization and urge you to fully fund their grant request. It is truly an investment in a worthy organization. Thank you. Matt Schlotterbeck - 3/28/2018


Rescue 3 is an all volunteer group that assists desert racers in time of medical need. They also assist non racers that are present at racing events with medical care if needed. As a racer myself it is always a great sight to see Rescue 3 on site at a racing event, we are very fortunate to have this support system in place for our [ AMA District 37 ] races, we have nothing but the utmost respect for them, and i cannot ever remember anyone having anything bad to say about them. This group will also train volunteers to become members, and do so without charge. With all of the good that they promote, I cannot think of a more deserving organization to receive grant money to continue providing emergency medical services to the racing community. Arnold Comproni - 3/28/2018


Please consider these fine folks this year. They provide a service for thousands of people annually on a extremely limited budget for what they provide. I've personally witnessed them in action and was amazed at their professionalism and organization. They basically are out saving lives as volunteers ! Thank you, Ron Hughes - 3/28/2018


Rescue 3 provides a very critical service. Patrick Ellis - 3/29/2018


Rescue 3 is a huge support system to off road racers safety. max brunson - 3/29/2018


crash in the desert, without their help I don't know what I would have done. What a great resource for the public. Thank you. Brett Pickett M10 D-37 so brett pickett - 3/29/2018


As a desert rider and racer in AMA District 37 it is a huge comfort knowing that if anything were to happen while racing I have a GREAT team that is going to help out in case of a medical emergency. I've seen you folks in action and are very greatful for your support. Thanks for all that you folks do at RESCUE 3!!! Justin Hansen - 3/30/2018


Rescue 3 is a great organization of volunteers that spend countless hours in the desert helping distressed people out of the desert and mountains. They not only work hard to find the best way to help get an injured person to help, or help to that person, but they also work hard to improve their medical knowledge so that they can offer as much help as possible as a first responder. Please help keep Rescue 3 out in the desert protecting all of us that enjoy roaming around the desert. Thanks, Paul Krause - 3/30/2018


As a desert rider and racer in AMA District 37 it is a huge comfort knowing that if anything were to happen while racing I have a GREAT team that is going to help out in case of a medical emergency. I've seen you folks in action and are very greatful for your support. Thanks for all that you folks do at RESCUE 3!!! Justin Hansen - 3/30/2018


I want to say that Rescue 3 is a great organization that bring an immense value to the entire High Desert community. The off road community is not the only benefactor of their work, I would argue the whole area benefits by creating a safer environment for off road users thereby reducing costs incurred by the local health and safety services in the area. Compared to other off road areas where "you are on your own" more costly municipal services bear the entire brunt of Search and Rescue and Health Care services. This is a great benefit and keeps the off road community coming to your area, benefitting the entire community. Thank you, I hope you are able to provide Grant funding to Rescue 3, they are worth it! Steve Bullock - 3/30/2018


I would like to give the highest praise for the great support this agency gives to the community. These folks give their best effort to assist folks that are enjoying all the recreational activities that we are blessed with. Thanks so very much! SC Scott Carroll - 3/30/2018


I have had the opportunity to work with the fine men and women of Rescue 3 as a volunteer EMT. The services that Rescue 3 provide the OHV community and the EMS community is nothing short of top notch. This grant, if approved, will allow Rescue 3 to equip volunteers with the tools required to provide rapid, effective care and transport of injured persons to the proper medical authority, I mention the services that Rescue 3 brings to the EMS community because this is unique. As an EMT, Rescue 3 provides me with an opportunity to serve my community, refine my skills, learn new techniques and train with new tech I would not normally be exposed to. This all while working with a very experienced and professional team that takes great pride their work, as well as the Rescue 3 name. On a final note. I will wear my Rescue 3 sweatshirts and t-shirts to work on occasion. Out of nowhere, I have been stopped and received high praise for the work that Rescue 3 does. This is an amazing testament to the volunteers of Rescue 3 and the valuable services they provide. Thank you for your time and consideration. David Thomas Turner - 3/30/2018


This is really a modest request for the important job these guys do. I hope this grant can get funded and I hope I never need their help when I'm exploring out there. I would like to shake your hand and thank you though. Ed Stovin - 3/30/2018


Last year I raced my first race in 25 years. This race kicked my butt so bad I believe I was almost the last one to finish. Rescue 3 stayed out there to make sure I was safe and made it back to camp. These men and women dedicate themselves and do what it takes to support us rider's. I am truly grateful for rescue 3. Randy Slayman - 3/31/2018


Rescue 3 is a much needed organization at OHV events. Many people have been helped by these brave volunteers. I would like to see Rescue 3 expanded to have them stationed in all OHV areas on weekends to help the injured and stranded. I would much rather see my tax dollars going to this much needed organisation than to Jerry's ridiculous bullet train. David B Martin - 3/31/2018


This has to be one of the greatest organizations in the desert. They bring their equipment and people out for every off-road event and are constantly bringing people back in who are hurt or lost during events. My 8 year old son got off course and lost during an event in Barstow and Rescue 3 was on the job and recovered him in under 30 minutes. They even went back out and recovered his dirt bike. It was the longest 30 minutes of my life but we got him back safe and sound all thanks to Rescue 3. Please do whatever can be done to help fund this all volunteer organization. Lester Mascon - 4/1/2018


This is a fine group that serves ALL of the OHV public no matter what their affiliation or membership and does so with NO DISCRIMINATION NOR EXCLUSION whatsoever. I fully support this funding to RESCUE 3 in its entirety. SPREAD THE WEALTH to those who do the GREATEST GOOD for the PUBLIC AT LARGE !!!! Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


The Sonora California based Mud Sweat & Gears 4-wheel drive club voted to submit comments of support for this grant application. Mud Sweat & Gears, affiliated with the California 4-Wheel Association, promotes the safe and responsible use of public lands for off-road recreation. We strongly support the long-term efforts of the Rubicon Trail Foundation to maintain and keep open the iconic Rubicon Trail for future generations. The Foundation has been a strong partner with the Forest Service and local government to sustain the responsible use of this recreational opportunity, improve and maintain the trail and educate the public about responsible use of off road trails. Terry Easley - 3/30/2018


This is a very worthwhile grant. Helping get out an excellent, high quality avalanche report and especially the teaching of courses to motorized users, who have often been under trained in avalanche safety is crucial to keeping everyone safe in the backcountry. I urge you to fund this grant! Jonathan Lainejonathan laine - 3/6/2018


Had an opportunity to join the class at SLT this year. Outstanding experience. I fully support this Grant application. Stu Wik - 3/7/2018


The Sierra Avalanche Center is among the most deserving for Grant funds of any of the applicants. They provide potentially life saving services in the way of educational opportunities and forecasts of conditions in the forecast area. There have been many documented close calls, many of the parties involved cite the Sierra Avalanche Center's forecasts as potentially saving their lifes. The Sierra Avalanche Center is one of the most highly respected programs in the Lake Tahoe Region. This Sierra Avalanche Center deserves maximun support through this program. The Grant Program has provided a high level of support in the past and I ask you to continue this support as requested in the application. Bob Moore - 3/8/2018


This is an incredibly worthy and important project. For many years, snowmobilers have been more likely to die in avalanches than any other user group. As a backcountry skier in northern California, I often see snowmobilers engaging in unsafe travel in avalanche terrain that not only puts their group at risk, but also other parties traveling in the potential avalanche runout zone. This program could literally save lives. Mark Bunge - 3/8/2018


As a back country user and a physician who sees the terrible trauma avalanches can cause, I am very enthusiastic about this project. There hasn't been enough focus on snowmobilers in the back country community and this grant helps to address that. I fully support it and hope it gets funded! David Fiore - 3/12/2018


-Recreation opportunities for locals and tourists. -Educational opportunities for local recreation programs. -Creates local employment. -Economic viability for our community through tourism. -Sustainable trails mean more fun with less work and maintenance. -Protect environmental resources through sustainable development. Saylor Flett - 3/15/2018


-Recreation opportunities for locals and tourists. -Educational opportunities for local recreation programs. -Creates local employment. -Economic viability for our community through tourism. -Sustainable trails mean more fun with less work and maintenance. -Protect environmental resources through sustainable development. Saylor Flett - 3/15/2018


This project will keep trails open and safe while protecting the watershed. It also creates local employment. elizabeth sorrentino - 3/15/2018


Recreation opportunities for locals and tourists Becca - 3/15/2018


Our family has been staying at Salmon Lake Lodge for more than 20 years and during that time we have been a first hand witness to the great work that Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is doing in the area. We use our week each year to hike on the dozens of trails that cover the region, and more recently have added mountain biking in the area to the mix. I am a lifelong backpacker cyclist and mountain biker that grew up hiking month long sections of the Pacific Crest Trail in Washington State. As an organization that works cooperatively with hiking and mountain biking communities (unlike other regions in the country where this relationship is highly contentious), and state and government agencies, Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is a model for engagement on maintenance, new trail development and responsible environmental/economic development advocacy for the region. I highly recommend that you approve the applications submitted by the organization. Malcolm Hobbs - 3/15/2018


My name is Stephen Pappas and I am asking you to award the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) grants which will provide them the funding to maintain their existing trail systems. These trails are used by thousands of mountain bikers and recreationalists annually, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars into the local and regional economies. Without trail maintenance such as removing obstructions and smoothing out the trails, there will be a significant increase in accidents and injuries resulting in emergency personnel having to respond in remote areas and possibly death. Secondly, if the trails are in poor condition, and word of injuries became widespread via the internet and personal communication, this could lead to a sharp decline in user numbers which in turn would negatively affect the local and regional economies. Being an avid mountain biker living in Northern California, I ride these trails often, donate to the SBTS, and help volunteer when possible, but it is mostly the grants from the State, Federal, and Local agencies that allow the SBTS to expand, maintain, and provide stewardship for these amazing trails which are recognized as some of the best trails in the country. Thank you for your consideration for these grants. Stephen Pappas - 3/16/2018


I fully support building single track for public use because it brings the community together, encourages physical activity in the outdoors, and keeps trails open and safe while protecting watersheds Leslie Pace - 3/16/2018


My name is Stephen Pappas and I am asking you to award the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) grants which will provide them the funding to maintain their existing trail systems. These trails are used by thousands of mountain bikers and recreationalists annually, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars into the local and regional economies. Without trail maintenance such as removing obstructions and smoothing out the trails, there will be a significant increase in accidents and injuries resulting in emergency personnel having to respond in remote areas and possibly death. Secondly, if the trails are in poor condition, and word of injuries became widespread via the internet and personal communication, this could lead to a sharp decline in user numbers which in turn would negatively affect the local and regional economies. Being an avid mountain biker living in Northern California, I ride these trails often, donate to the SBTS, and help volunteer when possible, but it is mostly the grants from the State, Federal, and Local agencies that allow the SBTS to expand, maintain, and provide stewardship for these amazing trails which are recognized as some of the best trails in the country. Thank you for your consideration for these grants. Stephen Pappas - 3/16/2018


As a partner organization with SBTS, I am enthusiastically providing support for ground operations grants to continue the excellent work they do throughout the Feather River region to provide stewardship and recreational opportunities. Aubrey Pickerell - 3/16/2018


I cannot think of a more deserving organization than the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to receive Ground Operations grants. They do an amazing job at maintaining and improving the trail network at both Downieville and Mt. Hough which is a significant undertaking requiring matching levels of resources. I hope that you seriously consider the S.B.T.S. as a worthy recipient of the Ground Operations grants they've applied for. Patrick A. Pickerell - 3/16/2018


Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has continued to do a great job of keeping multi user trails open and safe as well as restoring overgrown trails. Having gown up in Greenville in the 80's I have seen the reduction in public access to many lands. With the work SBTS does, it give great access to areas of interest for recreation and historical value. Many of the mtn communities now rely on continued recreation growth and users coming to their areas as their means of income. Downieville for instance has a gas station, market and several eateries largely due to trails users visiting the areas. Please continue to put grant money where it goes to good use and the public can enjoy the result of their hard work! Tom Embree - 3/16/2018


The Downieville Trail System is one of the BEST in California. We ride mountain bikes, and ohv-dirtbikes there several times a year. Because of its high usage & location, it requires yearly maintenance. The SBTS does great work. Please help us continue. Mike Chaplin - 3/16/2018


Sierra Buttes Trail stewardship has been instrumental in bringing recreation, tourism and a revitalized sense of community to our quiet rural town. We get visitors that would never visit Quincy or Plumas county without these trails. I see locals using the trails daily, and every type of user enjoys having this access. Our forest and county are underfunded and SBTS fills a needed and welcomed asset to our region. I support these projects. Michael Hall - 3/16/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Morgan Morgan Fletcher - 3/15/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Morgan Morgan Fletcher - 3/16/2018


I am a large supper of local efforts by SBTS in providing ecological appropriate restoration and maintenance of public access to these lands. I have seen work done in both a collaborative and effective land management methodology. Mike Buncic - 3/16/2018


I support and use this area for all types of recreation. I am a member of Nevada County Woods Riders and volunteer many hours of my timehelping with these projects. ROD GLAZEBROOK - 3/16/2018


I support this project and use this are for all types of recreation. I am a member of Nevada County Woods Riders and have and will continue to volunteer for work on these projects. ROD GLAZEBROOK - 3/16/2018


Downieville is a world-class destination. Please help them continue. Richard Jacinto - 3/16/2018


I visit Downieville for riding every year. This grant will continue maintaining an building great trails for all. Richard Jacinto - 3/16/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations (trailwork). Anona - 3/17/2018


I have been taking my family to Downieville for the past 15 years. We go there to explore the trails in the Downieville area. This is a wonderful recreation area that is near Sacramento that should continue to be accessible by the public for years to come. The trails need to be maintained to overcome the harsh Winter storms. Thank you martin cleary - 3/17/2018


I support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations Melissa Mache - 3/15/2018


I ride my street-legal dirt motorcycle in the Downieville area about once per year. I usually stay in Downieville lodging and help support the local businesses. I also make a trip with my kids that are minors and do not have a motorcycle rider's license yet. I support the development of motorized singletrack trails, particularly if they can help with accessibility from the downtown Downieville area to the trails. John Roberts - 3/17/2018


What a great project. It provides both an economic impact, jobs and improvements for ongoing (and future) recreation, helping out the community. Definitely a "winner" Karen Siroky - 3/16/2018


Please do consider granting the SBTS the money needed to continue the work being done around Downieville and Sierra City! We actively use these trails for hiking and biking and are confident that the trails will be in good shape when we use them. We also are volunteers for the SBTS work days and look forward every year to the events that allow us to contribute towards the upkeep of the great trail system in the Lost SIerra! G George Astin - 3/16/2018


SBTS is what makes the trails in Downieville and the Lakes Basin great. They deserve funding so all trail users can enjoy their work for years to come. Zach Petersen - 3/16/2018


SBTS is what makes the trails in Downieville and the Lakes Basin great. They deserve funding so all trail users can enjoy their work for years to come. Zach Petersen - 3/16/2018


Please allow this important work to be done Chuck Wong - 3/19/2018


These are great trails that require year round maintenance. Please allow this work to continue! Jesse Hull - 3/19/2018


These are great trails that require year round maintenance. Please allow this work to continue! Jesse Hull - 3/19/2018


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's vision and work in the Lost Sierra. For the past 9 years I have regularly visited the area 2-3x a year to assist with and enjoy the fruits of their labor. The trails bring me and my family back to swim, bike, camp, dine, buy gear, etc. Without maintenance and upkeep, these trails would wither and I would look elsewhere to spend my precious time and money. BRIAN KELLY - 3/20/2018


I support the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship's vision and work in the Lost Sierra. For the past 9 years I have regularly visited the area 2-3x a year to assist with and enjoy the fruits of their labor. The trails bring me and my family back to swim, bike, camp, dine, buy gear, etc. Without maintenance and upkeep, these trails would wither and I would look elsewhere to spend my precious time and money. BRIAN KELLY - 3/20/2018


I fully support the application of the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for Ground Operations. The trails they build and maintain are extraordinary and enjoyed by many bikers, hikers and equestrian users. Thank You rick parkin - 3/20/2018


I have been mountain biking in the Downieville area for more than 5 years. In that time, Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has markedly improved the trail systems. The rides are more fun and the trails better maintained. This has increased trail usage and increased recreational tourism to the area. I believe this is a very positive effect on the area and community and support this grant. Mike Eglington - 3/20/2018


Please consider providing the grant for continual ground operations for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in the Downieville region. I live in Paradise and travel out to the Downiville and surrounding area at least 1-2x a month during MTB season. The team is amazing, and the work they provide is extremely necessary to provide maintenance for the trail system. While providing recreational opportunity for everyone, they are also sustaining the trail system by properly building and maintaing all trails. Thanks! Torey Feldhaus - 3/21/2018


I am a Plumas County resident and small business owner, I am a constant user of the forest in Plumas and Sierra counties for mountain biking, moto riding, backcountry skiing and hiking. I support the mission of the SBTS to improve the condition and sustainability of the Downieville trail system, these trails are a world class resource for two wheeled recreation and they bring a large amount of visitors to our area each year. The SBTS has proven to be a top notch organization with the vision to improve our trails and our local economies. Thank you Cameron Falconer Owner, Falconer Cycles Quincy, CA Cameron Falconer - 3/21/2018


The magnificent trail work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is what attracted my partner and I to move to this area. They are bringing a much needed economic revenue to to Plumas and Sierra County. And more importantly, providing amazing recreational opportunities for residents and future generations. I regularly use many different trails maintained by SBTS and look forward to the new trails they are working on. Eric Caubo - 3/21/2018


The magnificent trail work Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship does is what attracted my partner and I to move to this area. They are bringing a much needed economic revenue to to Plumas and Sierra County. And more importantly, providing amazing recreational opportunities for residents and future generations. I regularly use many different trails maintained by SBTS and look forward to the new trails they are working on. Eric Caubo - 3/21/2018


I would love for some of my favorite trails to be maintained. I am up there at least 10 to 15 times a year. Wilman Dea - 3/21/2018


As a mountain biker and motorcycle rider who uses the trails in this area, I support this grant and the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. kevin sevier - 3/22/2018


The Downieville trail system is very important to my family for summer recreation. Thank you for supporting their mission. Daniel Kuhns - 3/22/2018


The BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org has reviewed Ground Operation Grant # G17-04-68-G01 and stands in strong support of the proposal from the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. BRC believes the SBTS organization is an excellent case study in how partner trail maintenance organizations can be a critical element – and force multiplier - in helping maintain OHV recreation on federal lands in concert with the Forest Service and/or other land agencies. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/22/2018


As a frequent user of the area surrounding Downieville, your reference# G17-04-68-G01, it's become clear how forest land (and nearby towns) can benefit from responsible stewardship and multi-use trail systems. Local economic benefit aside, opening forest and federal lands to multiple user groups conserves lands: Public access leads to fundraising which leads to trail maintenance. garen becker - 3/22/2018


I have reviewed Ground Operation Grant # G17-04-68-G01 and stand in strong support of the proposal from the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. The SBTS organization is an excellent case study in how partner trail maintenance organizations can be a critical element – and force multiplier - in helping maintain OHV recreation on federal lands in concert with the Forest Service. As a hiker, skier, mountain biker & OHV’er, I find the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to be at the pinnacle of promoting shared land use among many user groups. Martin Scheel Martin Scheel - 3/22/2018


As a frequent user of the area surrounding Downieville, your reference# G17-04-68-G01, it's clear how forest land (and nearby towns) can benefit from responsible stewardship and multi-use trail systems. Local economic benefit aside, opening federal forest lands to multiple user groups conserves: public access leads to fundraising which leads to sustaining forest land through trail maintenance Syd Newsom - 3/22/2018


The work done by Sierra Buttes Trail stewardship is very important and should continue. Please fully fund this grant to help keep our recreational trails open and accessible, it is what makes California such a special place to be! Joseph Carlson - 3/22/2018


This group does an amazing job with a combination of donations, public funds and assistance from companies. The group does amazing trail maintenance and does no harm to the enviroment. The group asks for little in the way of public funds for the amount of work they do to better the community, the area where we can recreate and brings in tourism to an area in need of economic assistance. Great job, this proposal should be funded! Matt Boyd - 3/23/2018


This group does an amazing job with a combination of donations, public funds and assistance from companies. The group does amazing trail maintenance and does no harm to the enviroment. The group asks for little in the way of public funds for the amount of work they do to better the community, the area where we can recreate and brings in tourism to an area in need of economic assistance. Great job, this proposal should be funded! Matt Boyd - 3/23/2018


I just wanted to voice my support for the grant for the ground operations project in the Downieville trail system. The trails get hammered each winter and need a lot of work to keep them safe, sustainable, and fun to ride/hike, etc. Please award the ground operations grant to SBTS. James Alcorn - 3/23/2018


Please seriously consider STBS for this grant. They have been instrumental in the economic and recreational opportunities in this area. Christopher K Costello - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Jonathan Lamb - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Jonathan Lamb - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Joel Wilson - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Joel Wilson - 3/23/2018


As someone who grew up in Camptonville, and is still a frequent user of the area surrounding Downieville, your reference# G17-04-68-G01, it's clear how forest land (and nearby towns) can benefit from responsible stewardship and multi-use trail systems. It's these multi-use trail systems that bring me back to the area each year. Local economic benefit aside, opening federal forest lands to multiple user groups conserves: public access leads to fundraising which leads to sustaining forest land through trail maintenance. Alli McLain - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work. Thank you. Lindsay - 3/23/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work. Thank you. Lindsay - 3/23/2018


Love SBTS, great work done by a great group of folks! Doing a great job of building and maintaining multi use trail networks. Brings and promotes multiple forms of responsible recreation to the area. Cody Leuck - 3/23/2018


Love SBTS, great work done by a great group of folks! Doing a great job of building and maintaining multi use trail networks. Brings and promotes multiple forms of responsible recreation to the area. Cody Leuck - 3/23/2018


I'm grateful for the quality and efficiency of work SBTS provides to enhance trails in the Downieville and Plumas County areas. Eric Richter - 3/23/2018


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides a tremendously positive impact on the Norther California outdoor community. Funding the Stewardship funds high quality family activity and healthy community living. Thanks for your consideration. Regards, Isaac Monical - 3/23/2018


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship provides a tremendously positive impact on the Norther California outdoor community. Funding the Stewardship funds high quality family activity and healthy community living. Thanks for your consideration. Regards, Isaac Monical - 3/22/2018


The vitality of this organization is crucial to our communities. It has brought tourism to a new level. The commitment of its members, officers, volunteers, etc. is exceptional. We need this organization to continue it's work and continue to help our areas thrive. Beyond the financial aspect the focus on good clean living for everyone's health is equally vital. I encourage you to strongly support this effort! Respectfully, Rachelle Ramelli, VP Branch Manager of Plumas Bank Rachelle Ramelli - 3/23/2018


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is an extremely hard working, creative organization, seeking to apply innovative trail maintenance and design. Their deep roots in the area is exhibited when in their consideration for the long term environmental and economic health of the area when developing trail plans. Their passion and enthusiasm is infectious, which engages the volunteer power to maximize their efforts.s Ben Clemens - 3/23/2018


I fully support continued funding to the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for maintaining the Downieville trail network. Providing recreation opportunities in Sierra County is vitally important to economic future of Downieville and the Lost Sierra region. Many of these trails need clearing in the springtime after destructive winter storms, and some trails have fallen logs big enough to prevent passage. Thanks in part to the California OHV fund, SBTS has been able to maintain hundreds of miles of historic trail throughout the region, attracting recreationists from around the country to explore and enjoy the magic of the Lost Sierra. Granting funds for maintenance will ensure this trail magic will continue. Thank you! Kurt Gensheimer - 3/23/2018


The Downieville recreational area trail network has provided a place for my friends and I to grow our relationships with each other along with other fellow trail enthusiast. Since the mid 1990's I have made it a point to make several trips per year to enjoy this wonderful network of multi access trails. While on these trips I utilize the various camping locations surrounding the trail networks. My friends and I always make it a point to clean up after ourselves and leave the areas as they were (if not better than when we arrived). The ability to access these locations and the ability to maintain theses trail networks is a true privilege. With continued support theses trail networks can continue to evolve into a suitable environment for outdoor enthusiast to stretch their legs and explore. Along with the continued support the maintenance of these trails will lead to a safer environment for the earth and for its users. I solidly support the continued support and growth of all open access motorcycle and bicycle friendly lands. Jeff mize - 3/23/2018


I love Downieville. I would love to continue to fund their trail work to maintain such a special and wonderful place. Thanks for listening! Alex Loddengaard - 3/23/2018


I wanted to complement the work of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. I'm the President and CEO of Plumas Bank/Plumas Bancorp and I use the Quincy trails the Stewardship worked on several times a week (my way to get some good exercise while also relieving stress). While I value the solitude of running or mountain biking on these wonderful trails through the woods, I do come across other runners and mountain bikers also enjoying the trails. In addition I see hikers and equestrian trail riders using the trails and its a testament to the Stewardship's trail construction that there are no conflicts between all of these different groups on the trails. The trails afford good visibility so that no one is startled by a different trail user and folks yield appropriately. The trails have helped our local economy as mountain bikers from all over Northern California and Northern Nevada come to Quincy to use the Mount Hough downhill trails. Please keep the grants coming for the Stewardship's good work in our region known as the Lost Sierra! Andrew Ryback - 3/23/2018


I wanted to complement the work of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. I'm the President and CEO of Plumas Bank/Plumas Bancorp and I use the Quincy trails the Stewardship worked on several times a week (my way to get some good exercise while also relieving stress). While I value the solitude of running or mountain biking on these wonderful trails through the woods, I do come across other runners and mountain bikers also enjoying the trails. In addition I see hikers and equestrian trail riders using the trails and its a testament to the Stewardship's trail construction that there are no conflicts between all of these different groups on the trails. The trails afford good visibility so that no one is startled by a different trail user and folks yield appropriately. The trails have helped our local economy as mountain bikers from all over Northern California and Northern Nevada come to Quincy to use the Mount Hough downhill trails. Please keep the grants coming for the Stewardship's good work in our region known as the Lost Sierra! Andrew Ryback - 3/23/2018


Thank you for all you do. The trail program has allowed so many people to enjoy the back country of California. I have seen assess to these trail help kids and adults alike get confidence in their riding skills. As I travel all over to ride people from all parts of the world know about this trail system that has been created. Its becoming an international destination. When friends come to visit from out of state I'm proud to bring them the see the trail system and its nice to get them out of the crowded cites to see what California has to offer. ROBERT HOWELLS - 3/23/2018


We fully support the annual maintenance activities to DTS as proposed and managed by the SBTS. My family enjoys the use of the DTS and we participate in maintenance when we can, but like many families we do primarily rely on the extraordinary efforts of the SBTS. Thank you. The Simone Family Don Simone - 3/23/2018


Please provide for general maintenance of the entire Downieville OHV trail system. Jenine Beecher - 3/23/2018


I strongly support the SBTS grant proposal because it promotes the growth of Downieville and the surrounding communities and will improve the local economy by maintaining access to the amazing resources in Sierra County. It will also create new recreational opportunities for many outdoor enthusiasts by creating and maintaining world class multi-use trails. Mason Werner - 3/23/2018


As a homeowner in Downieville, and frequent use of the area's trails and forest, your reference# G17-04-68-G01, I'm a believer that healthy forests and access to them can benefit from responsible stewardship and multi-use trail systems. Its also great for tourism and local economic benefits. Opening federal forest lands to multiple user groups leads to fundraising which leads to sustaining forest land through trail maintenance. I fully support this measure, and thank you for your consideration. Joe Graney - 3/25/2018


I fully support the Sierra Buttes trail Stewardship receiving this grant. They do so much for the local community by maintaining the trails. They are skilled, do a great job, and provide jobs to locals. By maintaining trails, it gets people active and outdoors, enjoying the beauty that this area has to offer. Elisabeth Johnson - 3/26/2018


The well known Downieville trail system gets heavy use from riders far and wide, requiring consistent maintenance and upgrades, not to mention the natural seasonal impact. From snow/rain runoff management to brake bump mitigation, and seasonal debris and tree removal, the trails call for attention. The constant stoke of riders and trail enthusiasts keeps the lost sierra blood flowing, and with the quick passage of information these days, there is no better way to keep and improve a reputation than keeping well maintained trail systems. The energy is there, and with the funds to back it, great things will continue to happen in this magical place. Murphy Gardner - 3/27/2018


In recent years I have had the pleasure of visiting Downieville on multiple occasions to enjoy the local mountain bike trails. While we were there we also had an opportunity to stop in to some of the local shops, grab a bite to eat and enjoy the town in general. I was no stranger to Downieville, as I played high school sports against Downieville, and had been there on numerous occasions. I was quite surprised to see how bustling such a small town seemed to be. It never really seamed so alive when I visited as a teen, but it has become really quite lively! We had numerous options for food, which isn't always a given in a small rural town, and all of them seemed to have a decent number of customers. I had the pleasure of talking with the owner of one of the restaurants, and although she was not involved in mountain biking herself at all, she readily claimed that mountain biking "saved the town". She went on to explain to us that there really wasn't much for industry in such a secluded rural town, but that with the recent influx of mountain bikers coming from miles away (I had the pleasure of sharing a shuttle with a group of people from Sweden), it had really brought the town back to life! The whole thing was really a wonderful experience and is now a regular thing we do. I feel they've done a great job making something very positive happen in a town that I remembered as being kind of "dead". I look forward to future expansion of the trail system in that area and can't wait to get back up there to ride! Tony McCutcheon - 3/27/2018


The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is a significant partner with public lands management agencies in helping citizens enjoy their public lands in Sierra County. They are an important part of the Sierra County economy, supporting tourism, employment, and support of many community activities. In my role as Sierra County Supervisor for District One, I strongly support this application to keep the trail system in western Sierra County on Tahoe National Forest system lands the envy of the region. Lee Adams - 3/27/2018


It is amazing the work that the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship (SBTS) is doing to develop, build and maintain the amazing trails in this beautiful area. I donate at least $500 per year to this organization to help them accomplish their mission; as an avid outdoorsman and recreational user (mountain biking), I truly appreciate the effort SBTS goes through in order to do their work responsibly and professionally. Please allow them to continue to do their amazing work: creating a world-class trail system while honoring the environment and adhering to established trail-building guidelines. Patrick Leal - 3/28/2018


SBTS is doing incredible work to create opportunities for people like me to explore and enjoy the Downieville region. I appreciate their community focus and responsible approach to trail work Nate Boom - 3/28/2018


I have been to the Downievillie region a couple times because of SBTS's work on the trails in this region and am really impressed with the scale and quality of trail work they do. I want to support them in continued trail maintenance for the Downieville region! Nate Boom - 3/28/2018


I travel to Downieville from Santa Cruz, CA to ride my bike throughout the year. For those that haven't been, Downieville is a very small old gold-mining town that benefits economically from having mountain bikers visit. There is one burrito place, a small market, one hardware store, etc. Though a tiny population surrounds this little haven, there is a local one - year round residents, a school, medical care, etc. Local economic benefit aside, opening federal forest lands to multiple user groups conserves public access, which leads to fundraising to help sustain forest lands. More bodies to preserve the vast outdoors that makes up this serene chunk of California is extremely beneficial. Takes a village. reference# G17-04-68-G01 LISETTE COOPER - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Eduardo Eduardo F. Llach - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. Eduardo Eduardo F. Llach - 3/28/2018


The sierra buttes trail stwewardship has done an amazing job developing a positive trail system for the region and all users. Matt Atwood - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. William Watt - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. William Watt - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. John Parker - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. John Parker - 3/28/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. I support this work by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Thank you. John Parker - 3/28/2018


The SBTS looks forward to a continued partnership with the US Forrest Service. Outdoor recreation is an amazing driver of jobs and revenue. Grants like this ensure the trails remain world class and give future generations a sustainable model for enjoying the mountains we all love so much. Jesse Passafiume Board President Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship Jesse Passafiume - 3/29/2018


Please fund the great work this team does! I have enjoyed these trails for 20 years and now my kids ride Downieville, as will theirs one day! The trail system there is a gem but only because the hard work put in by the Stewardship team. Blair Cunningham - 3/29/2018


I am writing in support of the SBTS grant application. Because of their trail building and maintenance efforts, I, along with friends, traveled to Downieville, Graeagle and other parts of the Lost Sierra. The trails are fantastic, so we've come back many times. I'm looking forward to riding the new section of the Mills Peak trail, and I'm thankful for everything SBTS does to maintain and build these trails. Supporting them will continue to bring visitors like me from out of town to ride and spend money. Graham Archer - 3/29/2018


I am writing in support of the SBTS grant application. Because of their trail building and maintenance efforts, I, along with friends, traveled to Downieville, Graeagle and other parts of the Lost Sierra. The trails are fantastic, so we've come back many times. I'm looking forward to riding the new section of the Mills Peak trail, and I'm thankful for everything SBTS does to maintain and build these trails. Supporting them will continue to bring visitors like me from out of town to ride and spend money. Graham Archer - 3/29/2018


I love Downieville and the work SBTS does. Please give them the resources they need to continue to do what they do. adam schwarcz - 3/29/2018


I think this is a very worthy grant. These trails need annual maintenance to recover from winter storms and to become better over time. I am confident that SBTS has done a great job in the past and will be able to continue maintaining trails in this area with the approval of this grant. The multiplier of these trails on the local economy make this a great investment of grant fund dollars! Frank Nann - 3/29/2018


This organization is doing great work for a wide variety of trail users. They have an excellent volunteer program where volunteers are able to work to create new trails and maintain existing ones. In addition to local users who benefit from the trail stewardship provided by SBTS, this work also helps to bring in the tourist dollar, strengthening the local community and economy: the trails created and maintained by SBTS have a nationwide following. Please support SBTS. David Martin - 3/29/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. Morgan Lashley - 3/29/2018


The entire Downieville OHV trail system requires annual maintenance to ensure that conditions sustain or improve. General maintenance includes but is not limited to: log out, brushing, hazard tree removal, braking bump removal, tread repair, tread buffing, large debris removal and the enhancement or construction of drainage structures. Morgan Lashley - 3/29/2018


I am have participating and using work done for Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship for over 20 years. The work they greatly benefits the outdoor lifestyle I enjoy in California. Adam Preuss - 3/30/2018


I a m fan and benefit of the work performed by the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and it's leaders for over 20 years. The work they do is of great public benefit. I support this grant application for continued maintenance. Adam Preuss - 3/30/2018


I support this project as it is a great example of local non-profit working with US Forest Service to maintain trails on the Tahoe National Forest. The trail maintenance completed protects habitat and watersheds while keeping access to public lands open and safe. As Sierra County grows and diversifies its economy, these recreation based trails help bring visitors to the area while increases local's quality of life. Engaging the public and volunteers shows the support of the community for this project. Johnnie Smith - 3/30/2018


I make several trips each year to use the trails maintained by Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. They do a great job maintaining the large trail network and make it one of the best places to ride motorcycles and mountain bikes in California. Colin Duwe - 3/30/2018


ThankYou for taking my comments.As a 30 yr resident of this area I strongly support SBTS and the good works they have done and continue to do.Not only are they passionate about this area and keeping it maintained.but they provide much needed jobs in our community where unemployment is high.I would urge you to please consider all the positive's that will come out of a well thought out maintinence program. Thank You marc cosbey - 3/31/2018


Thank You for tacking my comments.I have been living in this area for thirty yr .Both riding motos and mt bikes,I want to stress how important the good works that SBTS has done up here through the years.I know of nowhere else where a group of people has so passionately taken it upon them self's to respect and passionately take care of this area.Recreation is our last way of making our lives up here.So I would encourage you to help us continue to thrive in this beautiful area in which we live.Thank You marc cosbey - 3/31/2018


Here is a valuable grant to support a forest with a lot of OHV routes and usage. Good luck getting the word out and I hope to see you up there while I am dual sporting around. Ed Stovin - 3/31/2018


Below are my questions and concerns for information provided on the evaluation criteria form: # Project Type Project Title Grant Request Match Total Project Cost 2013-14 G13-04-02-R01 Restoration (Baldy Mesa) 1,105,422 388,611 1,494,033 2014-15 G14-04-02-R01 Restoration (NO Projects) 664,152 694,425 1,358,577 2015-16 Not applied for Previous ‘3’ uncompleted 0 0 0 2016-17 G16-04-02-R01 Restoration (Rattlesnake, Baldy Mesa – East, Bee Canyon & Cleghorn Ridge) 985,704 517,620 1,503,624 2013-14 G13-04-02-S01 Education & Safety 96,281 304,907 401,188 2014-15 G14-04-02-S01 Education & Safety 85,514 275,230 360,744 2015-16 G15-04-02-S01 Education & Safety 105,461 349,310 454,771 2016-17 G16-04-02-R01 Education & Safety 107,648 371,170 478,818 2013-14 TOTAL for BOTH Rest + Ed & Sfty 1,201,703 693,518 1,895,221 2014-15 TOTAL for BOTH Rest + Ed & Sfty 749,666 969,655 1,719,321 2015-16 TOTAL for ALL Education & Safety 105,461 349,310 454,771 2016-17 TOTAL for ALL Rest + Ed & Sfty 1,093,352 888,790 1,982,442 WHAT HAS CHANGED FROM YEARS PAST? ONLY AN INCREASE IN GREED FOR GREENBACKS (AND THOSE ARE "OUR OHV FUNDS") THAT FUND A PRIVATE, DISCRIMINATORY GROUP SUCH AS THIS ONE HAS PROVEN TO BE !!! (From 2014-15 application) 5. For Applicant’s OHV grant Projects which reached the end of the Project performance period within the last two years, the percentage of all Projects closed out in accordance with Program regulations: Restoarion (their mis-spelling): G08-04-02-R01; Grant Period 7/1/09 - 6/30/12 & G09-04-02-R01; Grant Period 8/11/10 - 8/10/13 Safety & Ed: G10-04-02-S01; Grant Period: 7/13/11 - 7/12/12 & G11-04-02-S01; Grant Period 7/13/12 - 7/12/13 ONCE AGAIN I REITERATE MY POINT !!! It was filled in as 100% of deliverable accomplished yet I have personally been in these areas lately and have not seen ANYTHING resembling full completion of these projects. ONCE AGAIN, this was not addressed years prior and I expect it won’t be addressed this year either…WHY? ABUSE OF OUR OHV PROGRAM BY THIS PRIVATE ENTERPRISE WHO CONTINUES TO MASQUERADE AS AN OHV-FRIENDLY, NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION NEEDS TO BE PUT TO A STOP AND NOW !!! “SCMF staff hosted two publicly noticed meetings with the general public to review the grant process and discuss the proposed project. Meetings were 'allegedly" held 1) February 6th, 2018; 6pm-8pm at the Forest Service Supervisors Office in San Bernardino and 2) February 7th, 2017; 7pm-9pm at Sizzler Restaurant in Corona, CA” ONCE AGAIN, these so-called “public meetings” were ONLY announced via their SBNFA-OHV “PRIVATE” bulletin board which is NOT made available to the general public. Only their members of this PRIVATE CLUB can access this site and has been this way since early 2011. The Sizzler Restaurant management STILL INSISTS that ALL attendees MUST purchase a meal when entering into the restaurant to attend this so-called ‘public meeting”. This MUST be changed to a more tolerable venue for MY green sticker funds to ever be considered to fund ANYTHING this group does. “SCMF's OHV program provides multiple hands on and formal class trainings…we attend dealerships, industry trade shows and host kiosks where we distribute printed materials including; maps, brochures, and educational CD's and DVD's”. ONCE AGAIN, I REITERATE THIS POINT !!! This ‘training’ is ONLY made available to their “PRIVATE CLUB” members and not to the general public to where the true education is actually intended to reach. Take into consideration that they have lowered their On the Right Trail presentations from 24 in 2011 to 15 in 2012 and THEN from a mere 6 in 2013 to ZERO in 2014, 2015 AND 2016/17 cycles! What did they have in store for their 2017-18 grant? What was delivered the year prior? How about yet ANOTHER great big GOOSE EGG! ONCE AGAIN, they claim, “providing education on site, leading "On the Right Trail" education presentations at visitor centers and schools” YET NO CLASSROOM PRESENTATIONS LISTED !! THAT’S RIGHT, FOLKS - ZERO AGAIN… NOTHING… NADA… ZILCH!! What happened and WHY, WHY, WHY? “ATV Safety Institute and/or Motorcycle Safety Foundation approved training courses are provided to the public”: This is NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC by any means and they should not be given a point. You have to a member of the volunteer program or a forest service employee. Three years ago (maybe it was four), this group applied for a Restoration Grant (with no active restoration project mentioned anywhere). At that time, they claimed 100% of Projects closed out (10 points). Two years ago, they requested funds for a Program Assistant to the tune of $7,500 for 500 hours of work. AGAIN, Just three years ago, they asked for 2 positions to be funded at $55,,000+ each for THREE YEARS within a ONE YEAR GRANT totaling more than $165,000 !! ONCE AGAIN, An “OHV Patrol Volunteer Coordinator (applied for in the most covert, fiendishly stealthy and downright sneaky fashion) for TWO YEARS SALARY OF $94,890 ($47,445 per year) within a ONE CALENDAR YEAR PRESCRIBED RESTORATION GRANT !! I can possibly understand one (1) position which is applied for within the Education & Safety Grant but why another – ESPECIALLY with what was applied for three years ago and AGAIN TWO YEARS AGO AND LAST YEAR AS WELL !?! By their own admission, the element of ‘recruiting…and monitoring “volunteers” is mentioned. This very element is supposed to be handled by the Volunteer Coordinator – a position they apply for grant funding for within their Safety & Education Grant to the tune of $52,951 (up from $51,480 last year, $50,086 two years ago, $49,610 three years ago & $48,000 four years ago). RAISES FOR WHAT AND WHY WITH MY $$$ ??? Three years ago, it was a “PART TIME” Program Assistant “Intern” for 15 hours a week to the tune of $12,000 a year PLUS… $10,350 in personal vehicle fuel expenses. Last year, the SAME position was only $7,500 and calling the position a part time fulfillment in the request. THIS YEAR, it is back up to a whopping $10,980 of OUR $$$ !!! IN THEIR OWN WORDS, “The Program Assistant is responsible for implementing program deliverables during the busy summer/fall season. SCMF will hire a full-time seasonal paid intern working directly with the Education Outreach Coordinator. The “busy Summer/Fall Season” they claim? NOW, If the other two seasons are NOT BUSY, then why the need for a requested OHV Patrol Volunteer Coordinator within the Restoration Grant? WHY APPLY FOR THAT POSITION WHICH IS CLEARLY ANOTHER “FANCIFULLY CONJURED” NAME FOR AN EDUCATION OUTREACH COORDINATOR? FIRST RULE OF GOVERNMENT SPENDING, WHY BUY ONE WHEN YOU CAN HAVE TWO FOR TWICE THE PRICE?! WELL, I sense SCMF will be licking their lips and rub their hands together contemplating the awarding of MORE $$$ from OUR TAX DOLLARS !!! THEIR GREED FOR GREEN BACKS KNOW NO BOUNDS !!! Could this turn out to be “double dipping”? LIKELY a contingency plan should one of the other two positions are not funded? If so, it should be disallowed. LAST YEAR, they were DENIED any and all "MILEAGE" funding... BRAVO !!! BUT, this year, they have covertly hidden this request within the 'Indirect Costs' tab which they exclaim," The indirect rate is Administrative Costs that include Administrative salaries, rents, supplies, communication, MILEAGE, and salary for the 32 hrs/year that the OHV Coordinator uses to train his volunteers. COVERTLY demanding $10,569 which was denied just last year. I SAY NO, NO, NOOOO !!!! They brag so heavily about the work of the OHV Volunteers AND of the Adopt-A-Trail Program so why not utilize them? Maybe it’s about money once again. Bottom line, it appears they are spending too much money on employees Safety and Education Grant - Not in support of this Grant Based on only 1.5 million dollars available for the entire state (up from 1.3 just last year), ONCE AGAIN, THIS Grant applicant is asking for just under 10% of the available funds. NOW, they sneakily hide the application of funding an OHV Patrol Volunteer Coordinator within the Restoration Grant (for Two Years SALARY, no less!). The available funds need to be shared more evenly throughout all the Grant applicants. Below are my recommendations for this Grant applicant. Staff: OHV Program Coordinator position should be for a total of 30 hours per week – NO MORE THAN THAT !! Why would WE, the tax payers, allow for the funding of $98,925 for TWO of the EXACT SAME POSITIONS PER YEAR ( WAY up from $50,086 last year, from $49,610 two years ago and from $48,000 the year prior to that) for position(s) whose main objective(s) is/are “recruiting” new volunteers for this “PRIVATE CLUB”? An alarming fact: In 2012, this applicant proposed 24 ORT presentations. Then in 2013, they had decreased by half to just twelve (12). In 2014, it had been cut again to a mere six (6). For 2015, We DID NOT see ANY ORT presentations listed yet they are asking for MUCH MORE MONEY for less deliverables. In the three years after, NONE, NONE, NO ORTs PROVIDED !!! This is not a sound business practice and proper use of funds. Truly, this looks a lot like more money for less work to US, the tax payers! Material and Supplies: In the categories of Brochures and Signs, they seem redundant. There are printing costs associated with each category and it should be a bundled request not separated. They are asking for more money than is actually needed. This year, total is back up to $24,000 once again ( $25,000 last year, $25,000 three years ago and $20,000 four years ago) sure seems excessive for printing needs for one year. In 2012, they were granted $8,000 minus the match which seemed to do just fine. They are MORE THAN TRIPLING the costs of 2012 and have done this the last three years… this seems VERY SUSPICIOUS !! Especially in today’s world of technology, they can put these materials on line and people can chose to print for themselves. SIGNS TO THE TUNE OF $4000… Good grief !!! Their request states the following: “Funding for sign development and printing cost associated with updating stationary kiosk along the trail and at staging areas with maps, well-defined rules and regulations and area specific information and replacing designated vehicle route signs (DVR's) as needed. AGAIN, they are asking for money for maps which was also requested in “Brochures” in the line item above within their grant request… NO MORE !!! Equipment Use Expenses: Other – Mileage Reimbursement – HIDDEN WITHIN INDIRECT COSTS)!! It seems that the amount being requested can be reduced to approximately $3000…Though it is down to $10,569. Not the proposed ASTRONOMICAL AMOUNT OF 18,000 miles a year ago or $9,620 for a PERSONAL “FUN RIDE” VEHICLE (claimed $9,720 two years ago though that was down from $10,350 three years ago). THE EDUCATION OUTREACH COORDINATOR resides a mere 8-12 miles away from either the Discovery Center in Fawnskin or the North Shore Work Center in Lake Arrowhead. So, how in the hell do they justify / claim / request $10,600 for a LIKELY FALSIFIED 18,000 miles a year? AUDIT !!! AUDIT !!! AUDIT !!! A RESTORATION COORDINATOR was requested last year to tune of $59,467 per year (two years’ worth of salary being $118,934 within a ONE YEAR GRANT) !!! WHEN WILL THIS MADNESS BE PUT TO AN END ?!?! AS FOR MILEAGE, they should use a monthly stipend of $100 per month for travel as this would require the employee to keep track of his/her mileage and receipts for gas. (The volunteers do not receive reimbursement or a stipend for their gas/mileage). Also, the Program Director and other SCMF staff have access to Forest Service vehicles to travel from the office which would greatly reduce the amount they are requesting. Equipment Purchase - Other: In 2013, the SCMF asked for $18,000 to fund a Mobile Education Kiosk – that was $18,000 for a branding message. What have we received for this – a branding message and not much more than that! I have only ever seen this vehicle at ONE (1) trade show, the Sand Sports Super Show and NOT ANY OTHERS. This IS nothing more than another “recruitment tool” and a waste of tax payer’s money. Other – Trade Show Fees – OH MY GOSH !!! SEVENTY-FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS AGAIN !! WHAT IS GOING ON HERE ?!?! Two years ago, they had claimed that funds ($2,400 they were requesting) goes toward exhibitor fees for the Off-Road Expo in Pomona, CA & the Intl Motorcycle Show in Long Beach, CA. THEIR CLAIM: “Costs have increased this year to cover extra space for our large mobile education exhibit created with OHMVR funds two years ago and to reflect significant increases in price structure for all shows and these groups no longer providing nonprofit free or discounted rates. THIS IS SIMPLY NOT TRUE AS DISTRICT 37 DUAL SPORT AND BIG BEAR TRAIL RIDERS (AND CORVA, ALL 3 mentioned ARE 501.c3 ‘Non-Profit Organizations) HAVE ALWAYS BEEN “COMP’D” A SPACE AT THE VERY SAME SHOWS THIS GROUP IS REQUESTING OUR TAX DOLLARS FOR !!! SCMF Leadership claims they simply do not have the time nor the resources to facilitate working with promoters to receive a “Comp’d” (FREE) space. WITH THE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS IN SALARIES THEY REQUEST (VIA OUR TAX DOLLARS), THEY MOST CERTAINLY DO HAVE BOTH THE TIME AND RESOURCES… WE ARE PAYING FOR IT … ENOUGH !!! We feel that these trade shows and expos are still one of the best ways to educate thousands of OHV enthusiasts on responsible recreation on public lands“ THEY USE THESE TRADE SHOWS TO “RECRUIT” NEW VOLUNTEERS AND USE OUR TAX DOLLARS BY WAY OF ‘So-Called’ PROMOTER-INSISTED SHOW FEES TO DO THIS? AS I UNDERSTAND IT… LEGALLY SPEAKING… THIS IS AGAINST THE RULES AS STATED IN REGULATIONS SET FORTH BY THE GRANT PROGRAM PROCESS & ACCOMPANYING STATUTES PERTAINING TO IMPLEMENTATION !! SCMF further claims this as an increase to cover space for their large mobile education exhibit created with OHMVR funds three years ago. This group also claims they were unable to bring it to these events due to lack of funding last year (and the year prior). I CAN’T EMPHACIZE THIS ENOUGH !!! At the Off Road Expo, the last four-plus years and more, they were openly & actively “RECRUITING” new volunteers from the attending public. They continue to do this at ALL shows they attend. AGAIN, AGAIN, I ASK… Why are public funds being utilized by a “private club” for the purpose of recruitment? ONCE AGAIN, for an education and safety grant there is not much being asked for on either point; education or safety. The restoration grant is OUT OF CONTROL and needs to be scaled back by 60+ percent (at least) TOO MUCH GREED, FAR TOO MUCH REQUESTED LEAVING EVERY OTHER APPLICANT LACKING GREATLY !! As for Education and Safety, this is absolutely a fluff piece grant and the money should be used to further educate the public on safety. Time to spead the wealth, so to speak, and give other MORE WORTHY applicants a helping hand… NOT SCMF !! Danny Simmerman - 4/2/2018


DISTRICTS

While appreciating the work gone into creating a OHV park, I am very concerned about the impacts of ATV's, Dirt Bikes, Side by Sides, 4 x 4 Sand Dune buggies with regards to habitat, soil, water, run off, species, dust, noise, local residents and neighbors, and others that would like to bird, hike, bike, mushroom or ride a horse in a quiet setting. 586 acres is a lot of land only 2 miles out of Fort Bragg. This area may also, not unlike Big River, provide opportunities for quiet, outdoor activities. Recognizing that this property has not had its potential realized, I hope that it can be used for many different activities rather than only a OHV park. Thank you, Melissa Hays Melissa Hays - 3/13/2018


This letter of support for Grant # G17-07-11-P01 (Regional Park Plan) is being submitted on behalf of the BlueRibbon Coalition/Sharetrails.org (BRC), a national non-profit trail-based recreation group. BRC has reviewed the planning grant request and believes this effort to site a “coastal” OHV park in the Fort Bragg area to provide legal riding opportunities for both residents and tourists would benefit the local economy and enhance California’s diverse recreation opportunity matrix. Last year, the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) published its 2017 Outdoor Recreation Economy Report that outdoor recreation generates $887 billion dollars in consumer spending and employs 7.6 million Americans. LINK TO OIA 2017 REPORT https://outdoorindustry.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/OIA_RecEconomy_FINAL_Single.pdf This report highlights and details the significant economic impact that both motorized and non-motorized recreation has in this country. The OIA report is further supported by new prototype statistics from the Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account (ORSA) released on February 18, 2018 by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) show that the outdoor recreation economy accounted for 2.0 percent ($373.7 billion) of current-dollar GDP in 2016 (table 1). In addition, the outdoor recreation economy grew 3.8 percent in 2016, compared to growth of 2.8 percent in the overall economy. The BEA stated that the historical lack of detailed federal data regarding outdoor recreational activities has handicapped both the private and public sectors. They also said the release is a milestone for business executives, small-business owners, entrepreneurs, and government officials, who will rely on these detailed data to plan, grow, and gain new insights into this dynamic part of the U.S. economy. LINK TO BEA REPORT https://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/industry/orsa/orsanewsrelease.htm The BEA data showed that Motorized Vehicles was the largest activity within conventional outdoor recreation in 2016, accounting for $59.4 billion of gross output. Recreational vehicles accounted for more than half of this value at $30.0 billion. A legal and well managed OHV park in the Fort Bragg area would also aid local law enforcement efforts to address illegal riding by directing OHV use to a designated facility designed to offer sustainable OHV recreation for current and future generations. Please keep BRC posted on this important endeavor and on how we may be of assistance if this grant is approved. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/15/2018


A new park on the north coast is not only a great idea but long overdue. Legal, sustainable recreation opportunities would benefit the local economy and be great for tourism and local residents. Local law enforcement would now have a place to direct riders looking for safe, legal opportunities to enjoy with their friends and families. Nick Haris - 3/20/2018


I support the OHV grant proposal for the Mendocino Coast Recreation and Parks District, Regional Park Plan. As a previous resident of Ft. Bragg, Mendocino County, I can attest to the lack of organized, structured and managed OHV recreation sites. This park would solve a lot of local and destination issues with people trying to find a place to enjoy the north coast/Ft. Bragg with OHV’s. The existing logging and skid trails would make for a natural and easy transition to managed recreation. By having a Master Plan provided by this grant, the area could seriously benefit with future managed OHV use. Having an Advisory Committee to steer the planning of the new park just makes total sense and fits in with sustainability and good managed recreation. Please add me to the list of supporters of this grant. Del Del Albright Ambassador, Sharetrails/BlueRibbon Coalition 2014 Inductee, Off-Road Motorsports Hall of Fame Founding Trail Boss, Friends of the Rubicon www.rubiconfriends.com Life Member, BRC and CA4WDC Co-Chair, FMCA 4Wheelers, Keep Our Trails Open Find Del on Facebook here Find BRC on Facebook here. Del Albright - 3/20/2018


As president of the Oakland Motorcycle Club, I want to express the club's strong support for an OHV park near Fort Bragg, as proposed in Planning Grant G16-07-11-P01. A legal place to participate in off-road recreation will not only reduce off-road use of private lands, it will provide badly needed economic benefit to the area. The Oakland Motorcycle Club is a 110-year-old organization of riders who have recreated in the Fort Bragg and Mendocino County area for over 50 years. We have organized the Sheetiron 300 Dualsport event for 26 years and counting. This event travels from Stonyford to Fort Bragg and back each year on the third weekend of May, and since it sells out with 500 riders each year, it demonstrates both the demand for this type of legal recreation and the positive economic benefits for the area. We wholeheartedly urge the adoption of this plan. Brent Snyder - 3/21/2018


The Dorothy King Young Chapter (DKY) of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) focuses on protection of, and education about native plant species and natural habitats that occur within coastal Mendocino County, roughly from the Pacific Ocean to the coastal mountains west of Highway 101. One of the most significant and highly imperiled rare natural communities, which is limited in distribution to the Mendocino Coast, is the Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodland (pygmy forest). This community, which includes vegetation of both short and tall stature, was estimated to cover about 4,200 acres in 2006. In 2016, surveys by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) found that only 1,480 acres of pygmy forest remain. Of the remaining, approximately 20% occurs on the 586-acre Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District (MCRPD) property that is now used for OHV training, and for which an OHV park is being planned. Another rare natural plant community, the Bishop pine forest, which is also in decline in California, occurs over much of the 586 acres. The highly imperiled and rare “Sholars Bog” is located on an adjacent, downstream parcel. Wetlands are prevalent throughout the property and are critical to the health of the pygmy forest. A magnificent old growth redwood, a rare specimen with cavities that provide valuable wildlife habitat, is also there. CNPS submitted comment letters to the MCRPD in regards to the proposed OHV park programmatic EIR for which they received OHMVR funding in the previous grant cycle. Our comments emphasized two main points: 1) the site selected is inappropriate for an OHV park, and 2) a programmatic EIR is the wrong CEQA document to use, rather a project EIR should be prepared. The MCRPD has already received $3,000,000 in grant funding through the OHMVR Division for both restoration and planning. The Restoration grant proposal, which was awarded $2,739,829, was not circulated for public review and comment under CEQA but was given a Categorical Exemption from CEQA by the lead agency, which is the California Department of Parks and Recreation. We fail to understand how a project that proposes the removal of rare vegetation, including potentially listed plant species, and proposes ground disturbance activities that will alter drainage patterns to the detriment of a rare vegetation type can be exempt from the CEQA review process. The MCRPD, the California Recreation Alliance (CRA), and the OHMVR Division should have been fully aware of environmental concerns on the 586-acre property from comments received in 2015, including from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), on a similar restoration grant application that the MCRPD submitted to the OHMVR Division. In addition, CNPS and other environmental organizations raised several serious concerns in the mid-2000’s regarding potential impacts on rare vegetation and plants when the MCRPD proposed a golf-course on the same 586-acre property. We have visited the site and it appears that, in several locations, recent attempts were made to drain sections of severely eroding road surfaces by using heavy equipment to construct ditches that divert water. By channelizing and draining water away from areas that support pygmy forest, the actions compound cumulative impacts of the proposed projects (training, restoration, and OHV park) by changing the hydrology, exacerbating severe downcutting, and further mobilizing highly erosive soils. Pygmy forest is characterized by shallow, saturated soils, and the species that grow there have evolved and are dependent upon the wetland environment. The “pygmy forest” is actually both the shorter forest type that occurs on Blacklock soils and taller versions that occur on better soils. The vegetation is still rare if the Mendocino Pygmy cypress (Heperocyparis pygmaea) is part of the dominant cover of trees. The restoration grant proposal included funding for the purchase and rental of off-road vehicles and heavy equipment, and for fencing. Continued use of this motorized equipment as described in the restoration proposal and as evidenced on-site will further degrade the sensitive habitats. Installation of barrier fences is an important action for preventing illegal OHV access, but we caution that the work needs to be conducted carefully and with constraints to avoid significant impacts through areas where rare plants and vegetation occur. This new planning grant is the third proposal submitted by the MCRPD for OHMVR grant funding to plan and develop an OHV park on the 586-acre property. The stated objective is to “fund the creation of a Master Plan for the MCRPD OHV Park.” Yet, the previous year’s funded planning proposal stated: “This project is to complete the environmental research to see if this project would be possible. This project is also to complete an economic feasibility study to determine if this project would be beneficial financially to the area.” It appears that the MCRPD has prematurely determined that the feasibility study and environmental research will deem that an OHV Park is appropriate and feasible for the property, prior to even conducting the analysis and completing the environmental review processes that are required to make those determinations. One of the arguments used to justify development of a MCRPD OHV park is that illegal OHV use is already damaging the property, and that having a legal OHV park will prevent the illegal use that occurs on timberland and in State Parks. This argument simply does not make sense. Why trade damage that is occurring on other forested properties for environmental damage to sensitive habitats on MCRPD land? How can the MCRPD claim to be concerned about the impacts of illegal OHV use, while at the same time allowing OHV training on the trails that further exacerbates the impacts to rare natural communities? Comprehensive enforcement is needed on the coast and funding is available through the OHMVR Division for that purpose, without any requirement to develop an OHV park. Simply giving people a legal place to ride without enforcing regulations where people ride OHVs illegally will NOT curtail illegal riding, especially when there are thousands of acres of remote land that can be accessed from multiple points, used without paying fees, and used without active enforcement. If the argument is that OHVs should be allowed somewhere, then the logical thing would be to select property that is suited for that use…not on pygmy and bishop pine forests, not in wetlands, and not near residential areas off Highway 20. CNPS recommends that the MCRPD abandon the OHV proposal and instead, pursue funding for appropriate and effective restoration and enforcement included in a project that promotes passive, non-motorized recreational use and education about the unique and sensitive natural environments of the Mendocino Coast. We urge the OHMVR Division to stop providing funding to the MCRPD and the CRA that further promotes the inappropriate use of this property for OHV park development. Renee Pasquinelli Conservation Co-chair (north) CNPS Dorothy King Young Chapter Renee Pasquinelli - 3/21/2018


As a member of the Oakland Motorcycle Club I support of the proposed Planning grant G16-07-11-P01. This is much a need family legal OHV opportunity. Brian Jagger - 3/21/2018


Friends of Cow Mountain strongly supports this grant application. This is a great opportunity to provide a legal and sustainable riding opportunity on the Mendocino Coast and resolve long term trespass issues. Ron McDonell Vice President Friends of Cow Mountain Ron McDonell - 3/21/2018


We have significant concerns about the proposal by the Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District (MCRPD) to create an Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Park on their 586 acre property in Fort Bragg. It would be located two miles east of Highway 1, at the intersection of Highway 20 and Summers Lane. We want to register our strong opposition to this project which we feel is fraught with a vast range of disturbing issues. The property has sensitive habitats including the rare pygmy forest and Northern Bishop Pine forest, it is the water run-off for Newman Gulch – a water source for the city of Fort Bragg - and is nearby, and shares a watershed with, the rare Scholars Sphagnum Bog. These critical habitats would be threatened by the proposed OHV Park and need to be protected. Local biologist Theresa Scholars and others (California Native Plant Society, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and California State Parks) have extensive knowledge of these endangered habitats. We know that OHV parks are intensive users of water to control dust. Where will this water come from? Proceeding with this proposal would require careful monitoring for the multiple negative environmental and social effects of OHVs. These include erosion, habitat destruction, air and soil pollution, water contamination, as well as dust and noise pollution. Costly infrastructure and administrative capacity would be necessary to deal with these problems. We are concerned about MCRPD's claim to monitor all these aspects. In addition, there are concerns that the long history of illegal OHV use of the property would continue. What are the provisions for patrolling and monitoring, and who will hold liability for accidents, deaths and property destruction? This project is being pursued through grants in collaboration with California Recreation Alliance, which claims their primary aim is to train children – as young as 6 or 7 years old – to operate OHVs. We feel that it reflects extremely poor judgment by MCRPD to promote the use of OHVs by children on their land. In addition, the whole 586 acres would be available to any and all OHV operators who wish to use it. Although the proposed OHV Park is outside Fort Bragg city limits, there are numerous residents who live in close proximity to the MCRPD property. We share concerns with many of our fellow residents regarding noise and traffic congestion. Lastly, there is a long history of inadequate notification by MCRPD of public meetings regarding proposals for development of this property. It is critical that adequate notification for public meetings and input utilize PSAs on the radio, social media, and flyers posted in the community, in addition to the newspapers. Larry Heiss & Gayle Heiss - 3/22/2018


BRC understands the concerns from the Native Plant Society, but we believe there are many examples throughout the state where the resource was improved at defacto riding areas when modern science-based OHV mitigation measures were implemented such as designating sustainable roads, trails, and areas, use of trail delineators, exclosures or enclosures to protect sensitive habitat, law enforcement, safety/education, armoring trails in wet areas or relocating trails out of a sensitive riparian area or stream, installation of OHV bridges, and building or reconstructing engineered trails to address soil erosion/water quality, etc. BRC hopes the conservation community can come together in some form or fashion to at least support this planning grant to ascertain if a sustainable OHV program should or could be located in the project footprint. Donald AmadorBRC - 3/23/2018


Agency: Mendocino Coast Recreation and Parks District Project: Regional Park Plan Reference: G17-07-11-P01 We have significant concerns about the proposal by the Mendocino Coast Recreation and Park District (MCRPD) to create an Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Park on their 586 acre property in Fort Bragg. It would be located two miles east of Highway 1, at the intersection of Highway 20 and Summers Lane. We want to register our strong opposition to this project which we feel is fraught with a vast range of disturbing issues. The property has sensitive habitats including the rare pygmy forest and Northern Bishop Pine forest, it is the water run-off for Newman Gulch – a water source for the city of Fort Bragg - and is nearby, and shares a watershed with, the rare Scholars Sphagnum Bog. These critical habitats would be threatened by the proposed OHV Park and need to be protected. Local biologist Theresa Scholars and others (California Native Plant Society, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and California State Parks) have extensive knowledge of these endangered habitats. We know that OHV parks are intensive users of water to control dust. Where will this water come from? Proceeding with this proposal would require careful monitoring for the multiple negative environmental and social effects of OHVs. These include erosion, habitat destruction, air and soil pollution, water contamination, as well as dust and noise pollution. Costly infrastructure and administrative capacity would be necessary to deal with these problems. We are concerned about MCRPD's claim to monitor all these aspects. In addition, there are concerns that the long history of illegal OHV use of the property would continue. What are the provisions for patrolling and monitoring, and who will hold liability for accidents, deaths and property destruction? This project is being pursued through grants in collaboration with California Recreation Alliance, which claims their primary aim is to train children – as young as 6 or 7 years old – to operate OHVs. We feel that it reflects extremely poor judgment by MCRPD to promote the use of OHVs by children on their land. In addition, the whole 586 acres would be available to any and all OHV operators who wish to use it. Although the proposed OHV Park is outside Fort Bragg city limits, there are numerous residents who live in close proximity to the MCRPD property. We share concerns with many of our fellow residents regarding noise and traffic congestion. Lastly, there is a long history of inadequate notification by MCRPD of public meetings regarding proposals for development of this property. It is critical that adequate notification for public meetings and input utilize PSAs on the radio, social media, and flyers posted in the community, in addition to the newspapers. Larry Heiss & Gayle Heiss Larry Heiss - 3/29/2018


Please See Attached Document. Dan Keyes, MCRPD District Administrator - 3/30/2018


In addition to the earlier comments that the Dorothy King Young Chapter of the California Native Plant Society submitted in regards to grant application G17-07-11-P01, we wish to add the following: At the heart of our concerns, is a fundamental lack of scientific understanding about the rare plant communities on the MCRPD property and of the impacts that are occurring with continued OHV use, including training activities. It appears that what the MCRPD is calling “pygmy forest” is a narrowly defined patch of low stature vegetation that is shown on proposed OHV park development maps as only occurring on the western portion of the property. This environmental determination appears to be based on out-of-date surveys conducted for a 2006 EIR for a previously proposed MCRPD golf course. When in fact, a rare (and legally protected) vegetation type, which is dominated by the Mendocino Pygmy cypress (Heperocyparis pygmaea), occurs on an estimated 70% of the property (based on recent vegetation classification surveys conducted by CDFW). The “pygmy forest” is actually both the shorter forest type that occurs on Blacklock soils and taller versions that occur on better soils. “Pygmy” cypress is still a listed rare plant, whether it occurs as a tall or short tree. As we have written in our comments, continued use of OHV vehicles on the roads, and the visible recent attempts to drain sections of severely eroding road surfaces by using heavy equipment, are compounding cumulative impacts by changing the hydrology, exacerbating severe downcutting, and further mobilizing highly erosive soils. Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodland is characterized by shallow, saturated soils, and the species that grow there have evolved and are dependent upon the wetland environment that is being impacted by OHV use. This is why we have continued to recommend that no additional OHV related activities occur on the property and that no OHV park design planning be attempted, at least until current protocol-level surveys, as defined by CDFW are completed and avoidance measures can be incorporated and implemented as is required under CEQA. We have sincerely offered to provide site-specific scientific information and to share our expertise in helping to plan for other uses that may be more environmentally appropriate for the 586 acres. We fear that misinformation, based on a lack of scientific understanding and documentation, is being used to perpetuate a false characterization of the vegetation on the property as one of being highly impacted from former logging activities and illegal OHV use. The majority of the property’s acreage, in fact, supports rare habitats that should be protected and on which meaningful restoration activities can successfully be conducted. Renee Pasquinelli - 4/2/2018