Skip to Main Content
Menu
Contact Us Search
Organization Title

Student Conservation Association

Preliminary Application Comments


 On behalf of myself and the Merced Dirt Riders Inc. (MDR) I would like to object to the grant application submitted by the California Wilderness Coalition together with the Student Conservation Association for the following reasons:

1. The stated goal of the project is to prevent OHV access into designated Wilderness areas. As written in section G:

Because of the nature of restoration, implementation of an efficient protection plan is at the center of this project. The need to have a sustainable solution to wilderness incursion will be applied through the following methods:
- Implementation of patrol
- Barriers

Please notice that the two proposed methods have no proposed signage, methods of interacting or educating the OHV riding or driving public, or any plans of incorporating help and/or assistance from OHV groups or organizations.

It must be recognized by conservation groups that any measure of success against OHV incursion on undesignated routes has to come with buy-in from the local OHV community. But instead of working with local OHV groups, the two groups requesting this grant from the OHV trust fund have completely ignored OHV groups and organizations. Partnerships may be the key to solving many problems associated with OHV vehicles entering undesignated areas, but those partnerships must include the OHV community, and working with the OHV riding and driving public.

Again in number 5 and number 8 under the Evaluation Criteria, it is stated that there is a publicly reviewed and adopted plan, and under number 8 the partner organizations are listed as: California Wilderness Coalition, BLM and the Student Conservation Association.

Since two of those entities are the organizations seeking this grant, there does not seem to be any partnership of local communities at all, other than with themselves. And again, there is no indication that this plan was adopted with the cooperation, help or understanding of the OHV community, or is there any indication that alternative routes for OHV activity have been proposed.

In conclusion, I would like to state that any success in restoration must include two critical components: the partnership of the OHV community with the proposing agency or organization, and the proposal or creation of alternate OHV routes for use by the OHV riding and driving public.

OHV recreation will not go away. By ignoring the OHV community, any plan for restoration will likely be doomed to failure. For this reason, and my concerns as stated above, I must object to this grant application. [Michael Damaso, President - 4/6/09]



 Hello. My name is Brendan Hughes and I would like to express my support for the Student Conservation Association's Grant Application for restoration funding. I have visited the El Pasos many times and have seen that they are in dire need of restoration to close and rehabilitate unauthorized routes and keep people on the legal trails. I believe this grant application should be fully funded.  [Brendan Hughes - 4/2/09]


 On behalf of myself and CORVA I would like to object to the grant application submitted by the California Wilderness Coalition together with the Student Conservation Association for the following reasons:

1. The stated goal of the project is to prevent OHV access into designated Wilderness areas. As written in section G:

Because of the nature of restoration, implementation of an efficient protection plan is at the center of this project. The need to have a sustainable solution to wilderness incursion will be applied through the following methods:
          - Implementation of patrol
          - Barriers

Please notice that the two proposed methods have no proposed signage, methods of interacting or educating the OHV riding or driving public, or any plans of incorporating help and/or assistance from OHV groups or organizations.

It must be recognized by conservation groups that any measure of success against OHV incursion on undesignated routes has to come with buy-in from the local OHV community. But instead of working with local OHV groups, the two groups requesting this grant from the OHV trust fund have completely ignored OHV groups and organizations. Partnerships may be the key to solving many problems associated with OHV vehicles entering undesignated areas, but those partnerships must include the OHV community, and working with the OHV riding and driving public.

Again in number 5 and number 8 under the Evaluation Criteria, it is stated that there is a publicly reviewed and adopted plan, and under number 8 the partner organizations are listed as: California Wilderness Coalition, BLM and the Student Conservation Association. Since two of those entities are the organizations seeking this grant, there does not seem to be any partnership of local communities at all, other than with themselves. And again, there is no indication that this plan was adopted with the cooperation, help or understanding of the OHV community, or is there any indication that alternative routes for OHV activity have been proposed.

In conclusion, I would like to state that any success in restoration must include two critical components: the partnership of the OHV community with the proposing agency or organization, and the proposal or creation of alternate OHV routes for use by the OHV riding and driving public.

OHV recreation will not go away. By ignoring the OHV community, any plan for restoration will likely be doomed to failure. For this reason, and my concerns as stated above, I must object to this grant application.  [Amy Granat, Northern Director, CORVA - 3/21/09]