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Golden Gate National Park Conservancy

Preliminary Application Comments


 Review the OHMVRD Website. A citation about OHV recreation is listed.

Synopsis:
"The purpose of the Grants Program is to provide for well managed OHV recreation by:

Providing financial assistance to eligible agencies and organizations that develop, maintain, operate, expand, support, or contribute to well managed, high-quality, OHV recreation areas. To maintain roads, and trails, and to responsibly maintain the wildlife, soils, and habitat of the project area in a manner that will sustain long-term OHV recreation in accordance with the legislative provisions and intent of the Act commencing at Public Resource Code Section 5091.01"

The OHMVRD has a stated Mission Statement:
The Mission of the OHMVR Division is to provide leadership statewide in the area of off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation; to acquire, develop, and operate state owned vehicular recreation areas (SVRAs), and to otherwise provide for a statewide system of managed OHV recreation opportunities through funding to other public agencies. To insure that quality recreational opportunities remain available for future generations by providing for education, conservation, and enforcement efforts that balance OHV recreation impact with programs that conserve and protect cultural and natural resources."

The Merced Dirt Riders (MDR) does not support any of your grant requests! Because we feel your grant application does not meet the criteria or scope of the restoration definition as outlined in your application, nor does it meet the intent as SB742 defined criteria. As you may know, San Mateo County has ZERO legal OHV opportunity available for legal and responsible OHV family recreation of any kind. Efforts were launched for years to create a legal facility, but time after time, the County Board of Supervisors rejected every effort to build some type of facility. To this day, NO legal opportunity exists for OHV recreationists in this county, nor in San Francisco or Marin Counties.

The MDR has supported Restoration Grants over the years, as long as some type of legal recreation exists, or has existed. But the sheer magnitude of funding requested with NO legal opportunity as outlined above and with the latest San Mateo County legal registered OHV users at only 9,745 (OHMVRD/DMV 5/31/08 Registered OHV Report). A near million dollar grant is not justified from a "user fee" based recreation program for an area that supplies no family OHV recreation of any type.

I must place emphasis that this 35 year old program is purely user funded, and thus, these monies have been generated strictly by the users and NO general tax obligation dollars have ever been used.

Based on your application responses:
1.) No OHV opportunity
2.) No answer given
3.) Land Manager has no legal OHV riding opportunity
4.) No OHV Trust Funds used
5.) N/A
6.) N/A
7.) Fenced area for No Trespass of OHV – YES – If no legal OHV is allowed inside the defined area, or legal, then this question and answer is moot.
8.) Educational. No points issued, less that 5 times per year on OHV education
9.) Outreach – website. None (see GGNPC attachments)
10.) NO outreach to OHV – No answer
11.) No strategies listed
12.) Soil monitoring – annually – no points
13.) Sound testing. Listed at less that 25% on holidays and weekends.

??? - If no OHV opportunity exists, how can ANY sound testing have taken place?

This grant application has listed for financial consideration, some of the following:

Over $400,000 for staff positions, $213,000 for "volunteer labor: (In Kind Value)(listed as Match Value to overall grant, species monitoring, (Red Legged Frog Egg Mass), $22,000 for Snake Exclusion fencing, $22,000 for benches (match) water bottles and t-shirts for volunteers, endangered species signage – interpretive, and nearly $100,000 in administrative costs. (10% of entire grant application...)

With this information, and many comments received by OHMVRD about this grant by others, both pro & con, MDR as an organization cannot support this grant in any form.

The applicant has NO OHV program of any kind, and based on the applicant’s website, none is planned for the future.

MDR makes a request of the OHMVRD to review its own Mission Statement, the Public Resource Code defining Restoration Grant Funding issued by the Division on behalf of the user community who has supplied the funding for such grants.

Restoration funding should be used in areas that offer, have offered, or propose to offer legal OHV recreation, and apply said restoration dollars to those areas as needed.

As stated by others, this Grant Application does NOT meet the intent or spirit of the restoration grant criteria as defined within SB742 in a collaborative working process of law including members of the OHV and environmental community working together. [Michael Damaso, President - 4/6/09]


 I wish to voice my concern and disapproval of this grant request.

No OHV funds should be granted for this request, The applicant has no OHV areas available, and cannot show that they ever did have areas available.

They have stated on their application "Many of the gullies and erosion problems were initiated during the past 60 years as a result of off-road use" yet on their website they list that a potion of the site was "a gravel-and sand-mining site". This it not how OHV fund monies should be spent. 

On the general application item # 7a
Is site a completely fenced facility such that OHV trespass into neighboring properties and/or closed areas is prevented?

the applicant has indicated Yes, yet Item 1a they indicate they have no OHV riding areas.

obviously the fence is to keep OHV use from entering their property, not to limit it from trespass onto neighboring property.

no points should be given for this response

Even though there is a surplus of monies in the Restoration category I urge you not to fund any of this request. [Rick Ferdon - 4/6/09]



 I just read the grant request for the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy restoration. While the work to be done in this grant may be worthwhile, in no way does it belong in the State's OHV grant program. This is not an OHV area or even near one. If it ever was used for OHV, not for decades. There is no OHV opportunity in this general area, much less in area controlled by this conservancy. This grant should not be scored low, it should be dismissed outright and removed from any consideration from our State OHV grant program. One million dollars of OHV money for what? How would this enhance OHV in California? [Ed Stovin, CORVA - 4/4/09]


 Review the OHMVRD Website. A citation about OHV recreation is listed.

Synopsis:

“The purpose of the Grants Program is to provide for well managed OHV recreation by providing financial assistance to eligible agencies and organizations that develop, maintain, operate, expand, support, or contribute to well managed, high-quality, OHV recreation areas, roads, and trails, and to responsibly maintain the wildlife, soils, and habitat of project area in a manner that will sustain long-term OHV recreation in accordance with the legislative provisions and intent of the Act commencing at Public Resource Code Section 5091.01”

The OHNVRD has a stated Mission Statement:

The Mission of the OHMVR Division is to provide leadership statewide in the area of off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation; to acquire, develop, and operate state owned vehicular recreation areas (SVRAs), and to otherwise provide for a statewide system of managed OHV recreation opportunities through funding to other public agencies. To insure that quality recreational opportunities remain available for future generations by providing for education, conservation, and enforcement efforts that balance OHV recreation impact with programs that conserve and protect cultural and natural resources.”

I preface the comments of the District 36 Motorcycle Sports Committee, [D36] because we feel your grant application does not meet the criteria or scope of the restoration definition as outlined in your application, nor does it meet the intent as SB742 defined criteria. As you may know, San Mateo County has ZERO legal OHV opportunity available for legal and responsible OHV family recreation of any kind. As a native San Mateo resident for many years, I fought hard for a legal OHV facility to be built somewhere in the county. Efforts were launched for years to create a legal facility, but time after time, the County Board of Supervisors rejected every effort to build some type of facility. To this day, NO legal opportunity exists for OHV recreationists in this county, nor its neighbors San Francisco or Marin Counties.

District 36 has supported Restoration Grants over the years, as long as some type of legal recreation exists, or has existed, but the sheer magnitude and funding requested, matched with NO legal opportunity as outlined above, and with the latest San Mateo County legal registered OHV users at only 9,745 (OHMVRD/DMV 5/31/08 Registered OHV Report) – a near million dollar grant is not justified from a “user fee” based recreation program for an area that supplies no family OHV recreation of any type.

I must place emphasis that this 3 &1/2 decade old program is purely user funded, and thus, these monies have been generated strictly by the users and NO general tax obligation dollars have ever been used.

Based on your application responses:
1.)    No OHV opportunity
2.)    No answer given
3.)    Land Manager has no legal OHV riding opportunity
4.)    No OHV Trust Funds used
5.)    N/A
6.)    N/A
7.)    Fenced area for No Trespass of OHV – YES – If no legal OHV is allowed inside the defined area, or legal, then this question and answer is moot.
8.)    Educational. No points issued, less that 5 times per year on OHV education
9.)    Outreach – website. None (see GGNPC attachments)
10.)  NO outreach to OHV – No answer
11.)  No strategies listed
12.)  Soil monitoring – annually – no points
13.)  Sound testing. Listed at less that 25% on holidays and weekends.

??? -  If no OHV opportunity exists, how can ANY sound testing have taken place?

This grant application has listed for financial consideration, some of the following:

Over $400,000 for staff positions, $213,000 for “volunteer labor: (In Kind Value)(listed as Match Value to overall grant, species monitoring, (Red Legged Frog Egg Mass), $22,000 for Snake Exclusion fencing, $22,000 for benches (match) water bottles and t-shirts for volunteers, endangered species signage – interpretive, and nearly $100,000 in administrative costs. (10% of entire grant application...)

With this information, and many comments received by OHMVRD about this grant by others, both pro & con, District 36 as an organization cannot support this grant in any form.

The applicant has NO OHV program of any kind, and based on the applicant’s website, none is planned for the future.

District 36 makes request of the OHMVRD to review its own Mission Statement, the Public Resource Code defining Restoration Grant Funding issued by the Division on behalf of the user community who has supplied the funding for such grants.

Restoration funding should be used in areas that offer, have offered, or propose to offer legal OHV recreation, and apply said restoration dollars to those areas as needed.

As stated by others, this Grant Application does NOT meet the intent or spirit of the restoration grant criteria as defined within  SB742 in a collaborative working process of law including members of the OHV and environmental community working together. [David Pickett, Legislative Action Officer Director, District 36 Motorcycle Sports Committee - 4/2/09]



 Link to letter of support from the Mayor of Pacifica [Julie Lancelle - 4-1-09]



 Link to comments that states the Coastal Conservancy's support of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy's Mori Point grant application.  [Janet Diehl - 4/1/09]



 Link to comments from Don Amador, Western Representative, BlueRibbon Coalition, Inc. [3/28/09]


 Link to comments from Jon Campo [3/27/09]


 As a neighbor, citizen, former member of the Pacifica Open Space Committee, Planning Commission and GGNRA/Pacifica Liaison Committee in combination and in excess of fourteen years, awarded a "City of Pacifica Appreciation Proclamation" for bringing conservation to the Planning Commission, a Conservancy Park Steward member, volunteer and activist for natural areas preservation for many years. I am requesting your assistance in granting the Golden Gate National Recreation Area Parks Conservancy's much needed funds to continue restoring and enhancing the Mori Point site.

This site is well on the way to being a show-case for listed species habitat and trail design/restoration. On several occasions I and others have had the esteemed privilege to see San Francisco Garter Snakes, and on many occasions Red Legged Frogs lounging around their newly developed wetlands, as they admire their many offspring. On many occasions others and I have meandered along the newly restored trails, that now provide suitable access to habitats and/or panoramic view locations. However unfortunately the historic land abuses, primarily from Off Road Vehicles, is still problematic in some areas. Habitat fragmentation, hydrology and visual scarring are the most obvious disturbances from the vehicles past activities.

The many times I have worked with the Conservancy's Site Stewardship Team I was impressed with their effort, enthusiasm, conscientiousness and congeniality. They have cultivated much respect and admiration, by many volunteers and park users. The restoration taking place there is well managed. I am more than confident the allocator of the grant funds will get their monies worth!

In conclusion it would be a deficit to enthusiasm, and detriment to the wildlife of concern, if the momentum of progress achieved and enjoyed by so many, were to be precluded by a monetary shortfall. I trust you will give judicious consideration with allocating the financial assistance available, and needed, to forward the GGNRA Conservancy's Mori Point restoration.

Thanks for your time and assistance. [Ron Maykel - 3/24/09]


 I am writing to express my strong support of the conservation, education, and stewardship efforts of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy (GGNPC) at Mori Point in Pacifica, CA.

My family was first introduced to Mori Point as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Areas Endangered Species Big Year 2008 program. We were struck by the beauty of Mori Point, the plight of the very endangered San Francisco garter snake and its favorite meal, the threatened red-legged frog, and the warm welcome from the GGNPC staff. Since then we have returned many times occasionally to play on the beach and say hello to the frogs or to participate in a regular workday, but most of the time to participate in service learning programs that we organize with the GGNPC.

Partnering with the GGNPC, we have introduced over 130 people to Mori Point, most of who enjoy the afternoon spent learning about Mori Point and helping with habitat restoration so much that they choose to return again and again. As one of our Moms summed it up, We always leave Mori Point feeling happy to have helped and satisfied to have learned something new. The ever-growing group of families includes kids ranging in age from less than 2 years old to 14 years old, their parents, and their grandparents. The GGNPC does a wonderful job with the mixed age group and we are especially thrilled that they are happy to welcome and invest time in the younger children. By helping children to help with planting native plants or removing invasive plants, the children learn that they really can make a difference and will continue to look for ways to do so as they grow up and in turn become the stewards of wonderful places such as Mori Point.

It has been wonderful to see the changes that have taken place at Mori Point this past year. Each time we return we see the thousands of new flags marking the spots where native plants have recently been planted at Mori Point and it is rewarding to know that over 1500 of those have been planted by our group. However, there is still much work that needs to be done in order to ensure the survival of the threatened red-legged frog and the endangered San Francisco garter snake.

Past off road vehicle use severely affected Mori Point. Erosion gullies, unnatural drainage, and soil deposition pose threats to the wetlands and grasslands that provide critical habitat for the endangered San Francisco garter snake and the threatened red-legged frog. Rehabilitation of the landscapes that have been impacted by off road vehicle use - planting native plants, removing invasive plants, and re-grading eroded slopes - would increase and enhance freshwater wetland habitat and provide habitat connectivity for the San Francisco garter snake.

My family volunteers with habitat restoration projects throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Volunteering at Mori Point continues to be one of our all time favorites Mori Point is beautiful, planting native plants and removing invasive plants is muddy fun, and the GGNPC staff is incredibly gracious, fun, friendly, and knowledgeable. We look forward to continuing to work with the GGNPC at Mori Point and, one of these days in the not too distant future, we hope that we will be able to watch a San Francisco garter snake enjoying its newly restored habitat. [Melissa Grush, PhD, Dry Creek Roots and Shoots - 3/21/09]


 My name is Brent Plater, and I am a faculty member within San Francisco State University’s Environmental Studies program.  Based on my research, I initiated a program at the Golden Gate National Recreation Area designed to increase public awareness about endangered species among non-traditional user groups of the park. The program, called the GGNRA Endangered Species Big Year, brought thousands of people into the GGNRA to see and help save each of the park’s endangered species. Two of the biggest draws—the California red-legged frog and the San Francisco garter snake—were most accessible at Mori Point: an area historically impacted by OHVs, but which is undergoing a transformative restoration that benefits both endangered species and the coastal communities that have developed around the Park.

The restoration efforts at Mori Point are essential to the recovery of the San Francisco garter snake, arguably the most beautiful and most imperiled serpent in North America, and I highly recommend that you help fund these restoration efforts with the OHV grant program. The San Francisco garter snake is found in only a handful of locations, and in these locations threats jeopardize the continued existence of the species. Mori Point is the northernmost locale where the species is extant, making it vital to the conservation and recovery of the species as a whole, particularly as the impacts of climate change affect the distribution of resources on the San Francisco peninsula.

Several components of the restoration work are designed to mitigate damages caused by decades of OHV use on the site: damage that continues to impede recovery of the listed species found there. Moreover, the restoration work is essential to counteract existing threats to the species in the vicinity of Mori Point: Sharp Park Golf Course is known to take both the California red-legged frog & the San Francisco garter snake, and the Mori Point restoration work will help mitigate these harms.

The restoration work at Mori Point has also been essential in building nature- and place-based community on California’s central coast. Through site stewardship and special programs, the Mori Point restoration program has helped build a constituency for natural landscapes that, as the historic photos of OHV use at Mori Point demonstrate, were not endemic to the site. By building this constituency, the conservation and recovery programs for endangered species will not only be implemented, but also nurtured for decades to come.

Again, I highly recommend you support the Mori Point restoration program. If you have any questions about the area or the restoration work, feel free to contact me at any time. [Brent Plater - 3/16/09]


 The following are my comments for your OHV Grant request, G08-04-17-R01, for the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy:

The agency has failed to show a correlation between past OHV use and the work that is being proposed. It is not mentioned whether the OHV use was legal. The agency has NO OHV PROGRAM and therefore should not request OHV funding. There are many other funds available for ecological restoration.

4. Agency Contribution

Cost of OHV Program for Land Managerʼs most recent complete fiscal year (not to include cost of indirect overhead): 0

% Funded by OHV Trust Fund (do not include in-lieu funds): 6
(Check the one most appropriate) (Please select one from list)
No OHV Trust Funds were used (6 points)
10% or less of the program cost was from OHV Trust Fund (4 points)
11% to 25% of the program cost was from OHV Trust Fund (3 points)
26% to 50% of the program cost was from OHV Trust Fund (1 point)
More than 50% of the program cost was from OHV Trust Fund (No points)

Comment: The agency has no OHV program, therefore they should receive NO points.

Thank you for considering my comments. [Bruce Brazil - 3/7/09]