Skip to Main Content
Menu
Contact Us Search
OHV Title

Wildflowers at Hungry Valley

Hungry Valley Wildflower Report - March 26, 2017

The grasslands are slow to show bright color yet, but the deep golden-hued fiddleneck and the pinkish filaree are in abundance.
 
Though just starting in the valley, the flowers are beginning to get showy with purple patches of phacelia found behind Sterling Campground and north of Circle Campground; 4WD recommended to access these sites, though they are visible from Gold Hill Road if you are northbound.
 
The goldfields have exploded in many areas of the park, but are especially eye-catching at the practice track. The white daisy-like tidy tips are blooming between Aliklik and Lane Ranch Campgrounds among the goldfields. Further south, the blue dicks are starting to open on their long, slender stems.
 
Come out and play; and while you are here, enjoy the wildflowers!

Hungry Valley Wildflower Report - March 19, 2017

Bladderpod Photo

Flowers in the park are barely starting, but enjoy the view as you drive to the park with the splashes of yellow coreopsis and fiddleneck in Tejon Pass. Poppies are scarce here, right now, but are reported to be showing color along Highway 138 toward the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve near Lancaster.

Within the park, the area around Meadows trail has a light pinkish purple groundcover of filaree, and goldfields and golden bush are starting to show in places along Schmidt Ranch road. The manzanita bushes are covered with pinkish white blossoms along the Oak Grove hiking trail.

Take a drive along the frontage road between Smokey Bear Rd and Gorman to see Joshua trees in bloom. Further north are patches of pale purple phacelia among the yellow valley sunflowers and fiddleneck. The white flowers of the wild cucumber vine sprawl in spots and glow in the morning light.

Also, along the frontage road are bladderpod bushes, showy with their yellow blossoms, and the bush lupine is starting to bloom with their fragrant deep purple flowers.

Please remember that the warm weather that brings out the flowers also brings out the snakes; walk carefully to avoid stepping on flowers, and snakes! Though rattlesnakes are dangerous, they are rarely deadly; however, please keep your distance and let them go on their way.

The flowers should really be popping out over the next few weeks so plan your trip to Hungry Valley now!
Joshua tree bloom photo Valley sunflower photo  Manzanita photo

Wildflowers at Hungry Valley

The wildflowers of Tejon Pass are world renown for their color and abundance. In spring, California Poppies, Goldfields, Lupine, Tidy Tips and other flowers turn the grassy hillsides brilliant shades of orange, yellow and purple. During wildflower season, Hungry Valley SVRA has a self-guided tour route that begins at the Visitor Center and is marked by distinctive blue and white flower signs. (Download the PDF version of the wildflower tour map.)

Wildflower Tour Map

The park annually publishes an informative guide to the native wildflowers of the Tejon Pass. This year, the park is offering self-guided tours. The wildflower brochure, along with a map and directions, are available at the entrance kiosk.

For an update on the most current flower conditions, wildflower enthusiasts are encouraged to call the numbers listed below, the district office at (661) 248-7007 or to check this webpage before visiting the park. Admission to the park is $5.