Hungry Valley SVRA

UPDATE (June 16, 2020) - As California State Parks begins its phased reopening of parks and beaches in compliance with state and local public health ordinances, it is important for visitors to continue to practice physical distancing and avoid congregating with people outside their immediate household. Everyone has the responsibility to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Here are some guidelines for people visiting Hungry Valley State Vehicular Recreation Area:

What is open now?
Hungry Valley SVRA is open for active recreation with restrictions in place to encourage social distancing and reduce group gatherings:
  • Very limited parking is now available to the public.
  • We request that visitors pay by credit/debit card or bring the exact dollar amount ($5 dollar day use fee).
  • We request that visitors remain in their vehicles or next to their vehicles during transactions and inspections of their vehicles. 
  • Trails, routes and open spaces are now open for active recreational use. Rules and regulations are now posted at all Kiosks and at major routes in the SVRA.
  • Only restrooms in the proximity of the parking lots will be available. 
  • Campgrounds are open on a first come, first serve basis and at limited capacity to maintain social distancing and avoid large group gatherings starting June 12. Camping is available only for those in the same family unit. For the new camping guidelines, visit www.parks.ca.gov/COVID19Camping.

What is currently closed at this park and throughout the State Park System?

Statewide:
  • Many campgrounds across the state remain closed until further notice. Some campgrounds have started to reopen with modifications. For more information, please visit www.parks.ca.gov/COVID19Camping.
  • High public-use indoor facilities, including museums and visitor centers.
  • Special events, concessions and tours continue to be canceled until further notice.

Are there any new visitor guidelines?

Yes, please see below:
  • Stay Local: Stay close to home. Parking is very limited. Do not take road trips to parks and beaches or to neighboring states.  
  • Stay Active: Keep moving. Watch for one-way trails.
  • Stay Safer at 6 Feet: Maintain a physical distance of 6 feet or more. Gatherings, picnics and parties are not allowed. Visitors will be asked to leave if there are too many people at the SVRA or on trails that do not allow for the required physical distance.
  • Stay Clean: Be prepared. Bring soap/sanitizer and pack out all trash.
  • Stay Covered: Los Angeles County health orders require everyone to wear a face covering when they are interacting with others who are not members of their household in public and private spaces. Please be sure to wear face coverings.

Thank you for your patience and continued support of California State Parks as we work to limit your risk for exposure to COVID-19 in the outdoors. For more information, please visit parks.ca.gov/FlattenTheCurve.

Welcome to Hungry Valley State Vehicular Recreation Area!

Hungry Valley SVRA is the third largest unit of California State Park's Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division. Located in the Tejon Pass north of Los Angeles and along the Interstate 5 corridor, Hungry Valley offers 19,000 acres and more than 130 miles of scenic trails for motorcycle, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV), dune buggies, and 4x4 recreation. All levels of OHV operator skills will be challenged by the wide variety of terrain and trails at Hungry Valley SVRA.

Elevations at Hungry Valley range from 3,000 to nearly 6,000 feet. Occasional snowfalls occur during the winter. Summers are most often hot, dry and dusty. The most pleasant times of the year for OHV fun are during the Spring and Fall months when the temperatures are mild and occasional rain showers make for good traction and reduced dust. Nighttime temperatures often drop below freezing in the Spring and Fall, as well as during the Winter.

The wide variety of trails at Hungry Valley provides excitement for both beginner and experienced off-roaders. For experienced OHVers challenging trails can be found in the hills and sand washes of the back- country section of the SVRA. Beginners can enjoy the scenery and relative ease of the trails in the Native Grasslands Management Area. Trails in the adjoining Los Padres National Forest are recommended for experienced riders only.

Recreational Land Management

Providing long-term, sustained OHV recreation opportunity is a top priority in SVRA Management. Provisions in California law require actions to stabilize soils and to provide for healthy wildlife populations in OHV recreation areas. Projects are ongoing to stabilize soil areas by reshaping slopes, reseeding and replanting bare areas. Vegetation creates wildlife habitat while plant roots help stabilize the soil. Project areas are temporarily closed to OHV use through the use of barriers, such as fences, hay bales, brush piles and signing. Where possible, well-designed OHV trails are provided through project areas. Other project areas may be closed for a number of years before being opened again for OHV use. Your understanding and support in staying out of areas closed for restoration helps ensure OHV recreation opportunities for years to come.

Where to get help
The State Park Rangers who patrol Hungry Valley SVRA are peace officers, who are trained Emergency Medical Responders. Entrance station employees and park maintenance personnel can also summon medical help. If no State Park personnel are available, dial 911 from any telephone. Pay phones are located at many business locations in Gorman. Cellular telephone coverage is intermittent throughout most of the SVRA. There are no emergency medical facilities in Gorman. The nearest hospital to Hungry Valley SVRA is Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, located approximately 30 miles to the south in Valencia. To drive to the hospital, take Interstate Highway 5 south to the McBean Parkway exit and turn left (east) on McBean Parkway. Henry Mayo Hospital is located approximately one mile from I-5 on the left-hand side at 23845 McBean Parkway.

District Superintendent Orders

The following District Superintendent Orders have been implemented:

 

Hungry Valley State Vehicular Recreation Area
Hungry Valley State Vehicular Recreation Area lies in the heart of a complex geologic structure known as the Ridge Basin. The highly deformed rocks within the park bear stark witness to the tremendous forces that characterize the interplay between the San Andreas and San Gabriel Faults, which bound the basin and the park.

Hungry Valley State Vehicular Recreation Area(Photograph by Steve Reynolds)

The full Geo Gems report  |  Geological Gems of State Parks